Palermo Palazzo Normanni2
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The history of the palace goes back to the 9th century during the time of Arab rule, but probably goes back even further. Today it is the seat of Sicily's semi-autonomous regional government.

The history of the palace goes back to the 9th century during the time of Arab rule, but probably goes back even further. Today it is the seat of Sicily's semi-autonomous regional government.
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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • Thank you Marco for visit, comments, time, kindness, THANK YOU!
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  • Thanks for sharing this beautiful and historical/tour presentation!
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  • Carissima Cachi, thank you! Im so glad when you have time and are in the team
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  • Thank you Michaela, another tour with beautiful architecture and art. Great job!
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  • Muchas gracias Pilar por tus comentarios en Sicilia. Me alegro de que lo disfrutaras.
    Do you know? For me Pilar Blanco means MADRID. I love Madrid even more after your shows!
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  • Palazzo dei Normanni   Il Palazzo Reale o dei Normanni di Palermo was constructed on the highest part of the city, above a Punic installation discovered in 1984 (located in the section under the Sala Duca di Montalto). During the Arab domination, the first nucleus was built between the rivers Kemonia and Papireto with characteristics which were typically defensive and which is the reason of its name “Qasr”, a word which in Arabic indicates more than a castle, but also a fortress for military assignments. With the arrival of the Normans to Palermo in 1072, the reconstruction and amplification of the city began, work which allowed the transformation from fortress to Palazzo Reale and nevralgic center of complicated events that, in 1130, following the crowning of Ruggero II di Altavilla (the first Norman King of Sicily) conducted to the construction of the marvellous Cappella Palatina. Four towers characterized the main nucleus of the Palazzo dei Normanni , inside of which there could be a workshop and a textile laboratory (tiraz); to which the courts, first of Ruggero II and later of Guglielmo I (il Malo ) and of Guglielmo II (il Bono ), succeeded on the miracle of joining cultures deeply different.
  • Federico II di Svevia, heir of  Enrico VI Hohenstaufen and Costanza di Altavilla, continued the political point of view of his grandfather Ruggero II,  even if it happened when he was very young, he organized the administrative  activities, as well as the cultural aspects with the meetings of the Scuola Poetica Siciliana. After a period of forgetfulness, characterized during the Angevin and Aragonese domination, the Palazzo Reale was relaunched  from the politics of the Spanish viceroys in the second period of the XVI century, and therefore were constituted new architectonic elements with military and representative typology, consistent with the new organizational needs (among which the two main courtyards, della Fontana del 1584 e Maqueda del 1600). The Bourbons period gave a cue for the completement of the “Palazzo” and in particular to the new decorations in the Sala d'Ercole, today home of the Assemblea Regionale Siciliana.
  • Expect tight security as you wander around the Royal Apartments above, as this is still a seat of government. (On some days, visitors may not gain entrance at all.) You'll first enter Salone d'Ercole, from 1560, the chamber of the Sicilian parliament. The salon is named for the mammoth frescoes, created by Giuseppe Velasquez in the 19th century, depicting the Twelve Labours of Hercules. Only six panels are visible (the others are concealed behind the gallery). The most dramatic scene is the slaying of the multiheaded Hydra of Lerna. You definitely won't want to adopt the three-headed dog, Cerberus, as your pet.
  • This is Palermo's greatest attraction and Sicily's finest treasure-trove. Allow 1 1/2 hours and visit just this site if your time is really limited. The history of the palace can be traced from the 9th century and the days of the Arab emirs and their harems, but probably goes back even further: The Arabs built the palace on an older Roman and Punic fortress. Over time it was abandoned by the Arabs, and the conquering Normans restored it into a sumptuous residence. The Normans came and went, and by the mid-16th century the palace was in serious decay until discovered anew by Spanish viceroys, who in 1555 began its rescue and once again turned it into a royal residence. Today it is the seat of Sicily's semiautonomous regional government.
  • During the reign of Frederick II, the Palace, continuing in the vein Roger had begun, became a melting pot and meeting place of cultures, races and traditions. This idyllic Swabian epoch, however, was not to last. New invaders and ages superseded the Norman Kings. After Frederick II's death the Palace was abandoned and fell into decay; only the Palace Chapel was preserved for posterity.
  • The most intriguing room of the apartments is the Sala di Ruggero II, where King Roger himself slumbered. It's decorated with 12th-century mosaics. Look for depictions of the peacock; it was said, symbolically, that the flesh of the peacock would never rot.
  • One of the most splendid courts of Europe once held forth in other rooms of the Royal Apartments. Here the Western world met the mysteries of the East, as Latin scholars conversed and exchanged ideas with Arab astronomers. Regrettably, little is left of those golden days, when this was the most magnificent of European medieval courts. Torre Pisana On the northeast front of the Norman Palace in Palermo one prominent Norman structure remains; this is the high Torre Pisana with its neat square stone blocks and blind arcades of ogival arches. The treasury was once housed on its ground floor. It is the last remaining of the original four towers; inside is a typical square hall 15m/50ft high. In 1791 the viceroy Caramanico allowed Giuseppe Piazzi to build an observatory on the top floor, and its dome is to be seen above the Norman building.
  • In 1555, the whole building was renovated during the reign of the Fish Aragon dynasty. The viceroys altered much of the original building, raising the façade, demolishing three of the four towers and creating two large courtyards. During an archeological survey in Nineteen Hundreds, rooms of fictional dimensions were discovered in the castle: a Room of Treasures was found in a tower: protected by a double door and surrounded by patrol walkways; inside, huge jars, stashed from floor to ceiling, walled in and filled to overflowing with gold coins were discovered. In another room, invaluable decorations in stucco, and mosaic were uncovered. the Palazzo dei Normanni, ceiling of King Rugge An imposing structure in the heart of old Palermo, this Norman palace of great historical and artistic importance has, over the centuries, undergone numerous transformations and is currently the Sicilian local government headquarters. A royal residence in Norman times, defended by four towers and richly decorated with Arab designs, it also had its own circle of artists, scientists and literary figures during the reign of Frederick II. The Ruggero, Duca di Montalto, Ercole, Pompeiana rooms and the Torre dei Venti courtyard are however open to the public.
  • This castle was also equipped for battles: secret stairways, tiny hidden doors, in the base of the castle walls, to facilitate escape; pitfalls (covered traps in the floor) and mechanical defense devices for the accurate dispensing of boiling oil over the castle walls were found. Finally, dank dungeons lit only by a chink of light creeping through the narrow castle wall windows all testify to a medieval castle equipped for action. Nowadays, the Palace, with its last façade dating from the Fifteen Hundreds, is the seat of the Sicilian Regional Assembly .
  • If you enter from Piazza Indipendenza, you'll be directed to the splendid Cappella Palatina (Palatine Chapel) , representing the apex of the Arabo-Norman collective genius and built by Roger II from 1130 to 1140, when it was adorned with extraordinary Byzantine mosaics. You'd have to travel to Istanbul or Ravenna to encounter mosaics as awe-inspiring as these. The whole cycle constitutes the largest array of Islamic paintings to survive to the present day.
  • The chapel features a nave and two aisles divided by oval arches. The central area is surmounted by a hemispheric dome set on corner niches over a mosaic floor with walls of marble wainscoting. At the entrance to the nave is a mammoth royal throne encrusted in mosaics. Note the towering Paschal candelabrum carved with figures, wild animals, and acanthus leaves, a masterpiece that has come down from the 12th century. Covering the central nave is a honeycomb stalactite wooden muqarnas ceiling , a true masterpiece and the creation of Arab artisans brought from North Africa. They depict scenes from daily life, including animal hunts and dances. Our favorite? The depiction of a "picnic" in a harem. The mosaics were installed to teach the story of the Bible to an illiterate people. We're especially fond of Adam and Eve, each with the "forbidden fruit" in their mouths and greedily reaching for a second luscious piece. Ah, the symbolism. There is no one set of mosaics to seek out: It is the sum total that adds to a miraculous artistic statement. Biblical scenes decorate the walls, with the image of Christ Pantocrator, surrounded by angels, on the cupola. The colors of the mosaics are vivid, the style realistic, the effect sometimes achieved by gold-backed tesserae and silver mosaic tiles. This mixed inlay makes the surfaces gleam in the soft light. The mosaics in the nave are evocative of those at Monreale's Duomo. If you don't have time to visit Monreale, you'll have seen the essence of this brilliant art here. Almond-eyed biblical characters from the Byzantine world create a panorama of epic pageantry, illustrating such Gospel scenes as the Nativity. The effect is enhanced by inlaid marble as well as by pillars made of granite shipped from the East.

Palermo Palazzo Normanni2 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 6 Palermo Palazzo Normanni http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1250608-palermo6/
  • 2.  
  • 3. The history of the palace goes back to the 9th century during the time of Arab rule, but probably goes back even further. The Arabs built the palace on an older Roman and Punic fortress. Over time it was abandoned by the Arabs, and the conquering Normans restored it into a sumptuous residence. During the reign of Frederick II, the Palace enjoyed a period of splendor, and became the center of cultural life in the city, as the headquarters of the “Sicilian School”. The palace houses the spectacular Cappella Palatina inside, which was also built by the Normans. The Normans came and went, and by the mid-16th century the palace was in serious decay until discovered anew by Spanish viceroys, who in 1555 began its rescue and once again turned it into a royal residence. Today it is the seat of Sicily's semi-autonomous regional government Palatul Normanzilor (Palazzo dei Normanni) - a fost ridicat î n secolul IX de conduc ă torii arabi dar probabil sarazinii au construit pe locul unei fort ăreţe romane sau cartagineze mai vechi. Abandonat de arabi a fost restaurat de normanzi care l-au transformat într-o reşedinţă cu adevărat fastuoasă, adăugând şi Capela Palatină. După plecarea normanzilor palatul decade, însă pe la 1555 viceregii spanioli îl readuc la splendoarea de odinioară transformându-l din nou în reşedinţă regală. Din 1946, palatul a găzduit Adunarea Regională Siciliană, care pretinde a fi cel mai vechi Parlament al Europei. Normanni Palazzo
  • 4. Palazzo Normanni Frederic II
  • 5.  
  • 6. Cortile Maqueda
  • 7. On entering the Palazzo complex the visitor will first enter a square courtyard surrounded by three-storyed arcades of rounded arches; it was constructed in 1600 by the viceroy Maqueda, and named Cortile Maqueda after him. The flight of steps leads to the very core of the palace, the Cappella Palatina on the first floor and the Appartamenti Reali (Royal Apartments) on the second.
  • 8. Cortile Maqueda
  • 9. Palermo, Palazzo dei Normanni, the Yellow Room. Fresco by Giuseppe Patania (1830) with Roger of Sicily Receiving The Keys of the City
  • 10. the Hall of Mirrors, sometimes called the "Yellow Hall" because of all its stunning candelabra.
  • 11. the Hall of Mirrors ( the "Yellow Hall“)
  • 12. the Hall of Mirrors ( the "Yellow Hall“)
  • 13. Gloves of Emperor Frederick II These gloves were worn by the Emperor at his coronation in 1220.
  • 14.  
  • 15. As with many of the other sumptuous garments that make up the Insignia of the Holy Roman Empire, the gloves were made in the Royal Workshops of Sicily.
  • 16. Sala Hercule
  • 17. Robe of the norman king of Sicily, Roger II, made in 1133 Sala Hercule
  • 18. Robe of the Norman king of Sicily, (Viena)
  • 19. Salone d'Ercole, from 1560, the chamber of the Sicilian parliament. The salon is named for the mammoth frescoes, created by Giuseppe Velasquez in the 19th century, depicting the Twelve Labours of Hercules
  • 20. Sala di Ercole Regrettably, little is left of those golden days, when this was the most magnificent of European medieval courts.
  • 21. These gloves were made in the early 13th century for the coronation of Emperor Frederick II..
  • 22.  
  • 23. This floor is only open on Monday and Friday when Parliament does not meet.
  • 24. Today, the Palazzo dei Normanni is the seat of Sicily’s regional government
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27. Sala di Ruggero II
  • 28. The Sala di Ruggero II is where King Roger himself slept. It's decorated with 12th-century mosaics.
  • 29. Sala di Ruggero II
  • 30. Sala di Ruggero II
  • 31. Sala di Ruggero II
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34. Sala di Ruggero II
  • 35. Sala di venti Cortile Maqueda
  • 36.  
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39. Sala di venti
  • 40.  
  • 41.  
  • 42. The flight of steps leads to the very core of the palace, the Cappella Palatina on the first floor and the Appartamenti Reali (Royal Apartments) on the second.
  • 43. Cappella Palatina: Carved figures on the paschal candelabra Cappella Palatina: Painted honeycomb ceiling
  • 44.  
  • 45. Next to the palace is the Porta Nuova, built to celebrate the arrival of Carlos V in Palermo in 1535 after a victory over the Tunisians. Designed in the Mannerist style, it was partially destroyed by lightning in 1667 and rebuilt with the addition of the conical top. More than 400 years later, it still serves as a demarcation line between the old and new city.
  • 46. S ound: Bella Sicilia canzoni amuri cummari Gian Campione Text & pictures : Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Arangement : Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda