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René Lalique2
 

René Lalique2

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http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1998663-ren-lalique2/
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René Lalique (1860-1945) raised jewelry to the level of a fine art, using his amazing technical virtuosity to realize a very personal imagery based equally in dream and nature. He has been called the greatest artist-jeweler since the Renaissance. In the 1890s, a time when most jewelers displayed diamonds and pearls in glittering profusion, Lalique began to create subtle, painterly effects by combining opals, baroque pearls, semi-precious colored stones, glass, and enamel.

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  • René Lalique (1860-1945) raised jewelry to the level of a fine art, using his amazing technical virtuosity to realize a very personal imagery based equally in dream and nature. <br />   <br /> René Lalique (1860-1945) has been called the greatest artist-jeweler since the Renaissance. In the 1890s, a time when most jewelers displayed diamonds and pearls in glittering profusion, Lalique began to create subtle, painterly effects by combining opals, baroque pearls, semi-precious colored stones, glass, and enamel. <br />   <br /> He raised jewelry to the level of a fine art, using his amazing technical virtuosity to realize a very personal imagery based equally in dream and nature. Many of Lalique&apos;s jewels were unique masterpieces, some almost too eccentric to be worn. They were made for a select clientele of collectors and ladies of fashion. When these marvels were revealed to a wider public at the Exposition Universelle of 1900 in Paris, they brought Lalique fame throughout Europe and America. <br />
  • Hailed as the first maker of fine jewelry to work in the Art Nouveau style, Lalique broke with past traditions and created the first truly "modern" jewels. Always an innovator, he experimented constantly with new techniques and unusual materials. Glass, in particular, captured Lalique&apos;s imagination, and he used it in his jewels. By 1910, he had turned his full attention to glass making. <br />   <br /> He revolutionized that field as well, reinventing himself for the 20th century as a designer of jewel-like glass vessels and large-scale architectural components meant for industrial production. Today the name Lalique has become synonymous with elegant artistry in glass. <br />
  • In April, 2008, Christies sold this Lalique horn comb with a blue and green enameled Japanese landscape and a sunset in yellowish orange enamel for $273,500. The comb was made c. 1900 and is one of Japonisme’s greatest expressions from the French side. <br /> On 9/21/09, the SAME COMB was put on sale again with a price estimate of $15,000 to $20,000, and sold for $92,500. I don’t understand this at all. The only thing I can think of is that something happened to the finances of the previous buyer, and they were in trouble. I agree with the first price, just like I agree with the Galliard comb selling for $218,500. Who knows. Someone got a bargain. I hope they realize what they won. <br />

René Lalique2 René Lalique2 Presentation Transcript

  • http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1998663-ren-lalique2/
  • René Jules Lalique (1860 – 1945) reinvented jewelry. A contemporary asked, "Prior to René Lalique, what was jewelry? The old jewel was based upon the idea of wealth; the new is built upon an artistic idea." Jewelry had relied on gems, particularly diamonds, and on precious metals. But between about 1892 and 1897 Lalique developed an approach that emphasized artistry over intrinsic value. He introduced horn and other new materials and made extensive use of glass, enamel, ivory, and semiprecious stones. Lalique especially loved the everchanging iridescence of opals. It has been said that where the old jewelry sparkled, Lalique's glowed.
  • In April, 2008, Christies sold this Lalique horn comb with an enameled Japanese landscape for $273,500.
  • Musée d’Orsay Paris Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
  • Lucien Gaillard
  • Text: Internet Pictures: Internet & Daniela Iacob Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu Sound: Sumi Jo - Je romps la chaine qui m'engage André Ernest Modeste Grétry (1741-1813) L‘amant jaloux www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda