http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1638768-el-jarabe-tapatio/
Like all folk dancing,traditional Mexican dancesprovide a glimpse into theculture of the region. Notonly do these dances f...
Mexican culture shinesthrough the traditionaldances of the country.Many Mexican familiesare planted firmly inreligious fai...
Many school children learn the JarabeTapatío (Mexican Hat Dance) in theirclassrooms, while tourists to Mexico maywitness a...
The Jarabe TapatíoThe Mexican Hat Dance wasnamed the national dance ofMexico in 1924 in an effort to bringtogether several...
The dance involves a male and a female dancer, withthe male working hard to seduce the female during thedance. At first th...
A joyous dance, thenumber finishes with thewoman accepting the maledancers courtship, and thetwo delight the audiencewith ...
Many variations show different levels of sexuality;traditional Mexican culture would have prohibited verysuggestive behavi...
The accompanying music is Mexican folk that was created in the 19thcentury. Today, Mexicans still proudly and joyously per...
Jarabe Tapatío, or the Mexican hat dance, is the bestknown of a variety of Mexican folk dance called thejarabe. Originally...
Charro and China Poblana garments
China poblana (or, ChinesePueblan) is a term that refers totwo elements of the culture ofMexico that have been relatedby n...
The china poblana of popular                                      imagination    —     of    shiny                        ...
The China Poblana gown, wore by women that worked in the cities as maids or vendorscreated this new clothing style that co...
Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla
The legend of this emblematic woman was born betweenthe XVI and XVII in Puebla, in New Spain. Mirrha was achild from Mongo...
Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla
Miguel de Sosa taught Mirrha to read, to pray and to behave like an Europeanlady. She became a Catholic, changed her name ...
Festival costume skirtBritish Museum                         When Miguel de Sosa died, he                         provided...
As a member of the Poor Clares of Saint Augustine Catarina studiedphilosophy, theology and law; she made her main priority...
Today she’s remembered not only for her dress, that became part of theidentity of Puebla, but also because of her life dev...
Her legend was born with that dress, the colorful, bright and highlyornamented dress that has been a symbol of Mexico all ...
Mexican hat dance, or Jarabe Tapatío (Feria de las Culturas Amigas de la Ciudad de México)
The Charro gown; once theSpanish left the new upperclasses enjoyed horse riding anddeveloped a suitable gown calledtraje d...
Charro is a term referring to a traditional horseman from Mexico, originating in the central-western regions primarily in ...
The "charro film" was a genre ofthe Golden Age of Mexicancinema between 1935 and 1959,and probably played a large rolein p...
Stained glass window entitled "El Jarabe Tapatio" (The Jarabe Dance from Guadalajara) designed by Roberto Montenegro andXa...
“Bailarines de Vallarta” (“Vallarta Dancers”) by JimDemetro, 2006Inspired after seeing Vallarta’s famous Xiutla dance trou...
As the oldest and most celebrated dance company in Mexico, BalletFolklórico de México de Amalia Hernández shares the beaut...
Text and pictures: Internet                                                                                Copyright: All ...
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
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México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
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México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
México, El jarabe tapatio
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México, El jarabe tapatio

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE (You have a link on the first slide): http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1638768-el-jarabe-tapatio/

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The Mexican Hat Dance was named the national dance of Mexico in 1924 in an effort to bring together several different cultures together as one national identity. Since it became the national dance it has also become a symbol of Mexico around the world.
The dance involves a male and a female dancer, with the male working hard to seduce the female during the dance. At first the two dancers flirt, but then the woman's attention is turned away from the man's advances. A joyous dance, the number finishes with the woman accepting the male dancer's courtship, and the two delight the audience with a kiss hidden by the male dancer's hat. Many variations show different levels of sexuality; traditional Mexican culture would have prohibited very suggestive behavior in a public performance, but culture has changed and with it this dance has become increasingly suggestive.
The accompanying music is Mexican folk that was created in the 19th century. Today, Mexicans still proudly and joyously perform the Jarabe Tapatío at various fiestas and other big events.
Famous ballerina Anna Pavlova went on to perform a version of this dance en pointe, and it brought her newfound celebrity in Mexico.

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México, El jarabe tapatio

  1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1638768-el-jarabe-tapatio/
  2. 2. Like all folk dancing,traditional Mexican dancesprovide a glimpse into theculture of the region. Notonly do these dances fromMexico express therhythms of the music, butalso the vital colors woveninto Mexican clothing anddecoration, as well asthemes important to theregion such as Catholicismand communion withnature.
  3. 3. Mexican culture shinesthrough the traditionaldances of the country.Many Mexican familiesare planted firmly inreligious faith and therich intricacies ofgenerational traditionsand celebrationsobserved year afteryear. Dance has longplayed a role in thesespecial days, such ascoming-of-age parties,religious events, andagricultural celebrations.
  4. 4. Many school children learn the JarabeTapatío (Mexican Hat Dance) in theirclassrooms, while tourists to Mexico maywitness a performance of Danza del Venado(Dance of the Deer) or Tlacolorerosis (anagricultural dance). While these traditionaldances each have very different roots andstyles, they bring various aspects of Mexicanculture to the audiences who see them
  5. 5. The Jarabe TapatíoThe Mexican Hat Dance wasnamed the national dance ofMexico in 1924 in an effort to bringtogether several different culturestogether as one national identity.Since it became the nationaldance it has also become asymbol of Mexico around theworld, especially in the United
  6. 6. The dance involves a male and a female dancer, withthe male working hard to seduce the female during thedance. At first the two dancers flirt, but then the womansattention is turned away from the mans advances.
  7. 7. A joyous dance, thenumber finishes with thewoman accepting the maledancers courtship, and thetwo delight the audiencewith a kiss hidden by themale dancers hat.
  8. 8. Many variations show different levels of sexuality;traditional Mexican culture would have prohibited verysuggestive behavior in a public performance, but culturehas changed and with it this dance has becomeincreasingly suggestive.
  9. 9. The accompanying music is Mexican folk that was created in the 19thcentury. Today, Mexicans still proudly and joyously perform the JarabeTapatío at various fiestas and other big events.
  10. 10. Jarabe Tapatío, or the Mexican hat dance, is the bestknown of a variety of Mexican folk dance called thejarabe. Originally banned by colonial authorities in the19th century due to its sexual nature and generalchallenge to Spanish rule, it has since becomesymbolic of Mexico both in the country and abroad.As such the dress worn by participants is also meantto symbolize Mexican women and men, with womendressed in a style called “China Poblana” and mendressed as charros.
  11. 11. Charro and China Poblana garments
  12. 12. China poblana (or, ChinesePueblan) is a term that refers totwo elements of the culture ofMexico that have been relatedby name since the end of the19th century, although theelements they incorporate aremuch older. In its mostcommonly and widely usedsense today, it is the name ofwhat is considered thetraditional style of dress ofwomen in the MexicanRepublic, although in reality itonly belonged to some urbanzones in the middle andsoutheast of the country, beforeits disappearance in the secondhalf of the 19th century.
  13. 13. The china poblana of popular imagination — of shiny embroidered blouse and shawl — is a product of the nineteenth century. Symbol of Mexican femininity, she is linked to Spanish prototypes such as the maja, immortalized in paintingsFountain of China Poblana in Puebla by Murillo y Goya
  14. 14. The China Poblana gown, wore by women that worked in the cities as maids or vendorscreated this new clothing style that combines Indian, Spanish and oriental elements.
  15. 15. Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla
  16. 16. The legend of this emblematic woman was born betweenthe XVI and XVII in Puebla, in New Spain. Mirrha was achild from Mongolia, formerly in China, who was she wassold to a merchant who then took her to New Spain to bethe Viceroy’s personal servant. But as soon as theyarrived to Acapulco, a wealthy man from Puebla, calledMiguel de Sosa, offered a big amount of money for her,almost ten times more than the Viceroy, so the merchantsold her to him instead.
  17. 17. Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla
  18. 18. Miguel de Sosa taught Mirrha to read, to pray and to behave like an Europeanlady. She became a Catholic, changed her name to Catarina de San Juan andcreated a mix of her typical dressing and the skirts she saw on the indigenouswomen. This dress became famous and soon everybody in Puebla have heardabout the young woman who came from China and wore the most beautifuldresses, she came to be known as La China Poblana (Poblano/a is the nameof the people from Puebla, Chino/a of the people from China).
  19. 19. Festival costume skirtBritish Museum When Miguel de Sosa died, he provided Catarina’s manumission in his will, and she decided to enter a convent.
  20. 20. As a member of the Poor Clares of Saint Augustine Catarina studiedphilosophy, theology and law; she made her main priority con coexist andconvert indigenous people by teaching them catechism, a work sherealized until she died in 1688.
  21. 21. Today she’s remembered not only for her dress, that became part of theidentity of Puebla, but also because of her life devoted to helping, educatingand teaching others. She is also a symbol of unity, of Puebla’s community. It’samazing that 322 years after she died, this woman is still recognized andremembered for all the good work and love she gave to this city. Her tomb is inLa Compañía de Jesus Temple, and is still one of the most visited in Puebla.
  22. 22. Her legend was born with that dress, the colorful, bright and highlyornamented dress that has been a symbol of Mexico all over the world.But her story was real and is still an inspirational one. And walkingaround Puebla you’ll find many reminders of this woman, the ChinaPoblana Fountain is a classic landmark of the city. The Casona de laChina Poblana is a hotel in what used to be her house before sheentered the convent. The Museo Regional de Antropologia e Historiahas some examples of the China Poblana dress, as well as its story. So,as you can see, this woman’s story is unequivocally liked to Puebla’sstory, so come and get immerse in this amazing tale of love, faith anddestiny.
  23. 23. Mexican hat dance, or Jarabe Tapatío (Feria de las Culturas Amigas de la Ciudad de México)
  24. 24. The Charro gown; once theSpanish left the new upperclasses enjoyed horse riding anddeveloped a suitable gown calledtraje de charro. A charro soonbecame a man that was a skilledhorse rider.
  25. 25. Charro is a term referring to a traditional horseman from Mexico, originating in the central-western regions primarily in thestate of Jalisco including:Michoacán, Zacatecas, Durango, Guanajuato, Morelos and Puebla. The terms Vaquero andRanchero (Cowboy and Rancher) are similar to the Charro but different in culture, etiquette, mannerism, clothing, tradition andsocial status.The traditional Mexican charro is known for colorful clothing and participating in coleadero y charreada, a specific type ofMexican rodeo. The charreada is the national sport in Mexico, and is regulated by the Federación Mexicana de Charrería.
  26. 26. The "charro film" was a genre ofthe Golden Age of Mexicancinema between 1935 and 1959,and probably played a large rolein popularizing the charro, akinto what occurred with the adventof the Hollywood Western. Themost notable charro stars wereJosé Alfredo Jiménez, PedroInfante, Jorge Negrete, AntonioAguilar, Vicente Fernández.In both Mexican and US statessuch as California, Texas,Illinois, Zacatecas, Michoacán,Jalisco, charros participate intournaments to show off theirskill either in team competitioncharreada, or in individualcompetition such as elcoleadero. These events arepracticed in a Lienzo charro. Thelienzo charro can also become acircle used for bull riding.
  27. 27. Stained glass window entitled "El Jarabe Tapatio" (The Jarabe Dance from Guadalajara) designed by Roberto Montenegro andXavier Guerrero in the 1920s at the Museo de la Luz in the historic center of Mexico City
  28. 28. “Bailarines de Vallarta” (“Vallarta Dancers”) by JimDemetro, 2006Inspired after seeing Vallarta’s famous Xiutla dance troupeperforming the Jarabe Tapatío (Mexican Hat Dance), JimDemetro decided to honor this national dance of Mexico with asculpture. The life-sized figures are unique among Vallarta’ssculptures for their colored patinas. Under “Vallarta Dancers,”there is a plaque with the following message from Demetro:“The inspiration for the sculpture is the youthful energy, flowingmovement, and colorful costumes of the talented Xiutladancers and their instructor and choreographer Prof. EnriqueBarrios Limón.”
  29. 29. As the oldest and most celebrated dance company in Mexico, BalletFolklórico de México de Amalia Hernández shares the beauty of theuniverse in motion through Mexican dances from the pre-Colombian era,the Hispanic Viceroy period and the popular period of the Revolutionaryyears. In 1952, dancer and choreographer Amalia Hernández foundedthe Ballet Folklórico de México, having embarked at a very early age ona never-ending quest to rescue the dancing traditions of Mexico.
  30. 30. Text and pictures: Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasandaSound: El Jarabe Tapatio - Mariachi Nuevo Jalisco; Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlan
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