Esfahan Ali Qapu palace3
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Esfahan Ali Qapu palace3

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE (You have a link on the first slide): http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1360143-esfahan-ali-qapu3/ ...

YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE (You have a link on the first slide): http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1360143-esfahan-ali-qapu3/

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Ālī Qāpū (Turko-Persian word for Imperial Gate) is a grand palace in Isfahan, located on the western side of the Naqsh-e Jahan Square and was originally designed as a vast portal. It is forty-eight meters high and there are seven floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral staircase. In the sixth floor music room, deep circular niches are found in the walls, having not only aesthetic value, but also acoustic.

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  • Thank you. I also love him!
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  • Very impressive including the park around the palace.....Thank you Michaela
    and thank you also for Farid Farjad.
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  • Ali Qapu is a Safavid palace in Isfahan, Iran which was originally designed as a vast portal in the early 17th century and then it turned to a six-story palace with a series of additional architectural elements over a sixty year period to accommodate court functions. Building materials used for the structure of the Ali Qapu are mud and baked brick based on the foundation of the quarried stones. Vaulted ceilings of mud brick are richly decorated with painted, carved stucco and cutout Muqarnas in the sixth floor ‘music room’. As it can be seen cutouts on the surfaces of the Muqarnas in the shapes of ceramics and glassware have created delicate and fine surfaces which can also meet the acoustical characteristics of a complex and unique Helmholtz cavity absorber due to their various forms and disparate air volumes behind them.
  • The lower floors are uninteresting and were clearly used as quarters for guards, and the security of the upper apartments was further enhanced by the uncomfortably steep and narrow stairways which lead up and down within the building. The interior of the building is compulsively decorated with naturalistic scenes , charmingly painted birds and some figures , many of which have sadly been defaced or damaged over time. These are now being repaired. The famous " Musicians Room " contains elaborate cut-out plaster work depicting all manner and shapes of vases, although it is doubtful whether any could ever actually have been stored there.  
  • Ālī Qāpū ( Turko-Persian word for Imperial Gate ) is a grand palace in Isfahan , located on the western side of the Naqsh-e Jahan Square .and was originally designed as a vast portal. It is forty-eight meters high and there are seven floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral staircase. In the sixth floor music room, deep circular niches are found in the walls, having not only aesthetic value, but also acoustic. The name Ālī Qāpū, from Arabic Ālī, "Imperial or Great", and Turkic Qāpū meaning "gate", was given to this place as it was right at the entrance to the Safavid palaces which stretched from the Maidan Naqsh-i-Jahan to the Chahār Bā gh Boulevard . The building, another wonderful Safavid edifice, was built by decree of Shah Abbas the Great in the early seventeenth century. It was here that the great monarch used to entertain noble visitors, and foreign ambassadors. Shah Abbas, here for the first time celebrated the Nowruz (New Year's Day) of 1006 AH / 1597 C.E.
  • The columns, like those of Chehel Sotoon , were originally encased in mirrored glass to give the impression of a roof floating in the air, and like them are cut from single chenar trees ( Platanus orientalis ).
  • The Ali Qapu is a Safavid palace in Isfahan, Iran which was originally designed as a vast portal in the early 17th century and then it turned to a six-story palace with a series of additional architectural elements over a sixty year period to accommodate court functions. Building materials used for the structure of the Ali Qapu are mud and baked brick based on the foundation of the quarried stones. Vaulted ceilings of mud brick are richly decorated with painted, carved stucco and cutout Muqarnas in the sixth floor ‘music room’. As it can be seen cutouts on the surfaces of the Muqarnas in the shapes of ceramics and glassware have created delicate and fine surfaces which can also meet the acoustical characteristics of a complex and unique Helmholtz cavity absorber due to their various forms and disparate air volumes behind them.
  • Ālī Qāpū ( Turko-Persian word for Imperial Gate ) is a grand palace in Isfahan , located on the western side of the Naqsh-e Jahan Square .and was originally designed as a vast portal. It is forty-eight meters high and there are seven floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral staircase. In the sixth floor music room, deep circular niches are found in the walls, having not only aesthetic value, but also acoustic. The name Ālī Qāpū, from Arabic Ālī, "Imperial or Great", and Turkic Qāpū meaning "gate", was given to this place as it was right at the entrance to the Safavid palaces which stretched from the Maidan Naqsh-i-Jahan to the Chahār Bā gh Boulevard . The building, another wonderful Safavid edifice, was built by decree of Shah Abbas the Great in the early seventeenth century. It was here that the great monarch used to entertain noble visitors, and foreign ambassadors. Shah Abbas, here for the first time celebrated the Nowruz (New Year's Day) of 1006 AH / 1597 C.E.
  • Interior architecture. Ālī Qāpū is rich in naturalistic wall paintings by Reza Abbassi, the court painter of Shah Abbas I, and his pupils. There are floral, animal, and bird motifs. The highly ornamented doors and windows of the palace have almost all been pillaged at times of social anarchy. Only one window on the third floor has escaped the ravages of time. Ālī Qāpū was repaired and restored substantially during the reign of Shah Sultan Hussein, the last Safavid ruler, but fell into a dreadful state of dilapidation again during the short reign of invading Afghans. under the Qajar Nasir al-Din shah's reign (1848–96), the Safavid cornices and floral tiles above the portal were replaced by tiles bearing inscriptions. Shah Abbas II was enthusiastic about the embellishment and perfection of Ālī Qāpū. His chief contribution was given to the magnificent hall, the constructures on the third floor. The 18 columns of the hall are covered with mirrors and its ceiling is decorated with great paintings. The chancellery was stationed on the first floor.
  • On the sixth, the royal reception and banquets were held. The largest rooms are found on this floor. The stucco decoration of the banquet hall abounds in motif of various vessels and cups. The sixth floor was popularly called (the music room). Here various ensembles performed music and sang songs. From the upper galleries, the Safavid ruler watched polo, maneuvers and the horse-racing opposite the square of Naqsh-i-Jahan. The palace is depicted on the reverse of the Iranian 20,000 rials banknote.
  • Cause of Denomination The Ālī Qāpū has multiple connotations, but generally connotes entrance or supreme gate to the complex of palaces and public buildings of the Safavid Government. Construction stages The Ālī Qāpū building was founded in several stages, beginning from a building with a single gate, with entrance to the government building complex, and gradually developed, ending in the existing shape. The period of the development, with intervals lasted approximately seventy years. First Stage  : The initial building acting as entrance to the complex was in cubical shape and in two stories, with dimensions measuring 20 x 19 meter and 13 meter high. Second Stage  : Foundation of the upper hall, built on the entrance vestibule, with cubical shape, over the initial cubic shape structure with the same height in two visible stories. Third Stage  : Foundation of the fifth story, the music amphitheater or music hall, built on the lower hall, using the central room for sky light, and thus the vertical extension being emphasized.
  • Fourth Stage  : Foundation of the eastern verandah or pavilion advancing towards the square, supported by the tower shaped building. By foundation of this verandah, the entrance vestibule was extended along the main gate and passage to the market, perpendicular to the eastern flank of the building. Fifth Stage  : Foundation of the wooden ceiling of the verandah, supported by 18 wooden columns, and contemporaneous with erection of the ceiling, an additional stairway of the southern flank was founded and was called the Kingly Stairway. Sixth Stage  : During this stage a water tower was built in the northern flank for provision of water for the copper pool of the columned verandah. Plaster decorations in reception story and music hall.
  • The room on the sixth floor is also decorated with plasterwork, representing pots and vessels and one is famous as the music and sound room. It is certainly well worth visiting for the cut out decorations round the room, which represent a considerable artistic feat. These cut out shapes were not placed there to act as cupboards: the stuccowork is most delicate and falls to pieces at the highest touch. So we conclude that it was placed in position in these rooms for ornament and decoration. The rooms were used for private parties and for the King's musicians, and these hollow places in the walls retained the echoes and produced the sounds of the singing and musical instruments clearly in all parts. Decorations The decoration of the large room on the third floor which opens out on the large pillared hall, and which was used by Shah Abbas for entertaining his official guests is the most interesting. Fortunately the ceilings, on which birds are depicted in their natural colors, have remained without interference in their original state from Safavid times, and these are the best roofs in the building.
  • The royal palace of 'Ali Qapu dominates the south eastern side of the central square in Isfahan, formerly called the Meidan-e-Shah . Its name means "The High Gate" and its impressive entranceway was no doubt intended to symbolize the strength and authority of the Safavid monarchs who ruled the country, and, as the posters on the verandah show, this significance is retained even in present times when the square has been renamed Meidan-e-Imam. The talar or verandah formed an ideal place from which to watch the games of polo which took place in the square and is richly decorated with designs painted on the external plaster at the rear and elaborate tracery in the ceiling. The columns, like those of Chehel Sotoon , were originally encased in mirrored glass to give the impression of a roof floating in the air, and like them are cut from single chenar trees ( Platanus orientalis ). The lower floors are uninteresting and were clearly used as quarters for guards, and the security of the upper apartments was further enhanced by the uncomfortably steep and narrow stairways which lead up and down within the building. The interior of the building is compulsively decorated with naturalistic scenes , charmingly painted birds and some figures , many of which have sadly been defaced or damaged over time. These are now being repaired. The famous " Musicians Room " contains elaborate cut-out plaster work depicting all manner and shapes of vases, although it is doubtful whether any could ever actually have been stored there.

Esfahan Ali Qapu palace3 Esfahan Ali Qapu palace3 Presentation Transcript

  • 3http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1360143-esfahan-ali-qapu3/
  • The Naghsh-e Jahan Square in Isfahan is one of the largest city squares in the world and an outstandingexample of Iranian and Islamic architecture. It has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.Piaţa regală a fost construită de Şahul Abbas cel Mare (1587-1629) care în anul 1598 hotărăşte construireanoii sala capitale, cea mai impozantă capitală a lumii islamice, supranumită „perla orientului” sau „jumătatede lume”
  • Piaţa regală Naghsh-e Jahan face parte din Patrimoniul Mondial UNESCO
  • Ālī Qāpū (Turko-Persian word for ImperialGate) is a grand palace in Isfahan, located onthe western side of the Naqsh-e Jahan Squarewhich was originally designed as a vast portalin the early 17th century and then it turned to asix-story palace with a series of additionalarchitectural elements over a sixty year periodto accommodate court functionsAli Qapu (în persană şi turcă însemnând PoartaImperială) este un palat important din Isfahansituat pe latura de vest a pieţei regale Naqsh-eJahan. Destinat iniţial să fie poartă de intrare aajuns un impozant palat cu o înălţime de 48 demetri (şapte nivele).În 1993, municipalitatea ieşeană a semnat unprotocol de înfrăţire cu oraşul iranian Esfahan.
  • The large room on the third floor opens out on thelarge pillared hall, and which was used by Shah Abbasfor entertaining his official guests. The columns, likethose of Chehel Sotoon, were originally encased inmirrored glass to give the impression of a roof floatingin the air, and like them are cut from single chenartrees (Platanus orientalis).
  • The talar or verandah formed an ideal place from which towatch the games of polo which took place in the square andis richly decorated with designs painted on the externalplaster at the rear and elaborate tracery in the ceiling.
  • Iran Text and images slide 4: Internet Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu Nicoleta Leu Copyright: All the images belong to their authorsSound: Farid Farjad – Isfahan Arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda