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Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
Turkmen jewelry2
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Turkmen jewelry2

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE: …

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The Turkmen Jewelry from the Collection of Marshall and Marilyn R. Wolf exposed (October 9, 2012–February 24, 2013) in The Metropolitan Museum of Art were produced in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Central Asia and Iran by Turkmen craftsmen. While many of the pieces shown here were made by nomads, some were created by craftsmen based in towns or cities.

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  • 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1598160-turkmen-jewelry2/
  • 2. Door Surround20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(44.5 cm) W. (45.1 cm)
  • 3. Door Surround20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(44.5 cm) W. (45.1 cm)
  • 4. Dorsal plate ornamentlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(54.3 x 55.6 cm)
  • 5. Dorsal plate ornamentlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(54.3 x 55.6 cm)
  • 6. Dorsal plate ornamentlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(58.1 x 17.5 cm)
  • 7. Dorsal plate ornamentlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(59.7 x 8.3 cm)
  • 8. Dorsal plate ornamentlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(60.3 x 8.3 cm)
  • 9. Pectoral Disc Ornamentlate 19th– early 20th century Central Asia or Iran(19.7 cm)
  • 10. Floral Pectoral Ornamentlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(26 x 16.5 cm)
  • 11. Floral Pectoral Ornamentlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(21.9 x 12.1 cm)
  • 12. Floral Pectoral Ornamentlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(21.9 x 12.1 cm)
  • 13. Floral Pectoral Ornamentlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(21.9 x 12.1 cm)
  • 14. Neckletmid- to late 19th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(17.8 x 17.5 cm)
  • 15. Neckletmid- to late 19th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(17.8 x 17.5 cm)
  • 16. Ornament Worn Laterallylate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(44.8 x 13.3 cm)
  • 17. Pectoral Disc Ornament20th centurypossibly Afghanistan(17.5 x 12.1cm)
  • 18. Pectoral ornamentearly 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(43.2 cm)
  • 19. Pectoral ornament early 20th century Central Asia or Iran (44.8 x 8.9 cm)Pectoral ornament19th centuryCentral Asia or Iran (10.2 cm)
  • 20. Pectoral ornamentearly 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran
  • 21. Amulet Holderlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(7.3 x 10.2 cm)
  • 22. CrownCrown late 19th–early 20th centurylate 19th–early 20th century Central Asia or IranCentral Asia or Iran (13.3 x 18.1 cm)(13.3 x 18.1 cm)
  • 23. Crownlate 19th–early 20th century CrownCentral Asia or Iran late 19th–early 20th century(11.4 x 17.8) Central Asia or Iran (11.4 x 17.8)
  • 24. Crownlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(22.9 x 29.2 cm)
  • 25. Crown Crownlate 19th–early 20th century late 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran Central Asia or Iran(10.8 x 18.1 cm) (20 x 17.5 cm)
  • 26. Crownlate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran
  • 27. Coat Late 19th–early 20th century Central Asia or IranInto the twentieth century Turkmenwomen decorated their shifts andcoats with rows of embossed silverdiscs ending in lozenge-shapedclasps at their knees. Theseadornments were either sewn directlyonto the coat, as here, or onto panelsthat were fastened to the shift or coatunderneath. On this example thesilver discs were added to the coatlong after the coat was made.
  • 28. Clothing panelLate 19th–early 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran(16.8 x 17.1 cm)
  • 29. Drinking Bowl Shaped as a Begging Bowlearly 20th centuryCentral Asia or Iran
  • 30. The Metropolitan Museum of ArtTurkmen Jewelry from the Collection of Marshall and Marilyn R. Wolf(October 9, 2012–February 24, 2013)The jewelry and robe featured in this exhibition were produced in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Central Asia andIran by Turkmen craftsmen. While Turkmen nomads had lived for hundreds of years in the region now divided betweenTurkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and northeast Iran, their lives changed markedly in the nineteenth century when, inresponse to a loss of pasture land, they increasingly joined settled populations. Despite the cultural shift, Turkmencraftsmen continued to work in a traditional mode. Their impressive silver jewelry was worn by women, though someobjects, such as whips, were used by men. Additionally, silver ornaments were produced for horses, the most valuableasset of nomadic Turkmen. In exchange for the silver and gold used for their jewelry, the Turkmen took and traded slaves,raiding the Persian population as well as Cossacks and Russians.From the top down, Turkmen womens jewelry consisted of headgear in the form of crowns, caps, headbands, and braidornaments; pendants attached to headdresses and suspended on either side of the head; earrings; pectoral and dorsalornaments; amulet holders; appliqués for clothing; armbands; and rings. While many of the pieces shown here were madeby nomads, some were created by craftsmen based in towns or cities. This jewelry reflects the different styles used byspecific tribal groups: the Yomut preferred surfaces crowded with ornamental designs, the Teke produced pieces in whichfire-gilded decoration contrasts with a silver background, and the Ersari and Saryk tended toward no gilding and minimaldecoration. On Kazakh jewelry, stamped decoration resembling granulation is prevalent. In the later twentieth century,craftsmen from Afghanistan and Turkmenistan copied older Turkmen jewelry but often used glass or composite materialsrather than carnelian, pearls, or other semiprecious stones.
  • 31. Text and pictures Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasandaSound: Masters of Persian Music - Torkaman

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