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http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1871417-ambalangoda2/
Ambalangoda is a big town located in Galle District,
Southern Province, Sri Lanka. The town is famous for its
ancient devi...
Naga Raksha
Percy Mahendra "Mahinda" Rajapaksa
is the 6th President of Sri Lanka and
Commander in Chief of the Sri Lankan
...
Sri Lanka has a rich
culture of theatre called
kolam and exorcism called
tovil, which make use of
actors, exorcists, masks...
Sri Lankans believe that day-to-day life is filled with danger
from the yakku (demons) and other bad forces (vas) that
cau...
The exorcism ends with
the appearance of an
exorcist wearing the mask
of the chief demon called
Maha Kola (the terrific or...
Nari Latha
Masks generally fall into
three categories: kolam,
sanni and raksha. Kolam
masks number around 40
and consist of royalty,
...
Raksha masks, bigger and more detailed, are mainly
used in Sri Lankan festivals and processions.
Numbering around 24, some...
The naga raksha (Cobra demon) mask
of the Raksha Kolama (Demon dance),
consist of a ferocious face with bulging,
popping &...
There are several
countries known for their
batik creations, starting
with India where it
originated. After that it
moved ...
Text : Internet
Pictures Sanda Foi oreanuş and Internet
Copyright: All the images belong to their authors
Presentation: Sa...
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
Sri Lanka, Masks Museum  Ambalangoda2
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Sri Lanka, Masks Museum Ambalangoda2

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Sri Lankans believe that day-to-day life is filled with danger from the yakku (demons) and other bad forces (vas) that cause illness, misfortune or death. Demons are thought to live everywhere and it is believed that they can possess humans. To exorcise them, a devil dance is performed, with dancers wearing grotesque masks with bulging eyes, sharp teeth and lots of other scary features. Ambalangoda is a town traditional the best place to acquire some fantastic specimens from master carvers.

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  • Thanks Ildiko for visit and for adding this presentation to your favourites. Thanks
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  • Thanks John. In an Island famous for worshipping demons believed to be living in trees and mountains, devil masks are in popular usage for ungodly practices.
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    Gacias Pilar
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  • Estas todavía me parecen mejores, más espectaculares. Verlas como las mueven tiene que dar miedo, pero los autores de las máscaras tienen que ser grandes artistas. Felicitaciones por estas magníficas presentaciones. Gracias, Pilar
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  • Devil Masks When you travel south on the Galle Road you have the opportunity to acquire a uniquely Sri Lankan souvenir – the devil mask . Demons are thought to live everywhere and it is believed that they can possess humans. To exorcise them, a devil dance is performed, with dancers wearing grotesque masks with bulging eyes, sharp teeth and lots of other scary features. Ambalangoda is a town traditional the best place to acquire some fantastic specimens from master carvers. Masks generally fall into three categories: kolam , sanni and raksha.   Kolam masks number around 40 and consist of royalty, village characters and animals. The drama is made up of connecting satirical stories loosely based around a visit by King Maha Sammatha and his pregnant wife, Queen Menikpala, to a village during colonial times. The colourful masks have bulging staring eyes, wide-open toothless mouths, and representational humorous features. Some are decorated with natural fibres used to make hair. They appear lifelike when they are worn by the costumed dancers, who say their dialogue and swagger to the rhythmic beat of the bereya drum. Jathakaya masks are used at the end of the kolam dance. Characters are taken from the book Pansiya Panas Jathakaya , which describes the 550 former lives of the Buddha.
  • Sri Lankans believe that day-to-day life is filled with danger from the yakku (demons) and other bad forces ( vas ) that cause illness, misfortune or death. The sanni masks symbolize the 18 demons that represent these certain sicknesses or diseases. When someone has a lingering or incurable sickness, an exorcism healing ceremony or devil dance is performed. Lasting throughout the night, the relevant demons are summoned, offered a tribute and requested to leave the patient alone. If the patient is blind, the kana-sanniya demon is called upon (on the mask, the eyes look blind) or for an unbearable fever, the giniyala-sanniya demon (the mask is red-hot and fiery), and so on. Carved quite simply, with the demon’s leering features and infused with its essence and spirit, these masks are designed to be both hypnotizing and terrifying. A huge medicinal mask, the maha kola , displays all 18 faces in miniature. There are also 12 pali masks representing followers of the God Vesamuni, who arrive before the demons to clean the ceremonial location and prepare sacrifices. Raksha masks, bigger and more detailed, are mainly used in Sri Lankan festivals and processions. Numbering around 24, some of them appear at the end of a kolam performance. Common masks are the naga raksha , a demonic face shrouded by many cobras, and its enemy the fearsome mythical hawk-like bird, gurulu raksha . The gurulu raksha is commonly hung on houses to ward away demons. In Ambalangoda the main carvers are descendents of Ariyapala Wijesuriya, who was responsible for bringing the fame of mask carving to Ambalangoda. His sons now continue his tradition from two masks shops at the northern end of town (see previous article).
  • Masks are carved from the lightweight wood of the kadura tree ( nux vomica ), which grow in the marshy lands bordering paddy fields. When felled, the bark is removed and the trunk cut into pieces to form a base block. Then the wood is smoke dried for a week before it can be hand carved, which is done in stages. When dry it is similar to balsa. The dimensions of the masks are measured in viyathas and fingers. One viyatha is the handspan of a mature man. For example, the large mask of King Maha Sammatha is five viyathas high, while his shoulders are three viyathas wide and three fingers in breadth. The finished carving is polished first with the rough skin of the sea fish thalapatha and maduwa and then further smoothed with the leaves of the mota daliya boodadiya or korosa trees and treated with a sealant called allidyu . The traditional way to colour the mask was with natural pigments that came from clay (red and white), leaves (green), fruit (blue and yellow) and charred cotton (black), though paint is preferred nowadays. A lacquer sealant called valichchiya is used to protect the colours, made of a mixture of resin powder and the oil of the dorana tree. The hand painting is executed according to instructions given in the ancient ola-leaf books. The larger masks take up to six weeks to complete while smaller ones take about a week.
  • Transcript of "Sri Lanka, Masks Museum Ambalangoda2"

    1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1871417-ambalangoda2/
    2. 2. Ambalangoda is a big town located in Galle District, Southern Province, Sri Lanka. The town is famous for its ancient devil masks and devil dancers and for puppets. The hand carved & hand painted masks in traditional style are vibrant & colorful.
    3. 3. Naga Raksha Percy Mahendra "Mahinda" Rajapaksa is the 6th President of Sri Lanka and Commander in Chief of the Sri Lankan Armed Forces
    4. 4. Sri Lanka has a rich culture of theatre called kolam and exorcism called tovil, which make use of actors, exorcists, masks, music, and dance. The Sanni Yakuma is the best known exorcism ritual, in which numerous sanni (disease) demons are portrayed by exorcists wearing elaborate masks. Occasionally the full complement of 18 possible disease demons is represented in the Daha Ata Sanniya (18 diseases) ritual, but usually a smaller number are used according to which demons are thought to be causing a person's affliction.
    5. 5. Sri Lankans believe that day-to-day life is filled with danger from the yakku (demons) and other bad forces (vas) that cause illness, misfortune or death. The sanni masks symbolize the 18 demons that represent these certain sicknesses or diseases. When someone has a lingering or incurable sickness, an exorcism healing ceremony or devil dance is performed. Lasting throughout the night, the relevant demons are summoned, offered a tribute and requested to leave the patient alone. If the patient is blind, the kana-sanniya demon is called upon (on the mask, the eyes look blind) or for an unbearable fever, the giniyala-sanniya demon (the mask is red-hot and fiery), and so on. Carved quite simply, with the demon’s leering features and infused with its essence and spirit, these masks are designed to be both hypnotizing and terrifying. A huge medicinal mask, the maha kola, displays all 18 faces in miniature
    6. 6. The exorcism ends with the appearance of an exorcist wearing the mask of the chief demon called Maha Kola (the terrific or all encompassing one), which usually incorporates miniature representations of the other 18 demons. Detailed accounts of these rituals and associated beliefs have been documented by anthropologists, and their roles as a form of behavioral therapy have also been considered.
    7. 7. Nari Latha
    8. 8. Masks generally fall into three categories: kolam, sanni and raksha. Kolam masks number around 40 and consist of royalty, village characters and animals. The drama is made up of connecting satirical stories loosely based around a visit by King Maha Sammatha and his pregnant wife, Queen Menikpala, to a village during colonial times. Sri Lankans believe that day-to-day life is filled with danger from the yakku (demons) and other bad forces (vas) that cause illness, misfortune or death. The sanni masks symbolize the 18 demons that represent these certain sicknesses or diseases.
    9. 9. Raksha masks, bigger and more detailed, are mainly used in Sri Lankan festivals and processions. Numbering around 24, some of them appear at the end of a kolam performance. Common masks are the naga raksha, a demonic face shrouded by many cobras, and its enemy the fearsome mythical hawk- like bird, gurulu raksha. The gurulu raksha is commonly hung on houses to ward away demons. In Ambalangoda the main carvers are descendents of Ariyapala Wijesuriya, who was responsible for bringing the fame of mask carving to Ambalangoda. His sons now continue his tradition from two masks shops at the northern end of town (see previous article). Naga Raksha
    10. 10. The naga raksha (Cobra demon) mask of the Raksha Kolama (Demon dance), consist of a ferocious face with bulging, popping & staring eyes, a bloodthirsty carnivorous tongue lolling out of wide mouth armored & armed to the hilt with set of fanglike teeth, & all topped by a set of cobra hoods
    11. 11. There are several countries known for their batik creations, starting with India where it originated. After that it moved to Indonesia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Thailand and the West. While Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand are known for their block printing (tjab) method to create batik on a large scale, in Sri Lanka batik is still made by hand. Sri Lankan batik is less intricate and more suited to modern times. Batik Shops and Factories can be found in and around Ambalangoda.
    12. 12. Text : Internet Pictures Sanda Foi oreanuş and Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi oreanuş www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound: Sri Lanka - Mayura Vannama - Typical dance
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