Colors of the Universe2

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE (You have a link on the first slide): http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1508522-colors-universe2/

Thank you!
Special Exhibitions at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Colors of the Universe: Chinese Hardstone Carving
Stone carving is one of the oldest arts in China, its beginnings dating back to remote antiquity. Although jade, the mineral nephrite, was held in the highest esteem, all stones that could achieve a luster after polishing, be it agate, turquoise, malachite, chalcedony, quartz, jasper, or lapis lazuli, were also appreciated. Stone carving experienced an efflorescence during the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), when an abundant supply of raw materials, exceptionally accomplished craftsmen, and, in particular, keen imperial patronage contributed to the creation of numerous superb works.

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  • Thank you Mirka for your interest and support, thank you
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  • Dirce is a Greek name for girls meaning Fruit of the pine. Thank you Dirce for adding 'Colors of the Universe' to your favorites. THANKS
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  • I am so GLAD you like! THANK YOU Karin, Ren, Mireille, Saly, George (I love your comment in all shows of SlideShare!) and John. Thank you for your support, I am truly honored, THANKS
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  • Beautiful work of art,so small yet so attractive.......Thanks Michaela.
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  • Thank you for bringing me this exhibition. It was just delightful.
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  • Panda by Wu Zuoren…detail
  • Colors of the Universe2

    1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1508522-colors-universe2/
    2. 2. 2
    3. 3. Flower Holder with Floral DesignQing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th century ChinaCarnelian and white agate H 11.4cm
    4. 4. Horse Carrying Books.Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century ChinaJade (nephrite) H. (11.6 cm)
    5. 5. Jar with Melons and ButterflyQing dynasty (1644–1911) 17th century ChinaAmethyst H. (7cm)
    6. 6. Ornament in the Shape of an Archaic Jade DiskQing dynasty (1644–1911), 18th centuryJade with enamel stand H 9.5cm
    7. 7. Ornament with Landscape and FiguresQing dynasty (1644–1911) ChinaAmber H. (10.2cm)
    8. 8. Peanuts and Jujube DatesQing dynasty (1644–1911)18th century ChinaChalcedony H. (2.9 cm)
    9. 9. Flower Holder with PomegranateQing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th century ChinaRose quartz H 11.7cm
    10. 10. As the Chinese character for “seed,” zi, is the same as that for “son,”the pomegranate with its many seeds is symbolic of having multiplesons to continue a family’s lineage.PomegranatesQing dynasty (1644–1911)18th century ChinaAgate H. (11.4 cm)
    11. 11. The use of puns and rebuses to express wishes forlongevity, good fortune, and even academic success iscommon in Chinese art. Pomegranates Qing dynasty (1644–1911)18th century China Agate H. (11.4 cm)
    12. 12. Vase with coverQing dynasty (1644–1911), Kangxi period (1662–1722)ChinaJade, Nephrite, white with light greenish tint and mottling of whiteand light brown
    13. 13. Arhat (Luohan)Liao dynasty (907–1125) ca. 1000 ChinaGlazed stoneware H. (104.8 cm)
    14. 14. Seated BuddhaQing dynasty (1644–1911)18th–19th century ChinaSmoky quartz H (8.6 cm)
    15. 15. Seated Luohan (Arhat) in a Grotto.Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century ChinaMalachite H. (22.9 cm)
    16. 16. Seated Luohan (Arhat) in a Grotto.Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century ChinaLapis lazuli H. (18.1 cm)
    17. 17. Seated Luohan (Arhat) in a Grotto.Ming dynasty (1368–1644) 15th century ChinaWood with pigment H. (114 cm)
    18. 18. Table Screen with Landscape SceneQing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century ChinaJade (jadeite) H 17.3cm
    19. 19. Three GoatsQing dynasty (1644–1911)19th century ChinaRock crystal H 9.8cm
    20. 20. vase18th century ChinaCarnelian and white agate H 10.2cm
    21. 21. Vase 18th century ChinaCarnelian and white agate H. (16.5 cm)
    22. 22. Vase 18th century ChinaLapis lazuli H. (14.6 cm)
    23. 23. Vase in the Shape of a BirdQing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century ChinaJade (nephrite)H. (13.5 cm)
    24. 24. vase 18th century ChinaCarnelian and white agate H 7.9cm
    25. 25. Vase with Bamboo and Plum TreeQing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th century China Chalcedony H14.6cm
    26. 26. Vase with Bird and FlowersQing dynasty (1644–1911) ChinaAmethyst H. (15.2cm)
    27. 27. Vase with Bird and FlowersQing dynasty (1644–1911) ChinaAmethyst H. (15.2cm)
    28. 28. Vase with Bird and FlowersQing dynasty (1644–1911) ChinaAmethyst H. (15.2cm)
    29. 29. Stone carving is one of the oldest arts in China, its beginnings dating back to remote antiquity. Althoughjade, the mineral nephrite, was held in the highest esteem, all stones that could achieve a luster afterpolishing, be it agate, turquoise, malachite, chalcedony, quartz, jasper, or lapis lazuli, were alsoappreciated. Stone carving experienced an efflorescence during the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), when anabundant supply of raw materials, exceptionally accomplished craftsmen, and, in particular, keen imperialpatronage contributed to the creation of numerous superb works.The stone carvings of the Qing period can be grouped in three categories: personal adornments such asrings, bracelets, and pendants; articles for daily use (mainly in the scholars studio) such as brushholders, water pots, and seals; and display pieces such as copies of antiques, miniature mountains, andanimal and human figures, the latter being the largest of the group. The carvings can also be classifiedby their decorative style: archaic or classical, meaning their shapes were derived from ancient ritualvessels; "Western," which bore the influence of contemporary Mughal art from northern India; and new ormodern, meaning novel shapes and designs created during the Qing dynasty.A common decorative theme, especially among works of the new style, was the use of rebuses, whichare symbols associated with auspicious meanings, to convey wishes for prosperity, longevity, goodfortune, perpetuation of a family line, or academic success. The tradition began early but remainedlargely in the popular culture until the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when significant socialchanges and increased imperial patronage helped elevate the rebus to the high art of the court.
    30. 30. Text and pictures: Metropolitan Museum Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasandaSound: Peter Kater and Nawang Khechog - The Dance of Innocents

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