Farah Ossouli5

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Thank you!
Motto on the official site of Farah Ossouli.
Out beyond ideas
of right doing and wrong doing,
There is a field
I'll meet you there.
When the soul lies down in that grass
The world is too full to talk about.
Ideas, languages, even the phrase each other,
Does not make any sense.

Jelaluddin Rumi, 1205-1273

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  •     Ossouli, Farah Born in 1953, Zanjan, Iran Education: 1971 Diploma in painting, Girl's Sc hool of Fine Arts, Tehran 1977 B.A in graphic design, Faculty of Fine Arts, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran Teaching experiences: 1972-1977 Design Studio, Tehran 1981- 1987 Moaser Studio, Tehran   Farah Ossouli is an Iranian artist currently living in Tehran. She first started painting almost 42 years ago. At the age of 15, Farah attended art school in Iran where she first became acquainted with Western art. During this time, Farah also began learning traditional Persian miniature painting techniques. Hailing from an artistic family, Farah painted throughout her childhood. Her aunt, brother, and sister are all prominent artists. At university, Farah studied graphic design. Upon graduating, Farah decided to pursue painting professionally. Throughout Farah’s university days however, there were teetering tension in Iran.
  • Not too long after Farah graduated, Iran went through a revolution. It became very difficult to continue as an artist during this tumultuous period. The country became very ideological. Straight after the revolution, there was no support from the government, and many galleries and museums closed down. The Persian art scene suffered for 10 years, with little activity through that period. The art scene has been making a comeback over the past few years, however. Iran’s rich literary and cultural heritage has inspired Farah’s work. Specifically, Persian miniatures greatly inspired her work. The stories that are portrayed in the minarets portray love, violence, friendship, and family. Just as each minaret tells many stories, so does each of Farah’s works. In one work for example, both day and night are represented. In another work, both heaven and hell are portrayed on the same canvas. Farah brings it all together, “life is full of both,” she states. Farah likes to bring these miniatures into the modern day, and she enjoys mixing the traditional with the new. Iranian poems have also greatly inspired Farah’s work. She places great importance in these poems since they are timeless. Love, family, honor, as well as many other themes and issues of today’s world are timeless. The same issues portrayed in these hundreds of years old poems, are still significant in society today. Farah admires the timelessness of these poems, which demonstrate that human nature never changes.
  • Other professional activities: 2010 - Head of the jury of Visual art Festival ,Mellat Gallery Tehran Iran 2010 - Nominator of magic of persia 2009 - Jury And Member Of The Selection Committee Of The First International Fajr Festival Of Visual Arts - Tehran Museum Of Contemporary Art - Tehran, Iran 2008 - Nominator Of Magic Of Persia Contemporary Art Prize - London, England www.mopcap.com 2008 - Jury and Member of the selection committee of Iran Art Festival - Niavaran Cultural Center - Tehran, Iran
  • Farah Ossouli was born in 1953 in Zanjan. She studied graphic design at the University of Tehran and was a student of the well known miniature painter Mahmoud Farschian. She has always been interested in the works of Hafiz, and for the past four years she has been on a journey exploring the work of Hafiz.
  • Farah Ossouli was born in 1953 in Zanjan. She studied graphic design at the University of Tehran and was a student of the well known miniature painter Mahmoud Farschian. She has always been interested in the works of Hafiz, and for the past four years she has been on a journey exploring the work of Hafiz.
  • Other professional activities: 2010 - Head of the jury of Visual art Festival ,Mellat Gallery Tehran Iran 2010 - Nominator of magic of persia 2009 - Jury And Member Of The Selection Committee Of The First International Fajr Festival Of Visual Arts - Tehran Museum Of Contemporary Art - Tehran, Iran 2008 - Nominator Of Magic Of Persia Contemporary Art Prize - London, England www.mopcap.com 2008 - Jury and Member of the selection committee of Iran Art Festival - Niavaran Cultural Center - Tehran, Iran
  • Other professional activities: 2010 - Head of the jury of Visual art Festival ,Mellat Gallery Tehran Iran 2010 - Nominator of magic of persia 2009 - Jury And Member Of The Selection Committee Of The First International Fajr Festival Of Visual Arts - Tehran Museum Of Contemporary Art - Tehran, Iran 2008 - Nominator Of Magic Of Persia Contemporary Art Prize - London, England www.mopcap.com 2008 - Jury and Member of the selection committee of Iran Art Festival - Niavaran Cultural Center - Tehran, Iran
  • Being in Heaven ,Being in Hell. Triptych. 75x35 75x75 75x35. 2007. gouache on cardbord participated in christies auction Two lovers are seen in the middle panel in a Heavenly setting and just as the nature, are quenched by the spring of love. The pink sky, the blue river, and colors of landscape are reminiscent of traditional miniature paintings, denoting a sublime world. A man and a woman, burning in the fire of estrangement, envy, and sorrow, are seen in the paintings on either side. Each one of the happy couple is the deity of the other. If two people are happy, perhaps two others are sad because they have lost the very same status. If someone achieves love, a status, or a joy, it means that someone else has lost or failed to achieve that love, status, or joy. Geometric composition of this triptych puts major emphasis on the middle panel. Similar to other works of the painter, time and space are employed allegorically. Various symbols designate different meanings.
  • Participated in Christies auction. 75x 110. 2007. Gouache on Cardboard Venus, goddess of Love and Beauty, came into being from the foaming sea. Born out of chaos, Venus danced in the sea and upon reaching the seashore, saw plants grown under her feet. And she finally flew to the skies along with birds. Inspired by Angelo Poliziano, poet of the Renaissance period, who himself was inspired by Homer's poem about Venus, Sandro Botecelli painted the Birth of V enus in the style of antique sculptures in 1480. Venus, emerging from the sea, is standing in the center of the painting on an enormous seashell, covering her nude, supple and dream-like body with her long hair. Her shell is pushed to the shore by the west wind of Zephyr, who is embracing Chloris, amid a shower of rose-colored flowers. On the right, goddess of Law and Spring is approaching Venus with a purple cloak embroidered with red and white daisies - to cover her naked figure. The Birth of V enus expresses great hopes of the Renaissance period for the rebirth of humanity. Inspired by Botecelli's Birth of V enus and old Persian painting, Farah Ossouli depicts contemporary Venus. Venus in her painting, fully dressed and covering part of her body with a scarf, is standing on a shell. Astounded by the birth of Venus, Chloris and the west wind of Zephyr are standing by on the left and flowers are replaced by clouds. On the right, a man is spreading a blanket (patterned with stars) over Venus, thus symbolizing darkness, concealment, secret, infinity, and disguise. Geometric divisions of the painting illustrate primordial and perpetual sequence of day and night and continuity of life in various layers of time and space. Cypresses represent youthful pride; buds symbolize spring and rejuvenation. The moon is illuminating the sky and the river denotes the passing life. The sun is making appearance from behind the clouds and birds are on the wing in the upper part of the painting. According to mythology, Venus will eventually fly to the skies along with the birds.
  • Gouache on cardboard.110x75.2007 Participated in Sotheby s Auction Creation of Man From the collection "Commemoration" Homage to Michael Angelo This work is inspired by Michael Angelo's famous fresco work, Creation of Man. The goddess (Izad Banou) and small fairies, who have surrounded her in this painting, initiate human life on earth. From an Iranian traditional standpoint, women are symbol of life, abundance, fertility, and wisdom, for they always give birth to man. A majority of religions that have been practiced in Iran absorbed customs and concepts to compensate the great lack of essential mother figure – or a female element – in their sacred writings. Even Zoroaster took a compensatory measure with regard to the mix of angels. Cypress in this painting is a symbol of a proud future and everlasting youth of a man who is given a new life by a woman. Buds depict birth and his renewed conception. Similar to earth, woman is a symbol of blessings and acceptance. Whilst she gives life to man, she embraces him again when he is no longer alive. The painting refers to the age of goddesses and archetypes of the past. They still can be found all across the world giving birth to men. The clouds surrounding the goddess symbolize fertility. In its composition, the painting shows night time with stars and day time with the sun. There are also birds transmitting different messages. And creation still continues …
  • Participated in bonhams auction. 75X75. GOUCHE ON CARDBORD. 2008 This painting challenges the question of honeymoon at the start of a sweet life. Composition of the painting is inspired by traditional Persian painting as well as Iranian Kilim and Kaba. Divided forms of the pond and orchard within the plane of the painting indicates veiled geometry in Islamic art. Colors, position of figures, minute details, and motifs serve to depict a world full of kindness, joy, and hope. Two lovers cuddled at the center of the painting are in a green surrounding which connotes a garden. Their dreams, in the form of a nest, can be seen among the branches of a plane tree on top of the painting. Plane tree itself is a sacred and precious symbol in Iranian art. In the background, an open window looks at a starry night.. There is festivity and drinking, and unaware of the future, the two lovers are looking at the two birds. The two birds are encaged in a golden cage looking back at each other. Many stories have a happy ending when the two lovers marry each other. In real life, however, stories begin right from that moment. Which one will be the end of this sweet beginning? The nest or the cage!?
  • 110x75. 2007 .gouache on cardboard. Participated in Bonhams Auction Love and Death from" Shahnameh" Series From the collection "Destiny of Shahname Women" Beautiful, daring Princess Tahmine suddenly found out that luck had knocked on her door and her unseen lover had been sleeping in her house. She went to Rostam's bed in the dead of night, and they both lost the gamble of love overnight; a passionate love, a brief encounter, followed by continued departure. Blossoming bud is a symbol of the conception of Sohrab. Tahmine is lying in Rostam's arms yearning to have a child from him, without even knowing that the one who gives her the child will take it back. This refers to a termination of matriarchy in which a son is searching for his father, because neither knows the other. The son gets killed by his father in a tough battle. The work is divided into four sections, indicating four elements in nature. The images on the top and bottom of the painting depict the love between Tahmine and Rostam, and Sohrab lying in Rostam's arms, portrays a mirror-like reflection. Tahmine is in a situation similar to that of Sohrab. In effect, she was devastated the night when she lovingly went to him, for she lost the child that intercourse gave them. Satan and angel are watching the scene from either side of the painting, as if they are audience of a play. Bloody sword of Satan indicates that evil is triumphant and angel has sadly surrendered. Struggle between Ahoora Mazda and Satan, good and evil, and light and darkness, still continues. Whether goodness wins or loses, an evolution is the result of this struggle. The tree of wisdom will grow in the same soil that embraces Sohrab as a seed. Circumstances of a hero are often recounted in every struggle, but this painting describes untold sentiments of a heroine behind the scenes of a war.
  • Basin, early 14th century Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Farah Ossouli5

    1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1429162-farah-ossouli5/
    2. 2. Farah’s beautiful works are unbelievably detailed.Her brush strokes are so thin and delicate that it isimpossible not to stare at her work in awe. Herthemes of love, violence, and duality are issues thatmankind face today, just as they had in the times ofthe Persian miniatures. Farah’s work alludes to aperiod of cultural renaissance in Iran that remindsus of the country’s rich heritage. She is one of thefew Middle Eastern artists to have one of her piecesfeatured on the Met Museum’s websiteFarah Ossouli s-a născut în anul 1953 în Zanjan. Aurmat facultatea de Arte Plastice la Universitateadin Teheran unde i-a fost elevă cunoscutuluiminiaturist Mahmoud Farschian.
    3. 3. Cage Bird and Burning
    4. 4. And someone comes
    5. 5. Anticipation
    6. 6. Dream to Fly 2008
    7. 7. Family Paradise
    8. 8. Imagination
    9. 9. In mirror of love 2008
    10. 10. My bird, your cageKiss
    11. 11. MessageSelf Portrait from Burning wigs Series 2010.
    12. 12. Serenade
    13. 13. Rival
    14. 14. Life story
    15. 15. Bird and Cage
    16. 16. Passage Through History Gouache on cardboard 1983
    17. 17. International Modern andContemporary Art Auctionsgouache on cardboard 2007 2008 2009 London, Dubai
    18. 18. Being in Heaven ,Being in Hell
    19. 19. Birth of Venus
    20. 20. Creation of man. Michelangelo
    21. 21. Honeymoon
    22. 22. Love and Deathfrom Shahnameh Series
    23. 23. Iran Text & Pictures: Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasandaSound: Farid Farjad - Sari Galin; Dele Divaneh

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