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René Lalique8

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René Lalique talented French designer whose career spanned the last years of the 19th century and early years of the 20th. Not only was he a jeweler of great talent and creativity, but his glasswork is legendary among collectors.
René Lalique (1860-1945) raised jewelry to the level of a fine art, using his amazing technical virtuosity to realize a very personal imagery based equally in dream and nature. He has been called the greatest artist-jeweler since the Renaissance.
In 1908 Lalique chose to abandon jewelry making and focus his artistic talents on glasswork. He began creating unique perfume bottles, first for the French firm Coty. He soon was designing bottles for numerous top perfume companies, including Guerlain and Worth. All told, Lalique designed over 250 perfume bottles.
Lalique was also known for his graceful vases and embraced the Art Deco style in his glasswork. In the 1920s René Lalique began designing elegant hood ornaments for automobiles. The glass ornaments were designed to be lit by a bulb and were featured on Bentleys, Bugattis and more.
Although he died in 1945, the company that René Lalique founded is still in operation today. Today his designs are highly sought and while some of his work fetches prices of tens of thousands of dollars, other pieces are available to collectors of more modest means.
Calouste Gulbenkian (1869–1955) was a friend of René Lalique’s for fifty years, as well as a great connoisseur of the various activities of this versatile artist. Between 1899 and 1927 he acquired eighty extraordinary works of art directly from the artist. Today, these are conserved in an exclusive space inside the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon.

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  • Crysis, Lalique Mascots for Luxury Cars‎
    René Jules Lalique (1860 – 1945) was a French glass designer known for his creations of perfume bottles, vases, jewellery, chandeliers, clocks and automobile hood ornaments. He started a glassware firm, named after himself, which still remains successful. He went on to be one of the most famous in his field, his name synonymous with creativity, beauty and quality.
    Lalique reinvented jewelry. A contemporary asked, "Prior to René Lalique, what was jewelry? The old jewel was based upon the idea of wealth; the new is built upon an artistic idea." Jewelry had relied on gems, particularly diamonds, and on precious metals. But between about 1892 and 1897 Lalique developed an approach that emphasized artistry over intrinsic value. He introduced horn and other new materials and made extensive use of glass, enamel, ivory, and semiprecious stones. Lalique especially loved the ever-changing iridescence of opals. It has been said that where the old jewelry sparkled, Lalique's glowed.
  • As soon as mass production and second-rate firms began flooding the market with “Lalique-style” jewels, Lalique himself turned to a new medium–glass and a style that moved way from Art Nouveau’s interpretations of nature to a more abstract and simple form.  
  • 1912: he designed the glass-decorated façade of the Coty Building in New-York, now Henri Bendel  on 5th Avenue
    1925: The " Exposition des Arts Décoratifs ".As well as totally decorating his own stand, he also carried out a dining room decor for the Sèvres Porcelaine Factory stand. This comprised a table, chandeliers and a glass service from his workshops as well as a specially created coffered ceiling entirely in glass. A huge fountain, 15 meters high, entitled «Sources of France ", decorated with caryatids. The writer Colette believed a more appropriate name would have been «The Fountain of Wonders ".
    1927: design of the doors for the lift of the Oviatt Building in Los Angeles. 1928: He was asked to provide the decor for the "Orient Express".
    1929: decoration of the Peace Hotel in Shanghaï 1930: He designed and manufactured the decor for the choir of the chapel Notre Dame de Fidélité in Douvres la Délivrande, France. In 1987 this piece of work was classified as a listed building of historical interest.
    1932: he carried out the decoration of the Church of St Matthew in St Helier, Jersey. He also designed the doors in the imperial palace of Prince Asaka, a Japanese collector of Art Deco pieces. The palace, which was constructed in the early 1930s, is today the Teien museum, Tokyo. 1936: The decorations of the First Class Dining Room of the famous ocean liner "Normandie", renowned for its stylishness, consisted principally of René Lalique glass lamps.
  • The decanter was created to celebrate the anniversary of master glassmaker René Lalique’s birth and was based in the decanter from the 1920s, the time when The Macallan distillery was founded.
  • St Matthews church offers the unique opportunity to see the work of Parisian Rene Lalique with its moulded white glass.
  • Rene Lalique was brought in to design the 12 towering lights, numerous sconces and two massive chandeliers for the dining room. The Cristalleries de Compiegne, trading under the name of Degue, was given the commission to create 6,000 individually crafted glass panels for the room's walls.
    While much has been written about Lalique, little is known about the Degue glassworks. The firm, which operated between 1926 and 1939, was situated in the picturesque town of Compiegne, about 50 miles northeast of Paris. The town had been the site of the Great War Armistice signing and boasts an elegant Louis XVI chateau that was the preferred residence of Napoleon III and the Empress Eugenie. It was also where Joan of Arc was betrayed to the English.
  • In the 1920s he also became famous for his work in the Art Deco style. Among other things he was responsible for the walls of lighted glass and the elegant glass columns which filled the dining room and grand salon of the SS Normandie.Recognised as one of the world's greatest glass makers and jewellery designers of the art Nouveau and art Deco periods, René Jules Lalique was an imaginative and creative artist in all his work. Lalique's early life was spent in many different types of artistic businesses, acting as apprentice and assistant. This heavily influenced the designs he used in his later life, including his emphasis on glass.
    He used the most modern and innovative manufacturing techniques and equipment available, allowing more than one glass piece to be made at a time while still looking hand made, which meant his quality jewellery was available to the general public.
    Entre 1925 et 1939, Lalique est sollicité partout dans le monde en tant que maître verrier. On lui confie la décoration de la salle à manger de première classe du fameux paquebot Normandie, de l’intérieur d’une église à Jersey, du palais d’un Prince Impérial japonais devenu aujourd’hui le musée Teien de Tokyo... René Lalique a réalisé, entre autres, la décoration de wagons de l'Orient-Express et de la salle à manger du paquebot Normandie
  • Rene Lalique was brought in to design the 12 towering lights, numerous sconces and two massive chandeliers for the dining room. The Cristalleries de Compiegne, trading under the name of Degue, was given the commission to create 6,000 individually crafted glass panels for the room's walls.
    While much has been written about Lalique, little is known about the Degue glassworks. The firm, which operated between 1926 and 1939, was situated in the picturesque town of Compiegne, about 50 miles northeast of Paris. The town had been the site of the Great War Armistice signing and boasts an elegant Louis XVI chateau that was the preferred residence of Napoleon III and the Empress Eugenie. It was also where Joan of Arc was betrayed to the English.
  • Although the dining room was compared to the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles, the Normandie's architects may have drawn on more classical sources for their inspiration.
    Accounts of entering the Parthenon atop the Acropolis in Athens describe an experience not dissimilar to entering the Normandie's dining room. In both cases, two massive bronze doors opened onto a cavernous light-filled space, which, at the farthest end, was dominated by a colossal statue in classical Greek robes with her right hand extended. A statue of Peace by Louis Dejean anchored the Normandie's room rather than one of Athena, as was the case in the Parthenon.
  • Degue was the brainchild of the enigmatic David Gueron. Born in Turkey to Spanish Jewish parents, he fled scandal at the age of 22 by joining the French Foreign Legion in 1914, only to be sent to the Western Front, where he was wounded and pensioned out of the army. Following the 1925 Exposition des Arts Decoratifs in Paris, he set up his glassworks.
    Principally manufactured as lavish, highly sought after, colorful objets d'art, Degue glass was destined for the collections of the few privileged Americans and French able to afford them. These extravagant works were rarely seen outside the homes of such collectors but influenced the taste and fashions of the day through their appearance in exhibitions and magazines in the 1920s and '30s.
    The fabrication of hammered and chiseled panels for the Normandie with their engraved diamonds patterns and eglomise finishes by famed French glass painter Auguste Labouret, was the largest assignment ever undertaken by the firm.
  • 1912: he designed the glass-decorated façade of the Coty Building in New-York, now Henri Bendel  on 5th Avenue
    1925: The " Exposition des Arts Décoratifs ".As well as totally decorating his own stand, he also carried out a dining room decor for the Sèvres Porcelaine Factory stand. This comprised a table, chandeliers and a glass service from his workshops as well as a specially created coffered ceiling entirely in glass. A huge fountain, 15 meters high, entitled «Sources of France ", decorated with caryatids. The writer Colette believed a more appropriate name would have been «The Fountain of Wonders ".
    1927: design of the doors for the lift of the Oviatt Building in Los Angeles. 1928: He was asked to provide the decor for the "Orient Express".
    1929: decoration of the Peace Hotel in Shanghaï 1930: He designed and manufactured the decor for the choir of the chapel Notre Dame de Fidélité in Douvres la Délivrande, France. In 1987 this piece of work was classified as a listed building of historical interest.
    1932: he carried out the decoration of the Church of St Matthew in St Helier, Jersey. He also designed the doors in the imperial palace of Prince Asaka, a Japanese collector of Art Deco pieces. The palace, which was constructed in the early 1930s, is today the Teien museum, Tokyo. 1936: The decorations of the First Class Dining Room of the famous ocean liner "Normandie", renowned for its stylishness, consisted principally of René Lalique glass lamps.
  • Transcript

    • 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1998697-ren-lalique8/
    • 2. Lalique is remembered for his jewelry and his glass. But his greatest accomplishments were born in his recognition of the changing world in which he lived. His life spanned the entire period from the Civil War to World War II and as his world changed, so did Lalique. His amazing turn of careers and fields put him in the forefront of the new mass production. He was a jeweler, he was a glassmaker, he was an artist. But his great accomplishment was to combine those talents with foresight and innovation to not just serve markets, but to create them. In the process, Lalique would become a world class industrialist with an industrial ability on par with any other of his rich talents and achievements. The artist, the designer, the jeweler, the innovator, the glassmaker, the industrialist, the visionary! This is his story.
    • 3. Car mascot Crysis, Lalique Mascots for Luxury Cars
    • 4. One of the reasons that Lalique became perhaps the greatest glassmaker of all times was that he applied his techniques of jewelry-making to glass art and his works conveyed his love of nature, capturing its poetry and enough realistic detail to impress everyone who encountered it.
    • 5. 1932: Lalique designed the doors in the imperial palace of Prince Asaka, a Japanese collector of Art Deco pieces. The palace, which was constructed in the early 1930s, is today the Teien museum, Tokyo.
    • 6. Lalique glass lobby, Fairmont Peace Hotel in Shanghai, China
    • 7. Lalique ‘serpent' red onyx necklace.The company's involvement and influence with chinese arts dates back to founder René Lalique's design of the Peace hotel in Shanghai.
    • 8. The Cathay Hotel (as it was then known) opened in August 1929. At a' dizzy ' 12 storey's it was the first high rise in China. Decked out in all her Art Deco finery Lalique Chandeliers glittering like drop-earrings, marble floor shimmering like a silk evening dress - the hotel became the toast of Shanghai.
    • 9. The world’s most expensive whisky, a one of a kind crystal Lalique decanter with the oldest and rarest Macallan single malt ever bottled was auctioned on 2010 November 15 in New York ($ 460,000 is just enough to claim the title of the most expensive whisky). The decanter was created by the crystal artisan using the ancient “cire perdue” or “lost wax” method.
    • 10. The Cire Perdue decanter was designed and hand crafted by Lalique exclusively for The Macallan, inspired by the beauty of The Macallan’s 150 hectare estate in north eastern Scotland. Proceeds from this auction was donated to charity.
    • 11. René Jules Lalique is best known for his jewelry and decorative arts which were designed primarily in the Art Nouveau style but and one of his architectural pieces can be found right here in New York City on the facade of Henri Bendel on Fifth Avenue
    • 12. The Windows that Saved a Building In 1985, developers proposed building a tower on Fifth Avenue that potentially involved the demolition of the Coty Building, along with its neighbors. The Municipal Arts Society and other community organizations rallied to save the Coty building and in 1985 it designated a landmark by the city. The proposed tower was constructed, and ultimately, resulted only in the demolition of 716 Fifth Avenue, a few doors down. The Coty Building’s landmark designation was largely due to the presence of the Lalique windows. Currently, the windows are one of the many privately owned public spaces in the city, which is denoted by a plaque with a tree on the building’s facade.
    • 13. Rene Lalique Panel Pavots of the same design as was used in the Coty building in New York City
    • 14. 1932: he carried out the decoration of the Church of St Matthew in St Helier, Jersey. St Matthews church offers the unique opportunity to see the work of Parisian Rene Lalique with its moulded white glass.
    • 15. The reverse of the note shows the unique Lalique glass sculptures in St Matthew’s church, St Lawrence
    • 16. the chapel Notre Dame de Fidélité in Douvres la Délivrande, France
    • 17. the chapel Notre Dame de Fidélité in Douvres la Délivrande, France
    • 18. source-de-la-fontaine statue
    • 19. While nature was a rich source of inspiration for René Lalique, one of its inhabitants - the serpent - and its associated symbolism were a constant theme for the artist throughout the rich variations of his work. The reptilian undulations that initially echoed the naturalistic spirals of Art nouveau, with highly marked symbolism, would later gracefully adapt to the streamlined beauty of Art deco creations. A Serpent corsage ornament, vase and flacon are a few of the well-known pieces that illustrate this rich animal theme. This exceptional piece of jewellery makes a magnificent addition to this leitmotif.
    • 20. Probably the most extravagant and beautiful ocean liner ever constructed, the Normandie is the the ultimate example of Art Deco design. At the time of her construction, she was the largest moving object the world had ever seen.  Her first class spaces were not to be matched, before or since.  The restaurant was over 300 feet long, three decks high, and featured a great, tumbling staircase for the elite to make a grand entrance. 
    • 21. Four golden lacquered wall panels from the First Class Smoking Room
    • 22.   Among the most exceptional public rooms was the first-class dining room, which could seat 1,000 guests at a time and was reputedly so spectacular that even the most blasé traveler, whether millionaire, politician or movie star, was awed upon entering this temple of French cuisine. The room measured more than 300 feet in length and 45 feet in width and rose over three decks. The ship's owners advertised it as being larger than the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles.
    • 23. Glass medallions by Lalique
    • 24. Lalique glass in the Dining Car Venice & Orient Express
    • 25. The architects ordered him to freely decorate the restaurant car, and the result is a triumph of glass panels adorned with figures, inserted inside the boiserie in Cuban mahogany wood or in buttonwood, ornamental patters especially realized for the rapid Côte d’Azur Pullman Express in 1928. On the pressed-glass panels set on silver appear female naked bodies surrounded by vine leaves and a man playing the flute; but also flower & leaves’ bouquets and a few images of blackbirds pecking at grapes, all rendered with extraordinary execution refinement and assembled as if they were parts of a single mosaic. The theme recalling nature is also portrayed on the elegant tulip-shaped abat-jours or in the realization of truly exceptional arm-chairs.
    • 26. Text & Pictures: Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu Sound: Mado Robin's last recording - A vos jeux, mes amis from Thomas' Hamlet www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda