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Coimbra2
 

Coimbra2

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE: ...

YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE:
http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1961883-coimbra2/

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This city holds a special place in the hearts of all the Portuguese. Rich in its history and said to be the oldest seat of learning in Portugal with a University founded on the 13th of August in 1290 by King Dinis. This makes it one of the oldest in the world. Six of Portugal’s Kings were born here and in 1139 until 1256 it was the chosen capital of the country. The original name in the Roman period was Aeminium, and it later developed under the influence of the greater nearby town of Conimbriga. This latter place is now a large archaeological site of great interest with a museum to display the findings from the diggings. At first sight the town appears more devoted to commerce than learning but the skyline above the lower part of the city suggests its real purpose.

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  • The Fado of Coimbra bears a close instrumental resemblance to the Fado that is sung in Lisbon. Its lyrics, however, have become more erudite and it displays a different spatial quality, with a different kind of vocal effect. The Fado of Coimbra was developed by university students, bringing with them their guitars and a different way of singing.They found Fado the ideal vehicle for preserving the memories of student life, singing about unrequited love and nights spent without sleep, or serenading their sweethearts from under the window. In fact, it is only the males in the student population who sing Fado, dressed in their traditional academic costume of black suits and thick gowns.The best time for listening to them is during the Queima das Fitas, the traditional festival held in May to mark the end of the academic year. The Noite da Serenata, when serenades are sung outside the entrance to the city’s old cathedral, is also a moment of great local emotion. <br />
  • Coimbra fado is different from Lisboa fado. Illustrating the traditional university student fado, Samaritana tells the legend of the water girl that one day made Christ blush, by the fountain (Jacob&apos;s well). Lyrics:Dos amores do RedentorNão reza a história sagrada,Mas diz uma lenda encantadaQue o bom Jesus sofreu de amor.Sofreu consigo e calouSua paixão divinal,Que assim, como qualquer mortal,Um dia de amor palpitou. <br />

Coimbra2 Coimbra2 Presentation Transcript

  • http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1961883-coimbra2/
  • Coimbra - Rua Viconde da Luz This city holds a special place in the hearts of all the Portuguese. Rich in its history and said to be the oldest seat of learning in Portugal with a University founded on the 13th of August in 1290 by King Dinis. This makes it one of the oldest in the world. Six of Portugal’s Kings were born here and in 1139 until 1256 it was the chosen capital of the country. The original name in the Roman period was Aeminium, and it later developed under the influence of the greater nearby town of Conimbriga. This latter place is now a large archaeological site of great interest with a museum to display the findings from the diggings. At first sight the town appears more devoted to commerce than learning but the skyline above the lower part of the city suggest its
  • As the first capital of Portugal and established the oldest Portuguese university, Coimbra has been for centuries a major musical center. Historically, the New Cathedral, the Monastery of Santa Cruz (founded by D. Afonso Henriques) and the University (with the music class since 1323) were the main centers of production and musical practice Homenagem à canção de Coimbra Celestino Alves André
  • The Old Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Velha de Coimbra) is one of the most important Romanesque Roman Catholic buildings in Portugal. Construction of the Sé Velha began some time after the Battle of Ourique (1139), when Count Afonso Henriques declared himself King of Portugal and chose Coimbra as capital. The first Count of Coimbra, the Mozarab Sisnando Davides, is buried in the cathedral.
  • The Old Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Velha)
  • The Old Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Velha), the cloister Afonso I (1109 – 1185), more commonly known as Afonso Henriques nicknamed "the Conqueror"
  • The Old Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Velha), the cloister
  • The most remarkable aspect of the Romanesque decoration of the Old Coimbra Cathedral is the large number of sculptured capitals (around 380), which turns it into one of the most important ensembles of Romanesque sculpture in Portugal. The absence of sculptured human figures may be because many of the artists that worked in the Cathedral were mozarabic, i.e. Christians who lived in Arab territories and that had settled in Coimbra in the 12th century. These artists were perhaps not used to human representations, which are forbidden in Islam The Old Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Velha), the cloister
  • (Sé Velha), the cloister
  • The Old Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Velha), the cloister
  • The Old Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Velha), the cloister
  • The Old Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Velha), ajulezos Estação (Railway Station) Granja Vila Nova de Gaia
  • This huge shell was used to store holy water at the main door entrance
  • José I (1714 –1777), "the Reformer" ("o Reformador"), King of Portugal and the Algarves The New Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Nova de Coimbra)
  • Marquis of Pombal The New Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Nova de Coimbra) is the current bishopric seat of the city of Coimbra. The Cathedral is located near the historical University in the upper part of the town (Alta de Coimbra). The New Cathedral was, originally, the church of the Jesuit Formation house of Coimbra, established in the city in 1543. In 1759, the Jesuit Order was banned from Portugal by the Marquis of Pombal, Prime-Minister of King José I.
  • In 1772, the bishopric seat was transferred from the old Romanesque Cathedral of the city (now called the Old Cathedral of Coimbra) to the vacant, spacious and more modern Jesuit church.
  • The New Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Nova de Coimbra)
  • The New Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Nova de Coimbra)
  • The New Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Nova de Coimbra)
  • The New Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Nova de Coimbra)
  • The 17th-century choir stalls
  • The New Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Nova de Coimbra) The 17th-century choir stalls of the main chapel were brought from the Old Cathedral, as well as the beautiful stone baptismal font, carved by Pero and Felipe Henriques in late Gothic-manueline style in the beginning of the 16th century
  • The New Cathedral of Coimbra (Sé Nova de Coimbra)
  • Long before Shakespeare's «Romeo and Juliet», in the 14th century Portugal witnessed a real passion and love story. Featured by Pedro, King of Portugal, and Inês de Castro, crowned Queen after her death. The King fell madly in love with Inês, his wife's maid. This forbidden love ends in tragedy when King Afonso IV, Pedros father, orders the assassination of Inês de Castro. Monastery of Santa Clara (old) where Inês was assassinated.
  • The Monastery of Santa Clara was built to replace the mediaeval Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha, located nearby, which at the time was prone to frequent flooding by the waters of the Mondego river. The feminine monastery (classified as a National Monument) was built in the 17th and 18th centuries and is founded in the early 14th century near the river Mondego by Queen Elizabeth, wife of King Dinis I. The queen was greatly admired during and after her life for her pious and generous nature, and was canonised in the 17th century.
  • All nuns as well as the Gothic tombs of Queen Elizabeth and other royal princesses were transferred to the new monastery, thereby called "Santa Clara-a-Nova”
  • Princess Elizabeth (Isabel) of Aragon, who became the queen of King Dinis of Portugal, and ultimately was raised to the honors of the altar as St. Elizabeth of Portugal, was born in Saragossa, Spain, around 1271. The daughter of King Pedro III of Aragon and Queen Constanza, she was named for her great-aunt St. Elizabeth of Hungary.
  • Before Elizabeth entered her teen years, several European monarchs sought her hand. King Edward IV of England solicited her for his son, the crown prince, as did the king of Sicily, the king of France, and others. As was the custom, Elizabeth's parents weighed the political advantages of each proposed match. The greatest benefit, they concluded, would ensue from a matrimonial alliance with King Dinis of Portugal. Elizabeth became his wife, by proxy. She was around 12 years of age, while King Dinis was 20.
  • Queen Elizabeth died on July 4th, 1336. She was 65 years of age, perhaps somewhat older, and had incorporated into her passage through this earth prayers, sacrifices, interventions for peace among monarchs, acts of worship, and works of mercy too numerous to mention. Almost three centuries after her death, His Holiness Pope Urban VIII canonized St. Elizabeth of Portugal on Holy Trinity Sunday, May 25th, 1625.
  • The side chapels and main chapel house a total of 14 altarpieces of gilt woodwork (talha dourada) from the late 17th-century style. The main altarpiece, in particular, is an outstanding example of the so-called "national" style (estilo nacional).
  • The main altarpiece, incorporates the tomb of the Saint Queen Elizabeth, founder of the monastery, made of silver and crystal, encharged in 1614 to artisans Domingos Lopes and Manuel Moreira. The statue of the Saint Queen Elizabeth is a 19th century work by sculptor António Teixeira Lopes.
  • Much of this complex served until recently as an army barracks. Now available to the visitor is the entrance courtyard, the enormous baroque cloisters and the magnificent interior of the church. Queen Isabel´s solid silver tomb is on display and a series of panels shows how her tomb was moved from Santa Claraa-Velha to its new location.
  • Convento de Santa-Clara-a-Nova
  • Tomb of Saint Isabel Mosteiro de Santa Clara-a-Nova in Coimbra, Portugal. It is by the sculptor Mestre Pero
  • Tomb of Saint Isabel Mosteiro de Santa Clara-aNova by the sculptor Mestre Pero
  • The Miracle of the Roses from Valerio Castello Hermitage St. Petersburg Francisco de Zurbarán (1598 1664) Santa Isabel de Portugal Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid Zurbarán has portrayed the saint as wearing the clothes of the 17th century notwithstanding the fact that Saint Isabel of Portugal (1271 – 4 July 1336)lived centuries before.
  • Coimbra seen from Mosteiro de Santa Clara-a-Nova
  • Text and pictures: Internet Copyrights of the photos belong to each photographer Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound: Coimbra - Samaritana