Going to the Opera
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Going to the Opera

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  • "The construction of the beautiful freestanding, sculptural tripartite Opera House was one of the longest contractual sagas of the century. Sadly, architect Jorn Utzon became the scapegoat of a scandalous political affair and in 1966 withdrew from his project. Sitting on Bennelong Point, virtually in the Harbour and overlooked by the great Sydney Harbour Bridge, the Opera House is completely exposed, as three-dimensional as the orange segments its forms are based on. It is all roofs with an imposing base. These were made possible by Ove Arup. Originally the winner of an international open competition in 1957, it was a scheme that broke most of the rules. It was finally completed in August 1973 by other hands under the direction of Peter Hall."   — Dennis Sharp. Twentieth Century Architecture: a Visual History.Sydney Opera House
  • Inaugurated in 1973, the Sydney Opera House is a great architectural work of the 20th century that brings together multiple strands of creativity and innovation in both architectural form and structural design. A great urban sculpture set in a remarkable water scape, at the tip of a peninsula projecting into Sydney Harbour, the building has had an enduring influence on architecture. The Sydney Opera House comprises three groups of interlocking vaulted ‘shells’ which roof two main performance halls and a restaurant. These shell-structures are set upon a vast platform and are surrounded by terrace areas that function as pedestrian concourses. In 1957, when the project of the Sydney Opera House was awarded by an international jury to Danish architect Jørn Utzon, it marked a radically new approach to construction.
  • Writers Walk Sydney Underfoot and downtrodden? Actually the writers — with their metal plaques embedded along the walkway around Sydney's Circular Quay — are being honored, and their lives and works celebrated, on the Sydney Writers Walk. You will find these plaques from around the International Passenger Terminal on West Circular Quay, down to the walkway between the ferry jetties and the train station, and all the way to the side of the Sydney Opera House forecourt on East Circular Quay. The writers represented on Writers Walk include not only Australians but also those who lived in, or visited, Australia, such as D H Lawrence, Rudyard Kipling and Mark Twain. The plaques, arranged here in alphabetical order by surname, provide interesting, informative reading in capsule form. Photographs of the Writers Walk plaques were taken by Larry Rivera.
  • Contrary to what its name would lead you to believe, Sydney Opera House is actually composed of six smaller venues.  The two largest are Opera Theatre and Concert Hall, which reside in the two larger sets of shells.  Three smaller theaters, Drama Theatre, Playhouse, and Studio, are situated along the western side of the building and in the Utzon Room on the eastern side.  The smaller set of shells houses the sixth venue, award-winning Guillaume Bennelong restaurant.  There’s a seventh space, The Forecourt, which is used to host many free community events and large scale outdoor performances.
  •   The Opera house is built on a site of 2.2 hectares and the building covers 1.8 hectares The complex building took 14 years to complete - March 1959 to mid 1973 The Opera House in Australia has nearly 1000 rooms including five main auditoriums, five rehearsal studios, sixty dressing rooms, four restaurants, six theatre bars, extensive foyer and lounge areas The acoustics of the Concert Hall are highly regarded internationally. The contributing volume factor is 26,400 cubic meters. The Grand Organ in the Concert Hall is the largest mechanical tracker action organ in the world with 10,500 pipes, built by an Australian named Ronald Sharp.
  • The idea and plan that Sydney needed a better Performing Arts Centre was originated by Sir Eugene Goosens who was the Chief Conductor of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra and Director of the NSW Conservatorium of Music (in 1947) An international competition was run for the design of the building and out of 233 designs, Jorn Utzon (born in 1918) - a Danish architect’s design was chosen
  • The Annual Giving Program was developed to ensure that Sydney Opera House continues to play its role as the creative and cultural fulcrum of Australia. The financial support that we receive from our generous donors raises much needed funds for our four key areas of investment: Outstanding Live Performance; Youth and Education Programs; Community and Access Projects and Preservation and Development of our World Heritage listed masterpiece. Modification and development of Sydney Opera House is a reality that Jørn Utzon readily acknowledged and supported. Utzon was re-engaged to develop a set of Design Principles in 1999 to act as a guide for all future changes to the building. Our most recent upgrades include work on the Western Foyers Project, which is due to be completed in 2009. This project will see wonderful new wheelchair positions and a lift installed linking the new Playhouse, Studio and Drama Theatre foyers with the car park level saving our patrons the need to negotiate nearly 200 stairs. These changes will ensure the experience of visiting the House is enjoyable for all members of the community.
  • The Opera House houses the following performance venues: The Concert Hall, with 2,679 seats, is the home of the Sydney Symphony and used by a large number of other concert presenters. It contains the Sydney Opera House Grand Organ, the largest mechanical tracker action organ in the world, with over 10,000 pipes The Opera Theatre, a proscenium theatre with 1,507 seats, is the Sydney home of Opera Australia and The Australian Ballet. The Drama Theatre, a proscenium theatre with 544 seats, is used by the Sydney Theatre Company and other dance and theatrical presenters. The Playhouse, an end-stage theatre with 398 seats. The Studio, a flexible space with a maximum capacity of 400 people, depending on configuration. The Utzon Room, a small multi-purpose venue, seating up to 210. The Forecourt, a flexible open-air venue with a wide range of configuration options, including the possibility of utilising the Monumental Steps as audience seating, used for a range of community events and major outdoor performances. The Forecourt will be closed to visitors and performances 2011–2014 to construct a new entrance tunnel to a rebuilt loading dock for the Opera Theatre.
  • Other areas (for example the northern and western foyers) are also used for performances on an occasional basis. Venues at the Sydney Opera House are also used for conferences, ceremonies, and social functions.
  • "There is no doubt that the Sydney Opera House is his masterpiece. It is one of the great iconic buildings of the 20th century, an image of great beauty that has become known throughout the world – a symbol for not only a city, but a whole country and continent.“PRITZKER PRIZE CITATION 2003 Sydney Opera House was inscribed in the World Heritage List in June 2007 : "The expert evaluation report to the World Heritage Committee stated: "…it stands by itself as one of the indisputable masterpieces of human creativity, not only in the 20th century but in the history of humankind."
  • To celebrate the creative genius and enduring spirit of Jørn Utzon, a State Memorial was held at the Sydney Opera House on Wednesday 25th March 2009 at 11am "On behalf of the people of Sydney, New South Wales and Australia, we simply say 'thank you' for visiting your vision and masterpiece to our city.  We are forever in your debt." THE HON. NATHAN REES MP, PREMIER NSW "I think back on my life with my father with great joy and love. To be allowed to spend so much time together with such a remarkable man, father and architect, has been a great privilege indeed." JAN UTZON, 2008
  • The Sydney Opera House opened the way for the immensely complex geometries of some modern architecture. The design was one of the first examples of the use of computer-aided design to design complex shapes. The design techniques developed by Utzon and Arup for the Sydney Opera House have been further developed and are now used for architecture, such as works of Gehry and blobitecture, as well as most reinforced concrete structures. The design is also one of the first in the world to use araldite to glue the precast structural elements together and proved the concept for future use.
  • Sydney Opera House was inscribed in the World Heritage List in June 2007: "The expert evaluation report to the World Heritage Committee stated: "…it stands by itself as one of the indisputable masterpieces of human creativity, not only in the 20th century but in the history of humankind."

Going to the Opera Going to the Opera Presentation Transcript

  • GOING TO THE OPERA SYDNEY http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1181322-going-to-the-opera/
  • GOING TO THE OPERA
  • Situated on Bennelong Point in Sydney Harbour, with parkland to its south and close to the equally famous Sydney Harbour Bridge, the building and its surroundings form an iconic Australian image.
  • Macquarie Street extends from Hyde Park to the Sydney Opera House. The Golden Fleece (after the Greek mythology) to honour the wool industry
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  • Tom Bass - Research (1959) East Circular Quay Tom Bass is considered to be Australia's most successful sculptor and has created some of the best loved, most talked about and symbolic sculptures in Australia
  • Because of its focal point, Circular Quay is an extremely busy place and there always are crowds
  • Along East Circular Quay are restaurants, shops, sidewalk cafes, all the way up to Bennelong Point where the Opera House is. Circular Quay is a major city terminal for buses, trains and ferries.
  • Circular Quay is at the foot of the central business district and the older, historic end of the city.
  • Metal plaques are embedded in the Circular Quay walkway from near the Overseas Passenger Terminal down to the jetties and up to the forecourt of the Sydney Opera House: this is the Sydney Writers Walk.
  • Circular Quay is built around Sydney Cove and is considered by many to be the focal point of the city. The first European settlement in Australia grew around the Tank Stream, which now runs underground into the harbour here. For many years this was the shipping centre of Sydney, but it's now both a commuting hub and a recreational space.
  • the plaques of the Sydney Writers Walk contain interesting and pertinent passages from the works of Australian and international writers honored there.
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  • The writers represented on Writers Walk include not only Australians but also those who lived in, or visited Australia, such as D H Lawrence, Rudyard Kipling and Mark Twain.
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  • The quay is a vibrant, bustling place with ferries leaving every few minutes to different parts of the harbour. There are great views of the Harbour Bridge, a short distance away.
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  • The Sydney Harbour Bridge, (nicknamed "The Coat Hanger" because of its arch-based design), is a steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore.
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  • The dramatic view of the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is an iconic image of both Sydney and Australia.
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  • The Opera Bar is Sydney’s best open-air bar
  • The site of the first British colony in Australia, Sydney was established in 1788 at Sydney Cove by Arthur Phillip, commodore of the First Fleet as a penal colony. The city is built on hills surrounding Port Jackson which is commonly known as Sydney Harbour, where the iconic Sydney Opera House and the Harbour Bridge feature prominently.
  • “I like to be on the edge of the possible” Jorn Utzon
  • “I like to be on the edge of the possible” Jorn Utzon
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  • This time we don’t have to wear black tie to go to the Opera and can go wearing anything we like because we are tourists.
  • The city received 22.6 million domestic visitors and almost three million international visitors last year and...the most well known attractions include the Sydney Opera House
  • The Sydney Opera House is the busiest performing arts centre in the world with an average of 3,000 events each year attracting audiences totaling up to two million. Performances include symphony concerts, chamber music, opera, ballet and dance, choral concerts, pop, jazz, folk concerts, variety shows, contemporary and modern performing arts
  • "There is no doubt that the Sydney Opera House is his masterpiece. It is one of the great iconic buildings of the 20th century, an image of great beauty that has become known throughout the world – a symbol for not only a city, but a whole country and continent."
  • The Opera House in Australia has nearly 1000 rooms including five main auditoriums, five rehearsal studios, sixty dressing rooms, four restaurants, six theatre bars, extensive foyer and lounge areas It was opened by Queen Elizabeth II on October 20, 1973. The opening performance was Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9
  • The acoustics of the Concert Hall are highly regarded internationally. The contributing volume factor is 26,400 cubic meters. The Grand Organ in the Concert Hall is the largest mechanical tracker action organ in the world with 10,500 pipes, built by an Australian named Ronald Sharp.
  • Located in the southern sail of Sydney Opera House, Guillaume at Bennelong Restaurant offers contemporary Australian cuisine with a classical French influence
  • The whole building weighs 161,000 tonnes supported on 580 concrete piers sunk down to 25m below sea level The roof weighs 27,230 tonnes made up of 1,056,056 Swedish ceramic tiles
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  • “The light didn’t know how beautiful it was, until it was reflected off this building.”
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  • Gioacchino Rossini - O verture to “la gazza ladra” Cecilia Bartoli - Gioacchino Rossini - La Cenerentola Text: Internet Pictures and arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda