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Banteay Kdei, Srah Srang
 

Banteay Kdei, Srah Srang

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Sras Srang is one of the few reservoirs at Angkor still holding water. It was completed during the reign of Rajendravarman in the late 10th century. Sras Srang means "royal bathing pool," and was ...

Sras Srang is one of the few reservoirs at Angkor still holding water. It was completed during the reign of Rajendravarman in the late 10th century. Sras Srang means "royal bathing pool," and was originally far larger than any pool today—at least 350 by 700 meters.
Banteay Kdei is a mysterious temple. There is no record of why it was built—or by whom—because no marker stone with that information has ever been found. Its name means "The citadel of the monks' cells", but that does not necessarily indicate its function. What is known is that Banteay Kdei grew by amalgamation from a small site to a large central temple with its own enclosure wall that protected a large city.
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If you are interested in Cambodia, please see also: http://www.slideshare.net/tag/cambodgia

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  • Sras Srang Reservoir (late 10th century) Srah Srang is a man-made body of water located just east of Banteay Kdei. Although it is one of the smallest baray, this reservoir has been there for nine hundred years and is still being used today. Situated to the east of the entrance to Banteay Kdei, Srah Srang offers superb views of sunrise. Originally constructed by Kavindrarimathana, the same architect that built Pre Rup and Prasat Bat Chum, Srah Srang was remodelled by Jayavarman VII during his massive construction boom. Banteay Kdei is an ancient Angkor ruin located on the western shore of the man-made reservoir, Srah Srang. It was built as a Buddhist monastic complex by Jayavarman VII, the prolific ruler who constructed much of Angkor's temples. By the time Banteay Kdei was built, much of the good quality stones have been exhausted. Hence it was built mostly using low quality sandstone. Due to the poor quality of the material used, much of Banteay Kdei is today crumbling. And to make matters worse, the craftsmanship was also poor. I have to say that Jayavarman VII was big on quantity but not on quality. AsiaExplorers , researched and written by Timothy Tye .
  • Sras Srang is one of the few reservoirs at Angkor still holding water.  It was completed during the reign of Rajendravarman in the late 10th century, and was designed by the architect Kavindrarimathana, whose name has miraculously survived.  Sras Srang means "royal bathing pool," and was originally far larger than any pool today—at least 350 by 700 meters. 
  • Kavindrarimathana apparently cared for the project deeply, leaving instructions at nearby Bat Chum Temple (which he also designed) that warned people not to pollute the water with bathing animals or to trammel the dikes with elephant herds.  Nevertheless, Sras Srang was modified two centuries later by King Jayavarman VII, who faced the dikes with sandstone and added a beautiful boat landing (seen in the picture).  He also shortened the reservoir slightly.  Sras Srang is thought to have been a natural lake, which helps explain why it still holds water. Asian Historical Architecture a Photographic Survey Bibliography:     Cohen, Joan Lebold.  Angkor: The Monuments of the God Kings     Harry N. Abrams, Inc.  New York. 1975     Freeman, Michael and Roger Warner.  Angkor: The Hidden Glories     Houghton Mifflin Company.  Boston.  1990     Jacques, Claude.  Angkor: Cities and Temples     River Books Co., Ltd.  Thailand. 1997.
  • D’après les inscriptions lapidaires, la zone autour du bassin du Sras Srang aurait été en partie occupée à partir de la première moitié du IX e  siècle . Au début du X e  siècle , les grands travaux commencent avec le roi Yasovarman I qui entreprend la construction d’un vaste réservoir, le baray oriental nommé Yaçodharatatâka. Au milieu du X e  siècle , Rajendravarman II investit ensuite la zone et y conduit de grands travaux de constructions de temples, de réhabilitation d’ouvrages antérieurs, de routes. Il construit ainsi le premier état du bassin du Sras Srang et réalise des travaux hydrauliques tels la dérivation de la rivière de Siem Reap.
  • A la fin du XII e  siècle , Jayavarman VII fait construire les temples monumentaux de Banteay Kdei et de Ta Prohm et réaménage le bassin du Sras Srang. Des fouilles ont été menées par Bernard-Philippe Groslier au début des années 60 à l'Ouest du bassin du Sras Srang. Elles ont permis d’établir que le terrain est resté vierge de toute occupation jusqu’au X e  siècle . Ensuite, plusieurs phases se sont succédé jusqu’au début du XV e  siècle . Les fouilles ont mis à jour deux états du bassin du Sras Srang, des campements et des ateliers datant de l’époque de la construction de Banteay Kdei et du Sras Srang ainsi qu’une nécropole
  • . Celle-ci s’étendrait également le long de la bordure Nord du bassin du Sras Srang. Là, des jarres emplies de bouddhas, et d’objets en bronze ont été trouvées. Cette pratique s’est poursuivie dans la période post angkorienne de façon plus épisodique. Le rapport mentionne qu’au XV e  siècle , le temple de Bantey Kdei sera réutilisé comme monastère bouddhique et transformé en pagode. Les inscriptions du X e  siècle indiquent que l'eau était amassée là pour le bien de toutes les créatures, à l'exception des éléphants , briseurs de digues. *(wikipedia)
  • Banteay Kdei Temple (mid 12th-early 13th centuries) Banteay Kdei is a mysterious temple.  There is no record of why it was built—or by whom—because no marker stone with that information has ever been found.  Its name means "The citadel of the monks' cells", but that does not necessarily indicate its function.  What is known is that Banteay Kdei grew by amalgamation from a small site to a large central temple with its own enclosure wall that protected a large city. (Asian Historical Architecture a Photographic Survey)
  • Banteay Kdei (Prasat Banteay Kdei) is a temple at Angkor , Cambodia . It is located southeast of Ta Prohm and east of Angkor Thom . Built in the late 12th to early 13th centuriesCE during the reign of Jayavarman VII , it is a Buddhist temple in the Bayon style, similar in plan to Ta Prohm and Preah Khan , but less complex and smaller. Its structures are contained within two successive enclosure walls, and consist of two concentric galleries from which emerge towers, preceded to the east by a cloister.
  • This monastic complex is currently dilapidated due to faulty construction and poor quality sandstone . Banteay Kdei has been occupied by monks at various intervals over the centuries, but the inscription stone has never been discovered so it is unknown to whom the temple is dedicated. (wikipedia)
  • BACKGROUND Banteay Kdei has not been restored and allows the visitor to experience what it may have looked like originally. Changes and additions account for is unbalanced layout. Banteay Kdei was built of soft sandstone and many of the galleries and porches have collapsed. The wall enclosing the temple was built of reused stones.
  • LAYOUT The temple is built on the ground level use as a Buddhist monastery. The elements of the original design of Banteay Kdei seem to have been a Central Sanctuary, a surrounding gallery and a passageway connected to another gallery. A moat enclosed the original features of the temple. Another enclosure and two libraries were among the additions in the Bayon period. The outer enclosure (700 by 500 meters 2,297 by 1,640feet) is made of laterite and has four entry towers.
  • A rectangular courtyard to the east is known as 'the hall of the dancing girls', a name derived from the decoration which includes dancers
  • The entry tower of the second enclosure is in the shape of a cross with three passages; the two on either end are connected to the literate wall of the enclosure 320 by 200 scrolls of figures and large female divinities in niches. In the interior court there is a frieze of Buddha.
  • A causeway of a later date, bordered with serpents, leads to the entry tower of the third enclosure. It comprises a laetrile wall includes a gallery with a double row of sandstone pillars that open onto a courtyard. Tip Parts of this area have been walled in and passage is limited.
  • The naga causeway leads to the Hall of Dancers, Banteay Kdei. Vestiges of the wooden ceiling can still be seen in the central Sanctuary. The galleries and halls, which join it in a cross to the four entry towers, are probably additions. Two libraries open to the west in the courtyards on the left and right of the causeway. www.tourismcambodia.com/.../ banteay _ kdei .asp
  • Banteay Kdei At this Mahayana Buddhist monastic complex at least two different styles are evident, relating to Angkor Vat and Bayon styles. Various sanctuary towers were also apparently joined only after their construction by a system of galleries and vestibules that exploit the use of the cloister. Changes and additions to the design following the original construction result in the sometimes confused and unbalanced present-day layout. The ensemble is on a single level and consists, within two successive enclosure walls, of two concentric galleries from which emerge towers, preceded to the east by a cloister. This temple is similar in design and architecture to Ta Prohm and Preah Khan, although smaller and less complex. There is no information concerning the exact dedication of this temple, and a 10th century inscription found in the western gopura of the second enclosure has been noted to have been sculpted on re-used stones possibly from the neighbouring temple of Kutisvara.
  • The east gopura entrance in the outer laterite enclosure (as are the other axial entrances) is surmounted by smiling Lokesvara visages similar to those at Ta Prohm, and the doorway flanked by garudas in each corner. The large Buddhist cruciform terrace immediately in front of the temple is slightly raised and decorated with naga and garuda-balustrades and lions that are in the Bayon style. As at Ta Prohm and Preah Khan, there is a vast rectangular hall that perhaps served as a space for ritual dance. The square columns, like those at the entrances to the Bayon, are decorated with paired or single dancing apsara sculpted in low-relief. Bas-relief dvarapala flank the entrances, surrounded by devata. The central sanctuary, which still carries some traces of sculpture, was probably rough-cut in order to receive a metal facing.
  • The gopura of the third enclosure is cruciform in plan, has internal columns and is covered by vaults. In the internal courtyard and walls of porches are Buddha images defaced in the period following Jayavarman VII's reign. The vaults of these outer galleries, constructed in both laterite and sandstone, has in places, collapsed. Access from the rear of this complex leads to the eastern entrance of Ta Prohm temple. In 2001, a team from the University of Sophia (Japan) uncovered 274 fragment pieces of Buddhist sculpture while pursuing a research excavation in Banteay Kdei. Most of the excavated statues are sculpted from sandstone and these were found together with a small number of metal artifacts. www.autoriteapsara.org/.../ banteay _ kdei .html

Banteay Kdei, Srah Srang Banteay Kdei, Srah Srang Presentation Transcript

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  • SRAH SRANG
  • Arhitectul regelui R âjendravarman (944-968) care a construit templul de stat Pre Rup readucând capitala la Angkor, se numea Kavîndrârimathana şi este singurul arhitect khmer al cãrui nume se cunoaşte. El a construit pentru el însuşi templul Bat Chum şi bazinul Srah Srang (deşi numele lui actual înseamnã „bazinul regal”). Bazinul şi-a pãstrat apa mai bine de un mileniu iar inscripţiile din secolul X menţionează cã apa a fost adunatã aici pentru binele tuturor fiinţelor, mai puţin elefanţii „distrugãtori de diguri ” .
  • Debarcaderul actual (contemporan cu templul Banteay Kdei situat vis-a-vis) a fost construit de Jayavarman VII
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  • Sec XII - Sec XIII BANTEAY KDEI
  • Construit de regele Jayavarman VII (1181-1215) ca templu budist (pe locul unui templu hindus din secolul X) se aseamãnã cu templul Ta Prohm: un sanctuar central înconjurat de incinte cu galerii compacte situat în centrul unei vaste incinte exterioare (700x500m), limitatã de un zid de laterit prevãzut cu patru porţi-turn cu patru feţe
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  • Devata şi pasãrea Garuda , pe poarta de rãsãrit
  • Devata şi pasãrea Garuda , pe poarta de rãsãrit
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  • Terasa orientală, păzită de lei gardieni şi mărginită de balustrade Nâga
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  • Angkor Fotografii: ♦ Nicoleta Leu ♦ Sanda Foişoreanu ♦ Sanda Negruţiu Prezentare: Sanda Foişoreanu Muzică: ♦ Smithsonian Folkways - Mohori