The Beauty of Art Nouveau1

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Art nouveau was an international philosophy and style design that arose in the turn of the twentieth century. The literal meaning is "new art".

Between 1890 and 1910 it was one of the most popular forms of architecture and applied art in Europe. Many would incorporate this style into their homes, furniture, fashion, art and jewelry.

The organic forms and structures of art nouveau mirrored those found in elements like flowers, plants and curved lines. This style makes many of its references to the nature world. Some would even describe it to be fanciful and out of the ordinary.

Art nouveau was eventually replaced by the 20th century modernist style. Ever since then, there hasn't been any other style that's come close to art nouveau, especially when it comes to jewelry.

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  • Art nouveau was an international philosophy and style design that arose in the turn of the twentieth century. The literal meaning is "new art".Between 1890 and 1910 it was one of the most popular forms of architecture and applied art in Europe. Many would incorporate this style into their homes, furniture, fashion, art and jewelry.The organic forms and structures of art nouveau mirrored those found in elements like flowers, plants and curved lines. This style makes many of its references to the nature world. Some would even describe it to be fanciful and out of the ordinary.Art nouveau was eventually replaced by the 20th century modernist style. Ever since then, there hasn't been any other style that's come close to art nouveau, especially when it comes to jewelry.
  • The Beauty of Art Nouveau Jewelry
    Art Nouveau Jewelry would be considered more expressive with the designs. They are very decorative and ornate; commonly featuring elements such as flowers, vines, leaves, insects, animals, mythical beasts and enchanted women.It uses a lot of smooth flowing lines and gentle curves. The pieces tend to be pale in color and would predominantly use warm earth tones.Art nouveau jewelry materials would consist of copper, brass, silver, gold, platinum, pearls, gems, glass, and diamonds. Expensive art nouveau jewelry would typically be made of the more costly materials.
  • ""A new, imperishable beauty," was how the artist and architect Henry van de Velde described it. European Art Nouveau jewelry of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries embraced a new aesthetic characterized by sensuous forms, dramatic imagery and vivid symbolism. Many of the designers associated with the movement sought their inspiration not in traditional jewelry, but in the work of the pre-Raphaelites and Impressionists and in the arts of Japan.
  • Rejecting the rigid naturalism typical of European decorative arts, designers such as Ren Lalique and Henry van de Velde, and the artists of the German Jugenstil and Austrian Wiener Sezession movements, created ornaments that expressed the spirit and freedom of the era. These artists and designers adopted a free-flowing line and asymmetrical format that invigorated their work and set it apart, while their use of natural motifs and of the female form imbued their creations with energy, sensuality and dreamy mysticism. But underlying the undeniable exuberance of these works was a fin-de-sicle edginess that endows this period with inexhaustible fascination."
  • Exuberant, exotic, emotive, expressive, are terms used to describe Art Nouveau jewelry. What is it about Art Nouveau jewelry that touches the hearts of sophisticates, critical collectors, or just the average consumer? It is the beauty that is felt when one views the great works of someone like Renoir, Servat, or Gauguin. Many pieces of Art Nouveau jewelry are truly works of art, not merely items of adornment. Some of the ingredients that make Art Nouveau jewelry so emotionally beautiful are the use of subtle color and shading, suggestion of form, delicate turning and mystical imagery. Appreciation of Art Nouveau takes time. The more one views them, the more apparent their intrinsic beauty becomes. They are imaginative pieces, daring and different from other styles and forms.
  • The Art Nouveau movement, although short lived (approximately 1890 through 1910) made a lasting impact on the jewelry industry which is still felt today. It was a reaction to the mass produced jewelry that had become so popular late in the Victorian period. The style of Art Nouveau jewelry was a radical change from the somberness and adherence to strict rules which characterized both French and English jewellery in the 1860's and 1870's. There were few restrictions in the design of Nouveau jewelry. The most common motifs incorporated life forms, orchids, lilies, irises, ferns, snakes, dragonflies, animal and human forms. Life-like to dream-like simplicity of metal alone to the complexity of enamel and precious gems. The rebellion against the strict customs of the Victorian and Edwardian periods released an incredible out-pouring of creative energy that not only produced pieces of subtle beauty but also touched the sublime and the mystical. No longer would a piece of jewelry be a mere adornment, now it became a part of one's soul.
  • Broche de Vever utilisant des perles d'eau douce d'Amérique.A contemporary of Lalique, Vever made this flower pin. It is made of Mississippi River Pearls and plique-a-jour leaves. Called a ‘bodice ornament’, it was shown at the 1900 Exposition Universelles in Paris. They truly loved items from nature in those days.
  • The Beauty of Art Nouveau1

    1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-2077744-art-nouveau1/
    2. 2. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957 Winged Chimera Designed by Alphonse Mucha and made by jeweler Georges Fouquet Collier Fuschias - Vers 1905 Designed by Charles Desrosiers and made by jeweler Georges Fouquet Collections du Petit Palais, Paris
    3. 3. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957
    4. 4. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957 Museum of Fine Arts Boston Georges Fouquet 1862-1957
    5. 5. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957
    6. 6. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957
    7. 7. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957
    8. 8. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957
    9. 9. Brooch designed by Charles Desrosiers and made by Georges Fouquet, 1901 Victoria & Albert Museum, London
    10. 10. Manufacturer Georges Fouquet (French, 1862–1957); Designer Alphonse Mucha (Czech, 1860– 1939) The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    11. 11. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957 Broche orchidée, 1901 Or, émail, diamant, et perles. Collection du Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
    12. 12. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957 'Les Trois Crabes‘ Museum Bellerive, Zurich
    13. 13. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957 Designed by Alphonse Mucha (Czech, 1860–1939)
    14. 14. Alphonse Mucha (Czech, 1860–1939) Head dress worn by French stage and early film actress Sarah Bernhardt France - Paris : Bibliothèque-Musée de l'Opéra.
    15. 15. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957
    16. 16. Pendentif Orchidée, vers 1905. Or, émail, diamants. Don de M. et Mme Joseph Sataloff. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
    17. 17. Charles Robert Ashbee (1863– 1942) - Spilla
    18. 18. Charles Robert Ashbee (1863– 1942)
    19. 19. Charles Robert Ashbee (1863– 1942)
    20. 20. Charles Robert Ashbee (1863– 1942)
    21. 21. Charles Robert Ashbee (1863– 1942)
    22. 22. Charles Robert Ashbee (1863– 1942)
    23. 23. Charles Robert Ashbee (1863– 1942)
    24. 24. Charles Robert Ashbee (1863– 1942) V&A Museum London
    25. 25. Charles Robert Ashbee (1863– 1942)
    26. 26. Georges Fouquet 1862-1957
    27. 27. Martin Adams - J. Peterman Co.'s LICENSED Reproduction of Butterfly Comb from the film Titanic
    28. 28. Henri Vever, français (1854-1942)
    29. 29. Paul et Henri Vever, 1900 Le musée des Arts décoratifs Paris
    30. 30. Paul et Henri Vever, 1900 Pendentif Le réveilLe Musée des Arts décoratifs
    31. 31. Henri Vever, français (1854-1942)
    32. 32. Henri Vever, français (1854-1942)
    33. 33. Louis Aucoc (1850 – 1932)
    34. 34. Louis Aucoc (1850 – 1932)
    35. 35. Louis Aucoc (1850 – 1932) Christie’s estimated the value of this Aucoc hair pin at £3000 to £4000 in 2009
    36. 36. Louis Aucoc (1850 – 1932)
    37. 37. Louis Zorra , about 1900 Brooch with an opal and pearl Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
    38. 38. French horn comb, ginko pattern. Silver, rhinestones, green cabochon
    39. 39. French hair slide, painted horn, flower design
    40. 40. French horn comb with silver female profile
    41. 41. French painted horn comb with a cicada
    42. 42. Sound: Fiorenza Cossotto - O, mio Fernando, (La Favorita - Donizetti) Text & Pictures: Internet Background flower pictures: Nicoleta Leu Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi oreanuş www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda

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