Addis Ababa, Ethnological Museum3
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The Ethnological museum hosts the cultural aspects of the people and traditions of the tribes of Ethiopia. The museum is unique for the displays are according to life cycles in a human being. Attention is also given to different religions in Ethiopia: Christianity, Islam, Judaism, as well as traditional African beliefs. For each topic, information on posters is illustrated with artifacts and pictures.

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  • Ethnological MuseumNational Museum <br />
  • Ethnological MuseumNational Museum <br />
  • Addis Ababa Domestic Airport <br />

Addis Ababa, Ethnological Museum3 Addis Ababa, Ethnological Museum3 Presentation Transcript

  • http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-2138860-ethiopia13/
  • Addis Ababa (the name means 'new flower') is of fairly recent origin - Menelik II founded the city in 1887 but is an important administrative centre not only for Ethiopia but also for the whole of Africa. Situated in the foothills of the Entoto Mountains and standing 2,400 metres above sea level it is the third highest capital in the world. The city has a population of about four million.
  • The Ethnological museum hosts the cultural aspects of the people and traditions of the tribes of Ethiopia. The museum is unique for the displays are according to life cycles in a human being.
  • The first section about childhood, second adulthood and last topic is death & beyond practices of each Ethiopian tribes. Traditional tales & games of some tribes are displayed in the childhood. House making, hunting, handicrafts, beliefs, traditional medicines of different ethnic groups are further elaborated in the adulthood section.
  • Attention is also given to different religions in Ethiopia: Christianity, Islam, Judaism, as well as traditional African beliefs. For each topic, information on posters is illustrated with artifacts and pictures.
  • Eragrostis tef, teff, Williams lovegrass, annual bunch grass, taf is an annual grass, a species of love grass native to the northern Ethiopian Highlands and Eritrean Highlands of the Horn of Africa. Eragrostis tef has an attractive nutrition profile, being high in dietary fiber and iron and providing protein and calcium. Between 8000 and 5000 BC, the peoples of the Ethiopian highlands were among the first to domesticate plants and animals for food and teff was one of the earliest plants domesticated.[
  • Unique among African countries, Ethiopia has a written history of over 3,000 years dating back to Queen of Sheba and King Solomon
  • Ensete is a genus of monocarpic flowering plants native to tropical regions of Africa and Asia. It is one of the two genera in the banana family, Musaceae, and includes the false banana or enset (E. ventricosum), an economically important food crop in Ethiopia.
  • Pillows
  • Door
  • Catha edulis (khat, qat, or "edible kat”) is a flowering plant that is native to the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Among communities from these areas, khat chewing has a history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Khat contains a monoamine alkaloid called cathinone, an amphetamine-like stimulant, which is said to cause excitement, loss of appetite, and euphoria. In 1980, the World Health Organization (WHO) classified it as a drug of abuse that can produce mild-to-moderate psychological dependence (less than tobacco or alcohol), although WHO does not consider khat to be seriously addictive. The plant has been targeted by anti-drug organisations such as the DEA. It is a controlled substance in some countries, such as the United States, Canada and Germany, while its production, sale and consumption are legal in other nations, including Djibouti, Somalia, Ethiopia and Yemen.
  • Traditional book binding utensils Amharic Ethiopia as a multi ethnic state is often known as a mosaic of language and culture: more than 83 languages and 200 dialects are spoken throughout the country. The alphabet have 119 characters not 26.
  • The official language of Ethiopia is Amharic which is a Semitic language that is spoken by about 27 million people. The other language that is widely spoken in this country is the Oromo language. It is spoken by about 30% of the population
  • In the name of God, the Beneficent, the Merciful (Muslim calligraphy)
  • Traditional beehive
  • Traditional clothes in Ethiopia are made from traditional cloth called yahager lebs, meaning clothes of the countryside, which is made of cotton woven together in long strips. Men wear pants and a knee- long shirt with a white collar, and a sweater. Men and women both wear shawls (scarf ) called Netela
  • Ethiopia is the only country in Africa that has its own language that can be used in both spoken and written form. More than 83 languages are spoken using about 200 different dialects throughout Ethiopia.
  • Most likely due to the high altitude of Ethiopia, Ethiopians are known for being excellent long distance runners.
  • Almost 70% of all of the mountains in Africa can be found in Ethiopia Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital city is also Africa’s diplomatic capital. Ethiopia is as big as France and Spain combined in square kilometers.
  • Africa - for us still the unknown continent possesses a several thousands of years old culture. Expressed particularly in myths, legends, fables, in songs and proverbs
  • This scratch plow, or ard
  • This scratch plow, or ard, stands at the center of the agricultural system because of its simplicity
  • The ard (or scratch plough) is a rudimentary plough that is light, without a mouldboard, symmetrical on either side of its line of draft, and fitted with a symmetrical share that traces a shallow furrow but does not invert the soil (as opposed to a turnplough). For more than two thousand years, Ethiopia’s ox-plow agricultural system was the most efficient and innovative in Africa, but has been afflicted in the recent past by a series of crises: famine, declining productivity, and losses in biodiversity.
  • Ethiopians have many myths and legends. Some of these include the following: The Queen of Sheba and Her Only Son Menyelek (I) The Creation Myth In this myth, the creator god, Wak shuts a man in a coffin on flat Earth, and then made fire rain down. This formed mountains. Then he unearthed the man, and he was alive. Soon, the man became lonely so Wak took some of his blood and made a woman for the man to marry. They had 30 children, but the man was ashamed to have so many, so he hid 15. Wak then turned those children into animals and demons.
  • Dula is an Amharic word for a stick or staff. It can refer to any stick but in most cases it is the humble walking stick that is used throughout Ethiopia. The stick commonly called “dula” in Ethiopia may have been the first tool after all. Even today, the dula is still widely used to ward off wild animals and ensure that humans can travel from point A to point B without being eaten alive by the clawed and fanged beasts of the fields, forests, and savannas. The dula is also used as a deterrent against strangers, highway robbers and enemies. The lonely dula, however, did not remain for long as a plain regular stick. Like the staff of Moses, it has branched and flowered into many types of instruments and weapons. Hundreds of stick varieties evolved from the simple and lonely dula. It would be very difficult to include all the various types of sticks, staff, rods, and batons practiced by the eighty ethnic groups of Ethiopia. The majority of the dulas are from the main tribes of the Oromo, Amhara, Tigre and other tribes. The Ethiopian stick is usually made from hardwood or bamboo. It is fired or flamed to further harden it and oiled to preserve the integrity of the wood to prevent cracking. Dulas are also made from cedar wood (tid), acacia (grar), wild olive (weira), sycamore (warka), vines (hareg) and bamboo (shembeko Kerkeha and Reed). The most common term for sticks is dula. The dula can be a walking stick, a guard's zebegna stick, or any type of long well oiled and flamed stick about four to five feet in length. The term dula will therefore be used as a generic word for stick in describing the dula stick culture of Ethiopia.
  • Text: Internet Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu Alin Samochis Sanda Negruţiu Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi oreanuş www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound: Alemayehu Eshete - Kehak Atsewirugn