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Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney
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Featherdale Wildlife Park Sydney

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A common myth about the kangaroo’s English name is that ‘kangaroo’ was a Guugu Yimidhirr phrase for “I don’t understand you.” The story starts from once upon a time, Lieutenant Cook (apparently was a …

A common myth about the kangaroo’s English name is that ‘kangaroo’ was a Guugu Yimidhirr phrase for “I don’t understand you.” The story starts from once upon a time, Lieutenant Cook (apparently was a British) was exploring Australia and stumbled upon kangaroo. He had never seen kangaroo before so he was curious to ask a nearby local what the animal was called. Being a British, Cook of course spoke in English and amazingly he actually expected the local to understand his language. As expected based on common sense, the local didn’t understand and threw Cook a word “Kangaroo”, meaning “I don’t understand you”. Incredibly Cook really believed that the local understood English and he took it as the name of the animal, thus, Kangaroo. Poor kangaroo… which has been called “I don’t understand you” for centuries.

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  • Good presentation ,I took some overseas visitors there a couple of months ago and they enjoyed it.
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  • Do you know when you don’t understand someone, instead of saying ‘I beg your pardon’, you can actually say ‘Kangaroo’? No joke, you can try it when you have a chance! But probably only Guugu Yimithirr , Australian Aboriginal tribe of Far North Queensland, would understand it. A common myth about the kangaroo’s English name is that ‘kangaroo’ was a Guugu Yimidhirr phrase for “I don’t understand you.” The story starts from once upon a time, Lieutenant Cook (apparently was a British) was exploring Australia and stumbled upon kangaroo. He had never seen kangaroo before so he was curious to ask a nearby local what the animal was called. Being a British, Cook of course spoke in English and amazingly he actually expected the local to understand his language. As expected based on common sense, the local didn’t understand and threw Cook a word “Kangaroo”, meaning “I don’t understand you”. Incredibly Cook really believed that the local understood English and he took it as the name of the animal, thus, Kangaroo. Poor kangaroo… which has been called “I don’t understand you” for centuries. I didn’t make up the story, ok? The Kangaroo myth was debunked in the 1970s by linguist John B. Haviland in his research with the Guugu Yimidhirr people.
  • Transcript

    • 1. New South Wales is Australia's most populous state, contains one third (33%) of Australia's population and is located in the south-east of the country. The colony of New South Wales was founded in 1788 and originally comprised much of the Australian mainland, as well as Van Diemen's Land, Lord Howe Island and Norfolk Island in addition to the area currently referred to as the state of New South Wales, which was formed during Federation in 1901. New South Wales http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1181288-featherdale-wildlife-park-sydney/
    • 2. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welsh or New South Welshmen. New South Wales's largest city and capital is Sydney.
    • 3. Established on 7 acres of land originally purchased by Charles and Marjorie Wigg in 1953, Featherdale has evolved from a poultry farm into one of the best privately own wildlife parks in Australia Featherdale Wildlife Park is in the western Sydney suburb of Doonside, about 40 minutes by road from the Sydney centre.  While the Featherdale Wildlife Park is small in size, it is big on thrills. In addition to seeing wallabies, kangaroos, and koalas on a visit to this wonderful park, visitors can view crocodiles, see what the dingoes are up to, check out some wombats, and spy on some curious emus. Tasmanian devils are also on display.
    • 4. Admission fees: Adults: $23.00 Children (3 - 15 yrs): $12.50 Family Pass (2 adults and up to 4 children): $68.00 Students: $18.00 Pensioners: $18.00 Seniors Card: $16.00  
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    • 10. Wombats are Australian marsupials; they are short-legged, muscular quadrupeds, approximately 1 meter in length with a very short tail. They are found in forested and mountainous areas of south-eastern Australia and Tasmania.
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    • 12. The name wombat comes from the Eora who were the original inhabitants of the Sydney area.
    • 13. The Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) is the largest bird native to Australia and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius. It is also the second-largest extant bird in the world by height, after its ratite relative, the ostrich
    • 14. Here there are over 230 varieties of birds, one of the largest collections in Australia.
    • 15. Australian King-Parrot (Alisterus scapularis)
    • 16. More than 2000 native animals such as kangaroos, koalas, emus, wombats, reptiles and birds in a bush setting are said to be in the park. Little (Blue or Fairy) Penguin Little Penguins breed across southern Australia and the islands of New Zealand, and it is estimated that their world breeding population is approximately 350-600,000 birds.
    • 17. The species is not endangered but some populations are threatened. Introduced mammalian predators appear to be the most significant threat with foxes, dogs and possibly ferrets and stoats (in New Zealand), being implicated in a number of colony extinctions and declines.
    • 18. The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a carnivorous marsupial of the family Dasyuridae now found in the wild only in the Australian island state of Tasmania
    • 19.  
    • 20. A wallaby is an marsupial that is smaller than a kangaroo. The most obvious difference between the wallaby and the kangaroo is size. As a rule, the kangaroo is generally much larger than the wallaby Another simple way to tell a wallaby and a kangaroo apart is by their coloring. A wallaby's coat is usually brighter with two to three different colors. The kangaroo's coat is usually less splashy and more uniform, with muted colors like brown or gray. They were introduced in New Zealand, where they are seen as a pest and are often hunted.
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    • 24. The kangaroo has more height between its ankles and knees, which makes its legs seem out of proportion to its body. The kangaroo's legs are built for speed on open terrain. The wallaby's more compact legs are built for agility in forested areas.
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    • 27. The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia, and the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae. Koala range (brown — native, red — introduced)
    • 28. The koalas of South Australia were largely exterminated during the early part of the 20th century, but the state has since been repopulated with Victorian stock. The koala is not found in Tasmania or Western Australia
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    • 30. Wikipedia
    • 31. Sydney Sound : Parrot song Didgeridoo - Animal Gossip Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu Featherdale Wildlife Park Arrangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda

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