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From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
From east to west coast1
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From east to west coast1

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE (You have a link on the first slide): http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1385092-east-to-west1/ …

YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE (You have a link on the first slide): http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1385092-east-to-west1/

Thank you!
The journey from the east to the west coast through Arthur's Pass is spectacular by road, or rail, and the Transalpine train, which makes the journey across and back each day, has an open-air viewing carriage to make the most of the views.
Today we arrive at Railway Station at Darfield for the TranzAlpine train

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  • Thank you Nikos for coming and for comment! and for your kind wishes!
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  • Congratulations dear Michaela for your great work and many thanks for sharing!!!. Have a good night ! Best greetings from Greece. I wish you also a wonderful weekend. Nikos
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  • gracias Pilar, gracias!
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  • Debe ser un pais muy bonito, preciosas las fotos y la música. Gracias Michaela.
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  • thank you Johndemi for your attention and permanent support!
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  • Kiwi is the nickname used internationally for people from New Zealand, as well as being a relatively common self-reference. The name derives from the kiwi, a flightless bird, which is native to, and the national symbol of, New Zealand. The usage is not offensive, being treated with pride and endearment as a uniquely recognizable term for the people of New Zealand.
  • History The first New Zealanders to be widely known as Kiwis were the military. The Regimental Signs for all New Zealand regiments feature the kiwi, including those that fought in the Second Boer War, then with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps in World War I. Much of the interaction between regiments and locals was done under the respective Regimental Sign, and the kiwi came to mean first the men of regiments and then all New Zealanders. Due to the relative isolation of New Zealand, many troops stayed in Europe (particularly at Beacon Hill, near Bulford on the Salisbury Plain, where they carved a chalk kiwi into the hill in 1918) for months or years until transport home could be arranged. The Oxford English Dictionary gives the first use of the 'Kiwi' to mean 'New Zealander' in 1918, in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force Chronicles. The nickname 'Kiwis' for New Zealand servicemen eventually became common usage in all war theatres
  • Following World War II the term was gradually attributed to all New Zealanders and today, throughout the world they are referred to as Kiwis, as well as often referring to themselves that way. Spelling of the word Kiwi, when used to describe the people, is often capitalized, and takes the plural form Kiwis. The bird's name is spelt with a lower-case k and, being a word of Māori origin, normally stays as kiwi when pluralized. Thus, two Kiwis refers to two people, whereas two kiwi refers to two birds. This linguistic nicety is well exemplified by the BNZ Save the Kiwi Conservation Trust, which uses the slogan "Kiwis saving kiwi".
  • Transcript

    • 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1385092-east-to-west1/
    • 2. Kiwi is the nickname usedinternationally for peoplefrom New Zealand, as wellas being a relativelycommon self-reference.The name derives from thekiwi, a flightless bird, whichis native to, and thenational symbol of, NewZealand. The usage is notoffensive, being treatedwith pride and endearmentas a uniquely recognizableterm for the people of NewZealand.
    • 3. The journey from the east tothe west coast throughArthurs Pass is spectacularby road, or rail, and theTransalpine train, whichmakes the journey acrossand back each day, has anopen-air viewing carriage tomake the most of the views
    • 4. About 10,000 houses and nearly 1,000 commercial buildings will have tobe demolished as a result of the powerful earthquake who slammed NewZealands city of Christchurch on 22.02.2011, killing at least 65 people
    • 5. There are over 70 million sheep in New Zealandand they are raised throughout the entirecountry. Sheep are raised for both their wool andalso for their meat. There are 23 kinds of sheepthat are raised in New Zealand and each onehas a different kind of wool.
    • 6. Red tussock and Toi toi
    • 7. Sited beside the Rakaia Gorge and in the lee of the towering Mt Hutt mountain range,Terrace Downs is nested at the base of Mt Hutt in the Canterbury foothills, an hour out ofChristchurch and the heart of New Zealands South Island high country.Each of the Terrace Villas offer commanding views of the golf course andmountains beyond
    • 8. Terrace Downs, Rakaia Gorge, Mt Hutt
    • 9. There are 23 kinds of sheep that are raised in New Zealand and each one has a different kind of wool. For example, the Merino sheep makes very fine and soft wool and the Coopworth sheep makes very coarse wool. The very coarse wool is used to make blankets and carpets while the soft wool is used to make soft and expensive sweaters. Merino sheepDrysdale ram
    • 10. The Merino wool is now combined with the fur from the possum(which does not look like anAmerican possum) to make a very soft and very warm yarn.
    • 11. New Zealand HuntawayTed DogTo make a living, asheep farmer musthave between 3,000and 4,000 sheep onhis farm
    • 12. Darfield, located 35 kilometres west from the outskirts of Christchurch, New Zealand on State Highway 73 (The great Alpine highway) is the main town between Christchurch and the West Coast. Its population (2001 census) is 1,362. The town is on the Midland railway line, route of the famous TranzAlpine train service. It is often called "The township under the Norwest arch", in reference to a characteristic weather phenomenon, which often creates an arch of cloud in an otherwise clear sky to the west of the township. This is caused by the condensation of water particles channeledIlex. Holly berries upwards over the Southern Alps.
    • 13. Ilex. Holly berries
    • 14. Text: Internet Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu Doina Grigoraş Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authorsSound: Maori Kapa Haka Arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu Hayley Westenra - The Mummers Dance www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Maori Kapa Haka - Karanga Aoteroa

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