Gondar, The Bath of King Fasilidas

498 views
380 views

Published on

YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE:
http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-2154872-ethiopia27/
Thank you!
Beyond the confines of the city to the north-west by the Qaha River there is another fine building sometimes associated by Fasilidas, a bathing palace. The building is a two-storeyed battlemented structure situated within and on one side of a rectangular pool of water which was supplied by a canal from the nearby river. The bathing pavilion itself stands on pier arches, and contains several rooms reached by a stone bridge, part of which could be raised for defense. The Emperor, who was greatly interested in architecture, was also responsible for seven churches and a number of bridges.

6 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Gracias Eduardo, mil gracias
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • @undefined
    Thank you Pilar Aluxia, thank you! It reminded me another roots. Please see also some pictures in:
    http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/ta-prohm-jungle-temple-1-7050634
    http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/ta-prohm-jungle-temple-2
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Muy bueno, Michaela. ¡Que extraños efectos hace las raíces de los árboles! Un abrazo.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Thank you Carmen and John; I remember Ta Phrom in Siem Reap, it was first time I have seen such roots eating walls!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • How interesting,thank you Michaela.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
498
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
36
Comments
6
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Gondar, The Bath of King Fasilidas

  1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-2154872-ethiopia27/
  2. 2. Gondar is a town founded in 1636 by the great Emperor Fasilidas, serving as the royal capital of Ethiopia for over 230 years. Fasil Ghebbi are the remains of a fortress-city that was the residence of the Ethiopian emperor Fasilidas and his successors. Around 2km northwest of Fasil Ghebbi lies Fasilidas’ Bath, which has been attributed to both Fasilidas and Iyasu I. Today it is used as a baptismal during Timkat, the most magnificent religious celebration in Ethiopia. Timkat is celebrated in the commemoration of the baptism of Jesus Christ in Jordan River. It is renowned every year on January 19 or 20 on leap year.
  3. 3. Beyond the confines of the city to the north-west by the Qaha River there is another fine building sometimes associated by Fasilidas, a bathing palace. The building is a two-storeyed battlemented structure situated within and on one side of a rectangular pool of water which was supplied by a canal from the nearby
  4. 4. The bathing pavilion itself stands on pier arches, and contains several rooms reached by a stone bridge, part of which could be raised for defense. The Emperor, who was greatly interested in architecture was also responsible for seven churches and a number of
  5. 5. The large, rectangular sunken pool, which is reputedly larger than an Olympic pool, is overlooked by a small but charming building, thought by some to be Fasilidas’ second residence.
  6. 6. It’s a beautiful and peaceful spot, where snakelike tree roots envelop, support and digest sections of the stone walls.
  7. 7. Although the complex was used for bathing (royalty used to don inflated goatskin lifejackets for their refreshing dips!), it was likely to have been constructed for religious celebrations, the likes of which still go on today.
  8. 8. Once a year, Fasilidas’ Bath is filled with water (the water comes from a river and it takes up to a month to fill) for the Timkat celebration.
  9. 9. After being blessed by a priest, the pool becomes a riot of splashing water, shouts and laughter as a crowd of hundreds jumps in. The ceremony replicates Christ’s baptism in the Jordan River, and is seen as an important renewal of faith.
  10. 10. During Timakt the Tabot (the replica of Ark of the Covenant), which is present on every Ethiopian altar (somewhat like the Western altar stone), is reverently wrapped in rich cloth and born in procession on the head of the priest. The Tabot, which is otherwise rarely seen by the laity, represents the manifestation of Jesus as the Messiah when he came to the Jordan for baptism. The clergy, bearing robes and umbrellas of many hues, perform rollicking dances and songs.
  11. 11. Greater Blue-eared Starling
  12. 12. Sound: Aster Aweke - Fiker Text: Internet Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu Sanda Negruţiu Jean Moldovan Alin Samochis Daniel Scrãdeanu Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi oreanuş www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda

×