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Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic
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Alphonse Mucha12, The Slav Epic

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Mucha spent many years working on The Slav Epic cycle, which he considered his life's masterwork. He had dreamed of completing such a series, a celebration of Slavic history, since the turn of the 19th century; however, his plans were limited by financial constraints. In 1909, he managed to obtain grants by an American philanthropist and keen admirer of the Slavic culture, Charles Richard Crane. He began by visiting the places he intended to depict in the cycle: Russia, Poland and the Balkans, including the Orthodox monasteries of Mount Athos. Additionally, he consulted historians regarding details of historical events in order to ensure an accurate depiction. In 1910, he rented part of the castle in Zbiroh and began working on the series.

Mucha continued working on the cycle for 18 years, gradually submitting paintings to the city of Prague as he completed them. In 1919, the first part of the series comprising eleven canvases was displayed in the Prague's Clementinum. In 1921, five of the paintings were shown in New York and Chicago to great public acclaim.

In 1928, the complete cycle was displayed for the first time in the Trade Fair Palace in Prague, the Czechoslovak capital.

Alfons Mucha died in July, 1939. Shortly before his death he was interrogated by the Gestapo, as he was an important exponent of public life in Czechoslovakia. During World War II, the Slav Epic was wrapped and hidden away to prevent seizure by the Nazis.

Following the Czechoslovak coup d'état of 1948 and subsequent communist takeover of the country, Mucha was considered a decadent and bourgeois artist, estranged from the ideals of socialist realism. The building of a special pavilion for the exposition of the Slav Epic cycle became irrelevant and unimportant for the new communist regime. After the war, the paintings were moved to the chateau at Moravský Krumlov by a group of local patriots, and the cycle went on display there in 1963.
After a two-year dispute over Alfons Mucha's Slav Epic between Prague and the Moravian town of Moravský Krumlov, the renowned cycle of 20 monumental canvases was,

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  • Thank you Anca for your support
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  • @carmadruga
    I love you so much Carmen (also Mucha!!!) THANK YOU
    He needed 18 years to paint this 20 canvases. Mucha conceived it as a monument for all the Slavonic peoples and he devoted the latter half of his artistic career to the realisation of this work.
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  • He was almost so quick painting as you doing shows my friend! I would have needed years to paint a canvas like these ones!
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  • Thank you so much Carmen and John for your support and Friendship, THANK YOU!
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  • This is great,I love these large canvases,Thank you Michaela,bravo.
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  • The Slav Epic – Apotheosis of the Slavs (Detail)
  • Following his death at the stake for his teachings, Jan Hus became a symbol of the Czech fight against the immoral conduct of the Catholic Church. Increasing numbers of Czech clergymen began to turn their back on papal rule and to deliver their sermons in the Czech language. They were declared heretics by the Papacy and the Council of Constance ordered that they be removed from their parishes. Charles University in Prague was also closed to ensure that their teaching ceased. Riots ensued and Hus’ followers began to gather in remote places outside the city walls in order to mount their rebellion.
    Mucha depicts the most important of these gatherings which took place at Křížky, south of Prague, on 30 September 1419. Koranda, a radical preacher, called on Hus’ followers to take up their arms to defend their faith. He stands praying on a makeshift pulpit facing the throngs of followers as they arrive at Křížky. The dark sky above announces the imminent devastation of the Hussite Wars.
  • n 1566, the Turkish army advanced upon the city of Sziget in their campaign to expand the Ottoman Empire eastwards. Under the leadership of the Croatian nobleman Nikola Zrinski, the inhabitants of Sziget and the surrounding area gathered within the city walls and closed the gates. When the Turkish soldiers finally broke down the fortifications 19 days later, Zrinski refused to surrender. Despite his courageous efforts to push his army out of the city, he and his men were killed in a ferocious assault. When Zrinski’s wife Eva saw that the Turks had taken the city, she decided to set fire to the city walls, killing countless soldiers and halting the Turks’ advance into Central Europe.
    Mucha’s composition immortalises Eva’s decision to sacrifice the city and many of its inhabitants in order to protect her country from the Turks. A column of black smoke bellows up from the spot where she has thrown a burning torch. To the left of the column, the men prepare for the final assault while, to the right, the women attempt to hide from the Turks.
  • The Unity of the Brethren formed in Bohemia in 1457. Informed by the teachings of Jan Hus and Petr Chelčicky, the Brethren believed that education was the key to true faith. In the Bohemian town of Ivančice – Mucha’s birthplace – Brethren scholars produced a Czech translation of the New Testament. Later known as the Bible of Kralice when printing transferred to the nearby town of Kralice, this work became an important symbol of Czech national identity and was instrumental in keeping the Czech language alive.
    Mucha depicted his home town of Ivančice on a sunny autumn day. The industrious Brethren gather around the printing press to inspect the first printed pages. In the foreground a young student reads to an old man. He looks out to the viewer and his stern expression seems to foretell the impending persecution that will force the Brethren to flee the country.
  • Antonín Dvořák: Antonín Dvořák: Symphony No.9 4/4 - New York Philharmonic
    The chateau in the town of Moravský Krumlov in the South Moravian Region of the Czech Republic.
    Antonín Dvořák spent the years between 1892 - 1895 working in America as the Director of the National Conservatory of Music in New York. It was during this time that he wrote Symphony No. 9, "From the new World". This symphony was the one that brought him the most resounding success in 1893 when it was first performed. He was sending "notes" back to his friends and famiy in Czechoslovakia from the New World, America.The Symphony No. 9 in E Minor "From the New World", Op. 95, B. 178, popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 during his visit to the United States from 1892 to 1895. It is by far his most popular symphony, and one of the most popular in the modern repertoire. In older literature and recordings this symphony is often indicated as Symphony No. 5
  • Transcript

    • 1. 12 http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-2200022-mucha12/
    • 2. The Slav Epic is a cycle of 20 large canvases painted by Alfons Mucha between 1910 and 1928. The cycle depicts the history of Czechs and other Slavic peoples. Mucha bestowed the cycle upon the city of Prague on condition that the city build a special pavilion for it. As of 2010, the work wass a part of the permanent exhibition at the chateau in the town of Moravský Krumlov in the South Moravian Region of the Czech Republic. As of July 2012 all 20 works are displayed together on the ground floor of the Veletr níž Palace in an exhibition organized by the National Gallery in Prague (exhibition catalogue: Alfons Mucha - Slovanská epopej). Mucha conceived The Slav Epic (Slovanská epopej) series of twenty monumental canvases (the largest measuring over 6 by 8 metres) depicting the history of the Slav people and civilization as a monument for all the Slavonic peoples and he devoted the latter half of his artistic career to the realization of this work.
    • 3. In 1928, the complete cycle was displayed for the first time in the Trade Fair Palace in Prague, the Czechoslovak capital. Alfons Mucha died in July, 1939. Shortly before his death he was interrogated by the Gestapo, as he was an important exponent of public life in Czechoslovakia. During World War II, the Slav Epic was wrapped and hidden away to prevent seizure by the Nazis.
    • 4. Between 1911 and 1926 Mucha’s energy was taken up with the creation of the Slav Epic. For this project he rented a studio and an apartment in Zbiroh Castle in Western Bohemia (now a luxury hotel) to benefit from the spacious studio enabling him to work on enormous canvases
    • 5. 'The Slav Epic' cycle No.1: The Slavs in Their Original Homeland (1912) tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 6. tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 7. 'The Slav Epic' cycle No.1: The Slavs in Their Original Homeland (detail) Between the Turanian Whip and the Gothic Sword
    • 8. 'The Slav Epic' cycle No.1: The Slavs in Their Original Homeland (1912)
    • 9. 'The Slav Epic' cycle No.1: The Slavs in Their Original Homeland (1912) -Between the Turanian Whip and the Gothic Sword tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 10. Veletrzni Palace (National Gallery), Prague
    • 11. As of July 2012 all 20 works are displayed together on the ground floor of the Veletr ní Palace inž an exhibition organized by the National Gallery in Prague
    • 12. The Slav Epic' cycle No.2: The Celebration of Svantovít (1912) When the Gods are at War, Salvation is in the Arts 610 x 810 cm
    • 13. 2.The Celebration of Svantovít (1912) Festival on the Island of Rugin
    • 14. 'The Slav Epic' cycle No.3: Introduction of the Slavonic Liturgy in Great Moravia (1912) To Praise the Lord in One’s Native Tongue tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 15. 'The Slav Epic' cycle No.3: Introduction of the Slavonic Liturgy in Great Moravia (1912) To Praise the Lord in One’s Native Tongue tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 16. 'The Slav Epic' cycle No.3: Introduction of the Slavonic Liturgy in Great Moravia (1912) To Praise the Lord in One’s Native Tongue tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 17. 'The Slav Epic' cycle No.3: Introduction of the Slavonic Liturgy in Great Moravia (1912) To Praise the Lord in One’s Native Tongue tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 18. 'The Slav Epic' cycle No.4: Tsar Simeon I of Bulgaria (1923) The Founder of Slavonic Literature tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 19. The Slav Epic' cycle No.5: King P emysl Otakar II ofř Bohemia: The Union of Slavic Dynasties (1924) egg tempera on canvas 405 x 480 cm
    • 20. The Slav Epic' cycle No.6: The Coronation of the Serbian Tsar Stepan Dusan as East Roman Emperor - The Slavic Code of Law tempera on canvas 405 x 480 cm
    • 21. In 1911, Mucha had returned from USA to Prague – never to return to Paris – and began creating his magnum opus: The Slav Epic. In over fifteen years of work, he created 20 paintings measuring nearly 18 by 20 feet each. Ten of the paintings depict historical events related specifically to the Czech nation.
    • 22. The Slav Epic' cycle No.7: Milic of Kromeriz the construction of the refuge for penitent prostitutes (1916) egg tempera on canvas 620 x 405 cm
    • 23. The Slav Epic' cycle No.8: Master Jan Hus Preaching at the Bethlehem Chapel: Truth Prevails (1916) egg tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 24. The Slav Epic' cycle No.9: The Meeting of Krizky(1916) egg tempera on canvas 620 x 405 cm.
    • 25. The Slav Epic' cycle No.10: After the Battle of Grunewald (1924) The Solidarity of the Northern Slavs egg tempera on canvas 405 x 610 cm.
    • 26. The Slav Epic' cycle No.11: After the Battle of Vitkov - God Represents Truth, not Power egg tempera on canvas 405 x 620 cm
    • 27. The Slav Epic' cycle No.12: Petr Celcicky Do not repay evil with evil 1918 egg tempera on canvas 405 x 620 cm.
    • 28. The Slav Epic' cycle No.12: Petr Celcicky: Do not repay evil with evil (1918) Details
    • 29. The Slav Epic' cycle No.13: Hussite King Jiri z Podebrad - Treaties are to be Observed
    • 30. The Slav Epic' cycle No.14: The Defence of Sziget by Nikola Zrinski - The Shield of Christendom (1914) tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 31. The Slav Epic' cycle No.15: The Printing of the Bible of Kralice in Ivancice - God Gave us a Gift of Language (1914) tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 32. The Slav Epic' cycle No.16: Jan Amos Komensky A Flicker of Hope tempera on canvas 405 x620 cm 1918 tempera on canvas 405 x 620 cm
    • 33. In his will, Mucha bequeathed the Slav Epic to the city of Prague, on condition that they build a special pavilion to house them.
    • 34. The Slav Epic' cycle No.17: Holy Mount Athos Sheltering the Oldest Orthodox Literary Treasures tempera on canvas 405 x 480 cm
    • 35. The Slav Epic' cycle No.18: The Oath of Omladina under the Slavic Linden Tree - The Slavic Revival 1928 tempera on canvas 420 x 620 cm cm
    • 36. It took the artist almost 20 years to complete his masterpiece, which he finished in 1928 In 1936 the Artist published his memoirs "Three Statements on My Life and Work". Two years later, in 1938, Czechoslovakia was taken over by Nazi Germany, as a result of the Munich Agreement between the governments of Germany, Britain and France (Czechoslovakia was never invited to the negotiations). Since the suppression of nationalism was high on the agenda of the conquerors, Mucha, with his history of patriotism and Pan-Slavism, was arrested and incarcerated by the Gestapo. Already an old man by this time, the painter caught pneumonia and died on 14th July, 1939.
    • 37. By the time of his death, Mucha's style was considered outdated and old-fashioned. However, his son, author Jiri Mucha, devoted much of his life to writing about him and bringing attention to his art. Interest in Mucha's distinctive style experienced a strong revival in the 1960's with a general interest in Art Nouveau
    • 38. The Slav Epic' cycle No.19: The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia - Work in Freedom is the Foundation of a State 1914 tempera on canvas 610 x 810 cm
    • 39. Building a pavilion for enormous Slav nationalist paintings wasn’t Prague’s top concern during World War II. Just keeping the paintings out of Nazi hands was challenge enough. The Slav Epic was rolled up and hidden. Unfortunately the end of the war wasn’t much help, as the Soviet-backed Communist Party which took power in the 1948 Czech coup had no love for the “Epic”.
    • 40. The Slav Epic' cycle No.20: The Apotheosis of the Slavs - Slavs for Humanity tempera on canvas 480 x 405 cm
    • 41. The Mucha Foundation says that Prague’s main railway station is the best permanent home for the paintings. [The artist's grandson] John Mucha says that the foundation is in negotiations with the council about the plans. When describing the suitability of the venue, John Mucha says that the train noise can be screened, and appropriately the art nouveau station was designed by Josef Fanta, a friend of Alphonse Mucha.
    • 42. Sound: Antonín Dvo ák:ř Symphony No.9 4/4 - New York Philharmonic Text and pictures: Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi oreanuş www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda

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