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Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
Native compagnons (brolga1)
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Native compagnons (brolga1)

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A brolga is an Australian crane, also known as "Native Companions". The Brolga is a tall and slender bird. They have very long legs and a slender neck, both of which are mainly grey. …

A brolga is an Australian crane, also known as "Native Companions". The Brolga is a tall and slender bird. They have very long legs and a slender neck, both of which are mainly grey.
An Aboriginal legend tells of a beautiful young woman who always danced instead of working. She was turned into a tall, slender bird. Her name was Bralgah. The complicated dance of the brolga is imitated by the Aborigines in some of their dances.

Born in Sydney, 1949, Terrance Plowright has designed and built the "Dancing Brolga Fountain" at Cockle Bay is famous world wide and features as one of Sydney’s major icons for Singapore Airlines.

This fountain of dancing Brolga birds was built in 1998 and was Terrance's first water feature. "Dancing Brolga" is a spiral dancing water feature, spirals vertically in dance mode, with bird figures cast in stainless steel.


!!!!! This is a notes page presentation. If you want more information, read speaker notes or after the download, follows the steps: File-new-read only-view-notes page!!!!

Published in: Travel, Sports, Technology
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  • YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE:
    http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1159432-native-compagnons-brolga1/
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  • Merci Mireille! If you download the presentation you can see also the speaker notes and there are more information about this magnificent bird who stay with the same partner for life. I don't know why is impossible to see it on Slide share!
    I love your visits! Thank you!!!
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  • A beautiful and faithful bird ! many thanks !
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  • thank you for the gently comment for the magic bird. I recommend you one 'must see'
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uefkZdXEfNk
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  • What a magnificent bird and what a lovely presentation ,including the didgeridoo music.
    Thank you for sharing.
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  • The Brolga is a majestic Australian bird well known for its wonderful mating dance. It is found across the tropical north, southwards through north-east and east central areas, as well as central New South Wales to western Victoria. These tall birds are up to 130cm in height with a wingspan of up to 240cm. The female is shorter than the male. Brolgas have a featherless red head and a grey crown. It is thought that Brolgas are monogamous. The bond between breeding pairs is strengthened during elaborate courtship displays, which involve much dancing, leaping, wing-flapping and loud trumpeting. See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCJVmINmtZg&NR=1
  • Outside the breeding season, Brolgas form large family groups and flocks of up to a hundred birds. These groups may be partially nomadic or may stay in the same area. Some birds also migrate northwards.
  • In Aboriginal Dreamtime, there lived a young girl called Brolga who was famous for her wonderful and unique dancing style. One day, when Brolga was dancing alone with the light and shadows of a big old-coolibah tree, the evil spirit Waiwera saw her from his home in the Milky Way and wanted her as his woman. He spun himself into a willy-willy (whirlwind) and drew her up to him. Her tribe searched and found her captive. The tribe fought off Waiwera, and when the evil spirit realised he couldn't escape with the dancing girl he turned her into a Brolga so as no-one could have her. The dance of the Brolga is a traditional dance of Aborigines.
  • The Brolga is one of Australia's two crane species, and is known for its spectacular dance displays by both sexes during breeding season. � It is hard to estimate numbers in Australia but it is said to range between 20,000 and 100,000 � Brolgas eat grass, roots, insects, frogs, and lizards - the Brolga looks for food during daylight hours � Brolgas are most famous for their elegant, graceful mating dance. A couple will spread their large wings whilst facing each other and jump, dance and shake their heads!! At the same time they will often make loud trumpeting calls � The young when born are active within 2 - 3 hours. They will remain with their parents for about a year
  • Scientific name: Grus rubicunda Family: Gruidae Order: Gruiformes Featured Bird Groups Water birds
  • The Brolga is a large grey crane, with a featherless red head and grey crown. The legs are grey and there is a black dewlap under the chin. Females are shorter than males. The energetic dance performed by the Brolga is a spectacular sight. Displays may be given at any time of the year and by birds of any age. Similar species The Sarus Crane, G. antigone , another species of crane found in Australia, can be identified by its dull pink legs and the red of its head extending down the neck.
  • The Brolga is found across tropical northern Australia, southwards through north-east and east central areas, as well as central New South Wales to western Victoria. Habitat The Brolga inhabits large open wetlands, grassy plains, coastal mudflats and irrigated croplands and, less frequently, mangrove-studded creeks and estuaries. It is less common in arid and semi-arid regions, but will occur close to water. Seasonal movements Outside the breeding season, Brolgas form large family groups and flocks of up to a hundred birds. These groups may be partially nomadic or may stay in the same area. Some birds also migrate northwards.
  • Feeding Brolgas are omnivorous (feeding on both vegetable and animal matter), but primarily feed upon tubers and some crops. Some insects, molluscs, amphibians and even mice are also taken. Breeding Brolgas probably mate for life, and pair bonds are strengthened during elaborate courtship displays, which involve much dancing, leaping, wing-flapping and loud trumpeting. An isolated territory is established, and is vigorously defended by both partners. The white (blotched with brown and purple) eggs are laid in a single clutch. The nest is a large mound of vegetation on a small island in a shallow waterway or swamp. Both adults incubate the eggs and care for the young birds.
  • Living with humans Within New South Wales, Brolga numbers have been much reduced because of widespread drainage of suitable habitat for agriculture, land reclamation and water regulation, but birds are still common and widespread throughout Australia's north.
  • Life Cycle The brolgas are most famous for their mating dance. The breeding season is in November or December. A pair of brolgas spread their wings and leap and dance gracefully before mating. Brolgas stay with the same partner for life.   After mating, the female brolga lays 2 eggs in a nest. The nest is big. It is a one and a half metre platform of grass and reeds. Both parents share the task of sitting on the eggs, which hatch after about 30 days. The young stay with their parents for about a year.  
  • The Legend of the Brolga An Aboriginal legend tells of a beautiful young woman who always danced instead of working. She was turned into a tall, slender bird. Her name was Bralgah. The complicated dance of the brolga is imitated by the Aborigines in some of their dances.
  • The Legend of the Brolga An Aboriginal legend tells of a beautiful young woman who always danced instead of working. She was turned into a tall, slender bird. Her name was Bralgah. The complicated dance of the brolga is imitated by the Aborigines in some of their dances. � Many brolgas are lost due to the following main threats: loss of wetland habitats, red foxes and incidental poisoning   There is an Aboriginal legend that says girls who do too much dancing and not enough working, are changed into brolgas. (Since brolgas are like to dance a lot!) The Aborigines copied the brolgas' dance and did it themselves
  • � A brolga is an Australian crane, also known as "Native Companions" � It is one of two types of cranes found in Australia, the other being the Sarus Crane
  • One Tree is a location on the Cobb Highway on the flat plain between Hay and Booligal in the Riverina district of New South Wales, Australia. In 1862 a public house was built there – the One Tree Inn – and the locality developed as a coach changing-stage and watering-place between the Murrumbidgee and Lachlan rivers. One Tree village was surveyed and proclaimed in 1882, though the location remained as just an amenity on the plain, centred on the hotel. The existing One Tree Hotel is the second building of that name to occupy the site. The first hotel was destroyed by fire in 1903. The hotel was re-built in the same manner as the original structure (by the provisions of the insurance policy). The license of the One Tree Hotel was relinquished in 1942 by its last publican, Frank McQuade. The One Tree Hotel is an important historical building, providing a tangible link to the heyday of pastoral settlement in the Riverina. The name ‘One Tree’ derives from the presence of a large gum tree on the otherwise treeless plain (called the One Tree Plain). The landmark tree was destroyed by a storm in January 1900.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Brolga
    • 2. a continent, a country, an island
    • 3. The Brolga, Grus rubicunda, is a majestic Australian bird well known for its wonderful mating dance
    • 4. It is found across the tropical north, southwards through north-east and east central areas, as well as central New South Wales to western Victoria
    • 5. These tall birds are up to 130cm in height with a wingspan of up to 240cm. The female is shorter than the male. Brolgas have a featherless red head and a grey crown.
    • 6. An Aboriginal legend tells of a beautiful young woman who always danced instead of working. She was turned into a tall, slender bird. Her name was Bralgah.
    • 7. A brolga is an Australian crane, also known as "Native Companions"
    • 8.  
    • 9.  
    • 10.  
    • 11.  
    • 12.  
    • 13.  
    • 14. Sound : One tree plain - Mark Atkins and Janawirri Yiparrka Pictures: internet Arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu

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