http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1384745-new-zealand-arts-crafts2
Aotearoa is the most widely known and accepted Māori name for New Zealand. The originalderivation of Aotearoa is not known...
Maori culture has historically been oral. This means theyhad no written language to pass on cultural heritage. Asa result ...
Even upon today the designs and their symbolism still tell the wonderful Maori tales. That’swhy Maori symbols form such a ...
The elaborate artistic traditions of theMaori have in common that the largedeal, if not all, make use of these Maorisymbol...
Tiki is one of the most popular Maorisymbols. Also known as an emblem of othercultures belonging to the Polynesian culture...
Tiki or heitiki are traditionalornaments created by Maori, thePolynesian first settlers of NewZealand. The material they a...
The Maori name                                           for the South                                           Island, T...
The ornament is unique to New Zealand, asare several other ornaments made from thisstone.
The exact meaning of the tiki symbol is disputed.There are several opinions but the most acceptedare that tiki stands for ...
Other theories state that tiki represents thehuman embryo, or the Maori god Tiki who wasconsidered responsible for the cre...
The symbology of Maori tiki has been much debated.The name tiki (penis) is one which is applied to stonestatues elsewhere ...
They are thought of by some as fertility symbols, but strangely given theirname, the detail of many of them shows female r...
Tiki remain prestige items in New Zealand today; heirlooms in Maori families andoccasionally in Pakeha (non-Maori) ones as...
One theory interprets detail on tiki as representing common birth deformities(club foot etc.) and suggests they are a tali...
The Maori have occupied NewZealand since about 1100 AD.The historical origins of tiki are notunderstood as they are virtua...
Double and Triple Twist is an eternity symbol.Refers to the bond between peoples or culturesrather than individuals. Tradi...
Matau (Fish Hook)Originally the Maorihave been fishermen.Their main foodsource was the seaso a fish hook of highquality wa...
Matau (Fish Hook)Worn around the neck the hookbecame a symbol of prosperity,abundance, good health, power,authority, and r...
Pūkeko is the common name, derived fromthe Māori language, for the Purple Swamphen(Porphyrio porphyrio) in New Zealand
Pūkeko are known for their bold scheming and determination. In times past they raided gardensfor kūmara (sweet potato) and...
In New Zealand the Pūkeko ismentioned in the Māori myth How theKiwi lost her wings in which severalbirds of the forest are...
The Pūkekos excuse is that it looks toodamp down there, and he does not wantto get his feet wet. The Pūkeko ispunished for...
By one account the Pukeko is the spawn of Punga (the ancestor of sharks and reptiles - enemiesof the people) but was claim...
Text: Internet                                 Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu                                                 ...
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
New Zealand arts and crafts2
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New Zealand arts and crafts2

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Maori culture has historically been oral. This means they had no written language to pass on cultural heritage. As a result carvings and other art forms flourished as a means to pass on ancestry, major historic events, beliefs, legends, and other cultural elements. Even upon today the designs and their symbolism still tell the wonderful Maori tales. That’s why Maori symbols form such a substantial part of the national Maori identity and culture.

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  • Muchas gracias Anais por elegir favorita esta presentación
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  • @1456789 Gracias Pilar. Recuerdo muy bien esa emoción cuando he visto la primera vez!
    Usted puede ver más de Nueva Zelanda: busca en mi página principal tag NEW ZEALAND
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  • Preciosa presentación Michaela, muy interesantes estas obras maoris, me han sorprendido mucho, nunca las había visto y me han parecido fantásticas. Gracias Michaela, Pilar
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  • Thank you Ceca, thank you very much for adding my presentation as your favorite
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New Zealand arts and crafts2

  1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1384745-new-zealand-arts-crafts2
  2. 2. Aotearoa is the most widely known and accepted Māori name for New Zealand. The originalderivation of Aotearoa is not known for certain. The word can be broken up as:ao = cloud, tea = white and roa = long, and it is therefore usually glossed as "the land of thelong white cloud".
  3. 3. Maori culture has historically been oral. This means theyhad no written language to pass on cultural heritage. Asa result carvings and other art forms flourished as ameans to pass on ancestry, major historic events,beliefs, legends, and other cultural elements
  4. 4. Even upon today the designs and their symbolism still tell the wonderful Maori tales. That’swhy Maori symbols form such a substantial part of the national Maori identity and culture.
  5. 5. The elaborate artistic traditions of theMaori have in common that the largedeal, if not all, make use of these Maorisymbols.Some of the most well known symbolsor designs are Tiki Twist Koru
  6. 6. Tiki is one of the most popular Maorisymbols. Also known as an emblem of othercultures belonging to the Polynesian culture.According to legends Tiki was the first manon earth who originated from the stars. Thefirst mortal person who created the firstwoman after his image.
  7. 7. Tiki or heitiki are traditionalornaments created by Maori, thePolynesian first settlers of NewZealand. The material they aremost commonly made from isnephrite, a stone related to jade,found in several places in NewZealands South Island. It iscalled pounamu in Maori,greenstone in common NewZealand English.
  8. 8. The Maori name for the South Island, Te Wai Pounamu, refers to the stone.There are traditional accounts for the creation of the stone which relate it to the children of Tangaroa.It is a very hard stone and is laborious to work, especially so with the basic grinding tools available tothe Neolithic Maori.
  9. 9. The ornament is unique to New Zealand, asare several other ornaments made from thisstone.
  10. 10. The exact meaning of the tiki symbol is disputed.There are several opinions but the most acceptedare that tiki stands for fertility, and is a good luckcharm meant to keep evil spirits away.
  11. 11. Other theories state that tiki represents thehuman embryo, or the Maori god Tiki who wasconsidered responsible for the creation of life.
  12. 12. The symbology of Maori tiki has been much debated.The name tiki (penis) is one which is applied to stonestatues elsewhere in Polynesia. It is the name of amale demigod which appears often in Polynesianmythology and is unquestionably ancient.
  13. 13. They are thought of by some as fertility symbols, but strangely given theirname, the detail of many of them shows female reproductive organs.
  14. 14. Tiki remain prestige items in New Zealand today; heirlooms in Maori families andoccasionally in Pakeha (non-Maori) ones as well. They are worn by Maori on ceremonialoccasions and occasionally by Pakeha too where they have acquired them through somehistorical event. Sometimes they are ceremonially displayed rather than worn.
  15. 15. One theory interprets detail on tiki as representing common birth deformities(club foot etc.) and suggests they are a talisman to protect against such things.
  16. 16. The Maori have occupied NewZealand since about 1100 AD.The historical origins of tiki are notunderstood as they are virtuallyabsent from the archaeologicalrecord. For a precious item this isnot surprising.
  17. 17. Double and Triple Twist is an eternity symbol.Refers to the bond between peoples or culturesrather than individuals. Traditionally given as anoffering of friendship between different tribes.Maori twist symbols also refer to the so called‘three baskets of knowledge’. This is a conceptthat, very roughly translated, has to do with how,the for humankind necessary knowledge tosurvive, came to the world. According to the legendthe god Tane (creator of the first man Tiki) broughtdown those three baskets from the heavens.
  18. 18. Matau (Fish Hook)Originally the Maorihave been fishermen.Their main foodsource was the seaso a fish hook of highquality was avaluable item toposses.
  19. 19. Matau (Fish Hook)Worn around the neck the hookbecame a symbol of prosperity,abundance, good health, power,authority, and respect for the sea andits life in it. It is also believed toprovide good luck and safety whiletraveling over water
  20. 20. Pūkeko is the common name, derived fromthe Māori language, for the Purple Swamphen(Porphyrio porphyrio) in New Zealand
  21. 21. Pūkeko are known for their bold scheming and determination. In times past they raided gardensfor kūmara (sweet potato) and taro. A stubborn, annoying person was compared metaphoricallyto the bird, and was said to have Pūkeko ears (taringa Pākura)They are known to steal eggs from each other and this is an indication of their character
  22. 22. In New Zealand the Pūkeko ismentioned in the Māori myth How theKiwi lost her wings in which severalbirds of the forest are asked to comedown from the trees to eat the bugs onthe ground and save the forest, but allgive excuses except the Kiwi who iswilling to give up his colours and theability to fly.
  23. 23. The Pūkekos excuse is that it looks toodamp down there, and he does not wantto get his feet wet. The Pūkeko ispunished for his reluctance and told hemust now live forever in the swamps.
  24. 24. By one account the Pukeko is the spawn of Punga (the ancestor of sharks and reptiles - enemiesof the people) but was claimed by relative (and high chief) Tawhaki. Tawhaki cut himself whilecutting timber and so daubed the Pukekos forehead with his own blood to signify their bond. Sothe mischievous Pukeko gets his character from Punga and his noble badge from Tawhaki
  25. 25. Text: Internet Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Arangement: Sanda FoişoreanuSound: E Papa - Kiri te Kanava www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda E Papa - The Herbs
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