http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-2044775-myanmar15-bagan/
Sulamani Temple is one of Bagan's premier temple attractions. The name
itself means Crowning Jewel or Small Ruby. It was t...
“In order that
men might follow
the Path and
reach fruition in
Nibbana, he built
a great work of
merit with two
hollow sto...
A market at the
entrance
to
Sulamani. Like
other temples,
merchants had
stores right up
to the main
door.
Glazed terracotta plaques of different sizes and patterns decorate the terraces
The
name
chosen
—
Culamcini in Pali, meaning
"Crowning Jewel"- was a
particularly sacred one, being
the name of the reliqu...
The chronicles also record
how Narapatisithu settled on
a site for the temple. It is said
that
once,
when
Narapatisithu wa...
The Sulamani consists of
two-story, each of which is
square in plan, with porches
on all four sides but with the
eastern
p...
A side view of the Buddha
image with men applying
gold leaf
A Buddha image is the
principle object of worship in
the
templ...
In the ground storey, a vaulted corridor
runs around the central pile of solid
brickwork, each side of which has a seated
...
Two narrow flights
of steps set into the
thick walls lead to
the terrace above
the eastern porch.
From there, two
broad st...
The inner walls of the temple were once decorated with paintings, but
they are now obliterated or overlaid with more recen...
Sulamani Temple,
known as the
Crowning Jewel,
is one of the most
attractive and the
most-frequently
visited temples in
Bag...
Sulamani Temple is a
prime example of
later,
more
sophisticated temple
styles, with better
internal
lighting,
similar
to
t...
There is much to see in
Sulamani Temple. Carved
stucco
on
moldings,
pediments
and
pilasters
stands for some of Bagan’s
fin...
During the kingdom's height
between the 11th and 13th
centuries,
over
10,000
Buddhist temples, pagodas
and
monasteries
wer...
Bagan, located in
an active
earthquake zone,
had suffered from
many
earthquakes over
the ages, with
over 400
recorded
eart...
Text: Internet
Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu & Internet
Copyright: All the images belong to their authors

Presentation: Sand...
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
Bagan Sulamani temple
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Bagan Sulamani temple

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From the 9th to 13th centuries, Bagan was the capital of the Kingdom of Pagan, the first kingdom to unify the regions that would later constitute modern Myanmar. During the kingdom's height between the 11th and 13th centuries, over 10,000 Buddhist temples, pagodas and monasteries were constructed in the Bagan plains alone, of which the remains of over 2200 temples and pagodas still survive to the present day.

Published in: Travel, Spiritual
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  • Thank you Mihran for adding this presentation to your favourites, thank you.
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  • Muchísimas gracias por tan interesante explicación. Prometo no molestar más. Besos, Pilar
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  • @johndemi
    Thank you Friend, Thank you!
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  • @1456789
    Gracias Pilar.
    Los monjes en Birmania son sagrados. Cada niño entra por primera vez como novicio al monasterio de su aldea en torno a los 6-8 años de edad, en una ceremonia conocida como shinpyu, que sería equivalente a la primera comuniónen el cristianismo. Es una corta estancia de un mes, y a lo largo de sus vidas es más que probable que vuelvan a él por estancias más largas, que se hagan novicios, que se ordenen o, que pasado un tiempo como monjes ordenados regresen a la vida civil, pues esta no es una decisión de por vida, y el tiempo dedicado al estudio y pasado en el monasterio son méritos acumulados para el individuo. Respecto a las mujeres, también pueden seguir el camino de la religión, pero no se espera de ellas que lo hagan. En una ceremonia de ordenación parecida a la de los hombres, toman los votos y dentro del ritual, se afeitan la cabeza, se perforan las orejas y toman las togas rosas. Este colectivo femenino no recibe tantas ayudas y donaciones como el de los monjes. Ellas, además de su entrega a la oración y el estudio, deben cultivar la tierra y proveer para hacer sostenible su comunidad
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  • El Templo de Sulamani es precioso, me gustan muchísimo sus pinturas. Me da pena pensar que pudo haber 10.000 templos y solo quedan 2200, con lo bonitos que son. Los niños que van vestidos con esa tela roja han entrado en los templos para ser monjes, no? y ya no pueden volverse atrás, tienen que quedarse para siempre ?
    Miles de gracias Michaella por esta presentación tan maravillosa y por la lata que te doy. Pilar
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Bagan Sulamani temple

  1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-2044775-myanmar15-bagan/
  2. 2. Sulamani Temple is one of Bagan's premier temple attractions. The name itself means Crowning Jewel or Small Ruby. It was the first and most important temple of the late period (1170-1300) of Bagan. It was one of many temples and stupas built by Narapatisithu.
  3. 3. “In order that men might follow the Path and reach fruition in Nibbana, he built a great work of merit with two hollow storeys and called it Sulamani." Thus do the chronicles record this act of merit by King Narapatisithu (1174- 1211)..
  4. 4. A market at the entrance to Sulamani. Like other temples, merchants had stores right up to the main door.
  5. 5. Glazed terracotta plaques of different sizes and patterns decorate the terraces
  6. 6. The name chosen — Culamcini in Pali, meaning "Crowning Jewel"- was a particularly sacred one, being the name of the reliquary monument in the celestial abode of Tavatimsa in which was enshrined the holy hair of the Buddha when, as Prince Siddhattha, he cut it off to renounce the world and set out on a life of asceticism. Guardian spirit is believed to be the protector of the Temple
  7. 7. The chronicles also record how Narapatisithu settled on a site for the temple. It is said that once, when Narapatisithu was returning from climbing Mount Tuywin, he chanced upon a ruby shining radiantly in a hollow. He exclaimed, "It is a sign for me to make a work of merit here!", and, making men fill up the hollow, he built the Sulamani there.
  8. 8. The Sulamani consists of two-story, each of which is square in plan, with porches on all four sides but with the eastern porch extending farther than the others. The upper storey is set back from the lower, but it is of the same height. Both story are surmounted by receding terraces, with crenellated parapets and small stupas at the corners.
  9. 9. A side view of the Buddha image with men applying gold leaf A Buddha image is the principle object of worship in the temple. To gain increased merit, Buddhists often apply squares of gold leaf to the statue. Popular places on the Buddha’s body are the forehead, his lap or his arms, clear for all to see.
  10. 10. In the ground storey, a vaulted corridor runs around the central pile of solid brickwork, each side of which has a seated image of the Buddha on a pedestal.
  11. 11. Two narrow flights of steps set into the thick walls lead to the terrace above the eastern porch. From there, two broad stairways lead to the upper storey. Here too a vaulted corridor runs around the central block, which has a recess on the eastern side to form an image chamber.
  12. 12. The inner walls of the temple were once decorated with paintings, but they are now obliterated or overlaid with more recent paintings of no great artistic merit.
  13. 13. Sulamani Temple, known as the Crowning Jewel, is one of the most attractive and the most-frequently visited temples in Bagan
  14. 14. Sulamani Temple is a prime example of later, more sophisticated temple styles, with better internal lighting, similar to the Thatbyinnyu Temple and Htilominlo Temple.
  15. 15. There is much to see in Sulamani Temple. Carved stucco on moldings, pediments and pilasters stands for some of Bagan’s finest ornamental work and is in fairly good condition. Buddha images face the four directions from ground floor. Glazed plaques around the base and terraces are also still visible with many different murals.
  16. 16. During the kingdom's height between the 11th and 13th centuries, over 10,000 Buddhist temples, pagodas and monasteries were constructed in the Bagan plains alone, of which the remains of over 2200 temples and pagodas still survive to the present day.
  17. 17. Bagan, located in an active earthquake zone, had suffered from many earthquakes over the ages, with over 400 recorded earthquakes between 1904 and 1975. Today, 2229 temples and pagodas remain. Bagan today is a main tourist destination in the country's nascent tourism industry, which has long been the target of various boycott campaigns.
  18. 18. Text: Internet Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu & Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound: Hlaing Win Maung - Wheel od Dharma
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