Mexico wood carving

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Cuanajo (pop. 8,000) is a village of wood carvers who make brightly painted pine furniture. On the road as you enter, and around the pleasant, tree-shaded main plaza, you'll see storefronts with …

Cuanajo (pop. 8,000) is a village of wood carvers who make brightly painted pine furniture. On the road as you enter, and around the pleasant, tree-shaded main plaza, you'll see storefronts with colorful furniture inside and on the street. Parrots, plants, the sun, the moon, and faces are carved on the furniture. Furniture is also sold at a cooperative on the main plaza. Here you'll also find soft-spoken women who weave tapestries and thin belts on waist looms. Everything is for sale. It is open daily from 9am to 6pm. Festival day in Cuanajo is September 8, which honor their patron saint, La Virgen María (Our Lady of the Nativity)
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  • The Greek historian Herodotus wrote that, at the height of its glory, Ecbatana was a shining jewel of the ancient world with buildings plated with precious metals and seven layers of city walls, the inner two being coated in silver and gold. From the time of Alexander, the city suffered many invasions and lost much of its wealth and importance though it remained the summer capital during Parthian and Sassanid times.
  • Alebrijes are brightly colored Mexican folk art sculptures of fantastical creatures. The first alebrijes, along with use of the term, originated with Pedro Linares . After dreaming the creatures while sick in the 1930s, he began to create what he saw in cardboard and paper mache. His work caught the attention of a gallery owner in Cuernavaca and later, the artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo . Linares was originally from México City (DF), he was born June 29, 1906 in México City and never moved out of México City, he died January 25, 1992. Then in the 1980s, British Filmmaker, Judith Bronowski, arranged an itinerant demonstration workshop in U.S.A. participating Pedro Linares , Manuel Jiménez and a textil artisan Maria Sabina from Oaxaca. Although the Oaxaca valley area already had a history of carving animal and other types of figures from wood, it was at this time, when Bronowski's workshop took place when artisans from Oaxaca knew the alebrijes paper mache sculptures. Then Linares’ designs were adapted to the carving of a local wood called copal and on family visits, demonstrated his designs there. The Oaxaca valley area already had a history of carving animal and other types of figures from wood, and Linares’ designs were adapted to the carving of a local wood called copal . This adaptation was pioneered by Arrazola native Manuel Jiménez .
  • This version of the craft has since spread to a number of other towns, most notably San Martín Tilcajete and La Unión Tejalapan , become a major source of income for the area, especially for Tilcajete. The success of the craft, however, has led to the depletion of the native copal trees. Attempts to remedy this, with reforestation efforts and management of wild copal trees has only had limited success. The three towns most closely associated with alebrije production in Oaxaca have produced a number of notable artisans such as Manuel Jiménez, Jacobo Angeles, Martin Sandiego, Julia Fuentes and Miguel Sandiego.
  • “ Se me olvidó otra vez" (written by Juan Gabriel) is the first radio single release and twelfth track from Maná 's second live album , Maná MTV Unplugged in 1999. "Se Me Olvidó Otra Vez" is a song originally written by Juan Gabriel , from his Juan Gabriel con el Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlán album in 1990 and later re-recorded the song on his 2001 album, Por Los Siglos . The original single peaked at #1 in Mexico.

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  • 1. wood carvings México http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1293386-mexico-wood-carving/
  • 2. Cuanajo (pop. 8,000) is a village of wood carvers who make brightly painted pine furniture. On the road as you enter, and around the pleasant, tree-shaded main plaza, you'll see storefronts with colorful furniture inside and on the street.
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5. Wood Carvers of San Antonio Arrazola
  • 6.  
  • 7. Parrots, plants, the sun, the moon, and faces are carved on the furniture. Furniture is also sold at a cooperative on the main plaza. Here you'll also find soft-spoken women who weave tapestries and thin belts on waist looms
  • 8.  
  • 9. Everything is for sale. It is open daily from 9am to 6pm. Festival day in Cuanajo is September 8, which honor their patron saint, La Virgen María (Our Lady of the Nativity)
  • 10.  
  • 11. corner detail of a finely carved and painted dish cupboard from Cuanajo
  • 12.  
  • 13. Colorfully beautiful, whimsical, or elegant, the best of Mexico's crafts
  • 14. Colorful Mexican themes decorate this queen-size hand-carved and hand-painted headboard
  • 15. one detailed scene from a Cuanajo-made table top
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  • 21.  
  • 22. Alevriches Monte Alban
  • 23. Alebrijes (alevriches) are brightly colored Mexican folk art sculptures of fantastical creatures. Most Oaxacan artisans simply call them figuras "wooden figures”
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  • 26. Chinanteco produces these whimsical wood carvings (Oaxaca)
  • 27. Varios Alebrijes en el Museo de las Artesanías, Huatulco, Oaxaca
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  • 29. S ound: Se me olvidó otra vez – Plácido Domingo con Bebu Silvetti México Background: Caracol, mexican rug Pictures: Internet Sanda Foişoreanu (slide 21,22) Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Background: Caracol, mexican rug Arangement : Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda