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The "Ode of Remembrance" is an ode taken from Laurence Binyon's poem "For the Fallen", which was first published in The Times in September 1914. ...

The "Ode of Remembrance" is an ode taken from Laurence Binyon's poem "For the Fallen", which was first published in The Times in September 1914.
The poet wrote For the Fallen, which has seven stanzas, while sitting on the cliffs between Pentire Point and The Rumps in north Cornwall, UK. A stone plaque was erected at the spot in 2001 to commemorate the fact.

Over time, the third and fourth stanzas of the poem (although often just the fourth) were claimed as a tribute to all casualties of war, regardless of state.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young.
Straight of limb, true of eyes, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

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  • Yet another great presentation ,well researched and presented.
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  • Lieutenant Colonel Sir Ernest Edward "Weary" Dunlop (12 July 1907 – 2 July 1993) was an Australian surgeon who was renowned for his leadership whilst being held prisoner by the Japanese during World War II.
  • The "Ode of Remembrance" is an ode taken from Laurence Binyon's poem "For the Fallen", which was first published in The Times in September 1914. The poet wrote For the Fallen, which has seven stanzas, while sitting on the cliffs between Pentire Point and The Rumps in north Cornwall, UK. A stone plaque was erected at the spot in 2001 to commemorate the fact. The plaque bears the inscription For The Fallen Composed on these cliffs 1914 The poem honoured the World War I British war dead of that time and in particular the British Expeditionary Force, which had by then already had high casualty rates on the developing Western Front. The poem was published when the Battle of the Marne was foremost in people's minds.
  • Over time, the third and fourth stanzas of the poem (although often just the fourth) were claimed as a tribute to all casualties of war, regardless of state. They went with songs to the battle, they were young. Straight of limb, true of eyes, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted, They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them.
  • "Waltzing Matilda" is Australia's most widely known bush ballad, a country folk song, and has been referred to as "the unofficial national anthem of Australia” The title is Australian slang for travelling by foot with one's goods in a "Matilda" (bag) slung over one's back. The song narrates the story of an itinerant worker, or swagman, making a drink of tea at a bush camp and capturing a sheep to eat. When the sheep's owner arrives with three police officers to arrest the worker for the theft (a crime punishable by hanging[citation needed]), the worker commits suicide by drowning himself in the nearby watering hole, and then goes on to haunt the site.
  • The original lyrics were written in 1895 by poet and nationalist Banjo Paterson. It was first published as sheet music in 1903. Extensive folklore surrounds the song and the process of its creation, to the extent that the song has its own museum, the Waltzing Matilda Centre in Winton, Queensland. The song was first recorded in 1926 as performed by John Collinson and Russell Callow. This recording of "Waltzing Matilda" was added to the National Film and Sound Archive's Sounds of Australia Registry in 2008.
  • The words to the song were written in 1895 by Banjo Paterson, a famous Australian poet, and the music was written (based on a folk tune) by Christina Macpherson, who wrote herself that she "was no musician, but she would do her best." Paterson wrote the piece while staying at the Dagworth Homestead, a bush station in Queensland. While he was there his hosts played him a traditional Celtic folk tune called "The Craigeelee", and Paterson decided that it would be a good piece to set lyrics to, producing them during the rest of his stay.

Transcript

  • 1. CANBERRA The Australian Capital Territory 3 http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1180655-canberra3/
  • 2. The Australian Capital Territory is the capital territory of the Commonwealth of Australia and is the smallest self-governing internal territory. It is enclaved within New South Wales and is regularly referred to as Australia's 'Bush Capital'.
  • 3. The constellation of the Southern Cross is a significant navigational feature of the southern hemisphere, strongly places Australia geographically and has been associated with the continent since its earliest days. The supporters of the coat of arms of Canberra are the Australian black swan, representing the Australian Aborigines, and the European white swan, representing the white settlers. The floral emblem of the ACT is the Royal Bluebell and the faunal emblem is the Gang-gang Cockatoo. Gang-gang Cockatoo (Wikipedia)
  • 4. Named in honour of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps of World War I, ANZAC Parade joins Gallipoli Reach of Lake Burley Griffin in the south and the Australian War Memorial to the north, is on the main axis between Parliament House and Mount Ainslie
  • 5. National Gallery Parliament War Memorial
  • 6. The Parade is flanked by Eucalyptus trees on gently sloping banks either side of the three-lane, one-way roads centred by a wide parade ground topped with granulated rock (similar to scoria) with planted boxes of a low bush called Hebe. The Eucalypts are Australian; and the Hebe comes from New Zealand. ANZAC Parade is used for ceremonial occasions and is the site of many major military memorials.
  • 7.  
  • 8. The Australian War Memorial The Australian War Memorial combines a shrine, a world-class museum, and an extensive archive.
  • 9. The Memorial's purpose is to commemorate the sacrifice of those Australians who have died in war. Its mission is to assist Australians to remember, interpret and understand the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact on Australian society.
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12. Entombed among the mosaics of the Hall of Memory is the Unknown Australian Soldier, whose remains were returned from a WWI battlefield in 1993 and who symbolizes all Australian war casualties
  • 13. “ Here is their spirit, in the heart of the land they loved; and here we guard the record which they themselves made”.   Charles Bean, 1948
  • 14. “ They went with songs to the battle, they were young”
  • 15. “ They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old”
  • 16. “ At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them”
  • 17. “ They went with songs to the battle, they were young...……”
  • 18.  
  • 19. Australia has never been invaded in its just over two centuries existence but it has sent its soldiers overseas on numerous occasions. In the first and second world wars to Europe, to Korea, and to Vietnam. This memorial is to honour the scores of soldiers that have died in those situations. More recently Australia has also sent soldiers to Timor, the Solomon Islands and Iraq but these were fairly smooth operations with minimal casualties.
  • 20.  
  • 21. Anzac Day is a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand, and is commemorated by both countries on 25 April every year to honour the members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who fought at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. It now more broadly commemorates all those who died and served in military operations for their countries.
  • 22.  
  • 23.  
  • 24. “ and never forget…”
  • 25. Canberra Text: Internet Pictures : ♦ Sanda Foişoreanu ♦ Doina Grigora ş ♦ Lucia Buzdugan ♦ Ioan Mara Arangement : Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Waltzing Matilda - Priscilla Herdman