The Global Partnershipand Its ImplementationMs Eun-jin ParkPermanent Mission to the InternationalOrganizations in ViennaRe...
Table of ContentsI The Launch of the Global PartnershipII Making the Global Partnership WorkIII Global Partnership and the...
I The Launch of the Global Partnership
 Globally: Set a New Milestone for InternationalDevelopment Cooperation New global partnerships for development New par...
Post-Busan Interim Group(PBIG)Post-Busan Interim Group (PBIG) was established inJanuary 2012 Chair +25 representatives f...
Global Partnership:Mandates Para 36(a) of the Busan outcome document“The Global Partnership will offer “an open platform ...
Global Partnership: Memberships and Role of other processesMembership: Open to all actors in development that endorsethe ...
Global Partnership: Working ArrangementsRegular Ministerial Meeting Key forum for political dialogue and decision making...
Global Partnership: Working ArrangementsCo-chairs of the Global Partnership (3)1 Recipient of development cooperation1 Rec...
Global Partnership: Global Monitoring Framework Key Principle: ‘Global Light, Country focused’ 10 Global Monitoring Indi...
☞ The Launch of the Global Partnershipfor Effective Development Cooperationmeansa Farewell to the Working Party on AidEffe...
II Making the Global Partnership Work
Key Elements for Success Leadership by Developing Countries based ontheir ownership and capacity Donors’ actions to fulf...
Key commitmentswith specific deadlines(1/2)Untying Aid: Review the plans to accelerate ourefforts to untie aid in 2012 (B...
Key commitmentswith specific deadlines(1/2)Predictability: Provide available, regular, timelyrolling three-to five year i...
☞ Frameworks for Success are ready !!☞ All development partners should feelthe pressure on their commitments andgo into AC...
III Global Partnership and the Post-2015 Framework
After the MDGs: Key changesDeepened globalization and inter-connected worldEmergence of new development actors: emerging...
Post-2015 Development FrameworkTarget date for MDG achievement fast approachingPost-2015 needs to reflect on changed glo...
Nexus between GP and post-2015 (1/2) Comprehensive & Inclusive Partnership of GP☞ is a new reality Post-2015 needs to ado...
‘OECD-UNDP Joint Support Team’ as part of GPworking arrangement☞ could provides a valuable experience for similararrangem...
☞ Busan Global Partnership could provideessential building blocks for theimplementation & monitoring of the Post-2015 Deve...
Thank You
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Open Dialogue MICs Conference 2013 Vienna May 8, Presentation by Korea

345 views
280 views

Published on

Thematic Dialogue on Environmental Sustainability and Green Industry, Inclusive Growth and Prosperity and Financing for Sustainable Economic Development

Published in: Technology, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
345
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Good morning. It is my pleasure and honor to be here to attend this Open Dialogue on Middle-Income Countries about Busan Global Partnership and its implementation. I hope today’s discussion can contribute to better organizing the forthcoming High level Conference of Middle income countries.
  • My presentation will comprise of the following three topics.
  • I will start out by elaborating on the context and the details of the “Launch of the Global Partnership.” As some of you might know, the “Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation” was formally launched June 2012, at the final meeting of the Working Party on Aid Effectiveness.
  • The launch of the Global Partnership follows the decision reached by the participants to the Busan High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness, which was held in 2011. The Busan Forum resulted in significant outcomes, both for the international community and Korea. Globally, it set a new milestone for international development cooperation by agreeing on the formation of a new global partnership for development. - It also opened a new paradigm for development cooperation, moving beyond the technical focus on ‘aid effectiveness’ to an inclusive consideration of improving development effectiveness. - Finally, it signified a shift from a OECD-centered discussion to a joint partnership between the OECD and the UN. By involving the UNDP as a full partner, the Busan Forum helped give greater legitimacy to the new partnership. For Korea, the host country, the Busan Forum was an opportunity to share its development experience with the world. - As a country that has risen from the ranks of the least development countries to a donor country in a single generation, Korea played a bridging role between traditional donors and emerging economies in negotiating the agenda and the outcome document of the Busan Forum. As a result of its active outreach to countries like China and India, the outcome document was successfully endorsed by all participants. - It was also great experience to assume a role as co-chair.
  • As a follow-up measure to the Busan Forum, the PBIG was established in early 2012, consisting of 25 or more chairs representing key development actors, as well as three observers. Over three meetings, they formulated a proposal for the new Global Partnership, which was adopted by the WP-EFF at its final meeting in June 2012. The proposal outlined the following details for the Global Partnership, which I will explain in further detail one by one.
  • Para 36(e) of the Busan outcome document describes the mandate of the Global Partnership : “to provide a forum for the exchange of knowledge and the regular review of progress.” As such, the Global Partnership will : (read).
  • The Global Partnership is open to all development actors that endorse the Busan agreement. By bringing in a wide rage of stakeholders, it is expected that different actors will play an active role in defining their roles and commitments within the framework of the Busan agreement. The Partnership will also engage actively with regional organizations, international fora such as the UNDCF and the G20, as well as voluntary alliances such as the thematic Building Blocks that arose from the Busan Forum. They will help spread knowledge and promote consultative dialogue to provide valuable input for improving the Partnership.
  • The Working Arrangements of the Global Partnership consist of three pillars : the regular ministerial meeting, the steering committee, and the OECD-UNDP joint secretariat. The Ministerial Meeting will provide a key forum for political decision making and focus on the implementation of commitments agreed at the Busan Forum. Venues and timing of meetings will be flexible to ensure maximum efficiency. The Steering Committee will play a supporting role to the ministerial meeting, setting the agenda and acting as ‘ambassadors’ of the Global Partnership. The composition of the Committee is as follows : (briefly skip to next slide). Finally, there is the OECD-UNDP Joint Secretariat. The Secretariat will provide support for day-to-day functioning of the Steering Committee.
  • A monitoring framework for the Global Partnership was decided upon at the final meeting of the Working Party on Aid Effectiveness in June 2012. It is based on the principle of ‘global light, country focused’ which was agreed at the Busan Forum. It means that the main emphasis will be on forming partnerships at the country level, with the global partnership playing a supporting role, providing political momentum and lessons learned. Ten indicators were selected, most with a baseline year of 2010 and a target year of 2015. To reduce the burden on countries, the indicators will make use of existing sources, to be complemented by data collected at the country level. The indicators themselves are yet to be further developed, as several of them have been newly incorporated, whereas others have been carried forth from the Paris Declaration and Accra commitments.
  • To summarize, (read). It reflects a true break from the past and created an opportunity to forge a new partnership that better reflects the realities of the global development scene today.
  • I have outlined to you the key facts about the Global Partnership. Now the question comes to, “how do we make it work?”
  • I believe the key elements for the success of the new Global Partnership are the following : Leadership by developing countries based a sense of ownership and capacity-building. Donors’ actions to fulfill their commitments for development assistance. This most importantly includes providing assistance for developing countries’ capacity building , which links to the first element. Enhanced engagement and participation of emerging economies is also important, in particular given the changing development landscape where south-south cooperation and triangular cooperation are gaining a more and more significant role. In other words, participation and ownership of all actors involved are key.
  • Keeping these key principles in mind, here are the key commitments of the Busan agreement that require our immediate attention : untying aid, transparency, and predictability. Each had a deadline either within the year 2012 or 2013. On untying aid , the Busan agreement stipulates that participants will : (read). On transparency, participants have agreed to : (read). In this context, a common, open standard for electronic publication of information on resources was adopted at the final meeting of the Working Party on Aid Effectiveness in June, based on the works of the IATI partner countries and CSOs. The work builds on the two existing standards – the DAC CRS/FSS and IATI.
  • On predictability, the Busan agreement states that participants will : (read).
  • As such, the Busan agreement and the Global Partnership provide a concrete framework for success. Given concrete deadlines and guidance on how to implement their commitments made at the Busan High Level Forum, all development partners must take action to fulfill their promises.
  • My final topic is the relationship between the “Global Partnership and the Post-2015 Framework.”
  • As you are well aware, eight Millennium Development Goals, or MDGs, were established following the adoption of the Millennium Declaration in 2000 with the aim of encouraging development by improving social and economic conditions of the world’s poorest countries. Since then, there have been major changes in the international development scene. - Globalization has deepened and the world has become more inter-connected than every before, meaning that the task of development has become the responsibility of every country, regardless of their economic development stage. - Recent years have seen the emergence of new development actors other than the traditional OECD DAC member countries. They include emerging economies, civil society, private sector, and local governments. - There are new/re-emerged & inter-dependent development challenges, while poverty and inequality remain the central challenge. - The “one-size-fits-all,” “top-down approach” is no longer valid, and the demand for a different nature, modalities and responsibilities in development cooperation are rising.
  • With the target year for achieving the MDGs less than three years away, we must therefore think of creative approaches to formulating the post-2015 development framework. The post-2015 discussions need to take into account the aforementioned changes in the global development landscape in order to better meet new challenges. Consultations for shaping the post-2015 development framework have already begun within and beyond the United Nations. A notable forum is the “UN Secretary General’s High Level Panel on Post-2015 Development Agenda,” which our own Foreign Minister is a member of. Within these consultations, we must take into account the clear nexus between the post-2015 development framework and the Global Partnership.
  • Let me elaborate on the nexus a little further. First, the Global Partnership is a partnership that is truly comprehensive and inclusive of all development stakeholders : traditional donors, emerging economies, partner countries, the civil society, the private sector, etc. This is a new reality the post-2015 discussions will need to adopt. Second, the Global Partnership rests on several key principles that include : ownership by developing countries; focus on results; inclusive development partnership; and transparency and accountability. These principles could likewise provide valuable guiding principles for the post-2015 implementation mechanism. Third, as I mentioned earlier on, the ‘global light, country focused’ principle of the Global Partnership -- which emphasizes the role and responsibility of individual country while the international society plays a guiding or supporting role -- could provide a reference for a principle of flexible and effective monitoring system for the post-2015 as well.
  • Fourth, the ‘OECD-UNDP Joint Secretariat’ of the Global Partnership can serve as a model for joint venture, or a synergetic partnership, between key organizations in the development field. The post-2015 framework could also think of similar arrangements between the UN and the World Bank, for example. Finally, the Ministerial Meeting of the Global Partnership is an effective forum that can provide a strong political momentum for the implementation of the Busan agreement, and also facilitate the sharing of experiences between countries. Since we already have such an arrangement in place, we could likewise think of making use of this valuable forum for building consensus on post-2015.
  • At its first plenary meeting Sep. 25,2012 many UNSG’s High Level Panel members proposed that the post-2015 framework include a monitoring mechanism for the implementation of post-MDGs. Based on the five points that I have highlighted to you, the ROK believes that the Busan Global Partnership’s multi-stakeholder mechanism can provide a strong vehicle for the implementation of post-MDGs at both the country and global levels.
  • Open Dialogue MICs Conference 2013 Vienna May 8, Presentation by Korea

    1. 1. The Global Partnershipand Its ImplementationMs Eun-jin ParkPermanent Mission to the InternationalOrganizations in ViennaRepublic of Korea
    2. 2. Table of ContentsI The Launch of the Global PartnershipII Making the Global Partnership WorkIII Global Partnership and the Post-2015 Framework
    3. 3. I The Launch of the Global Partnership
    4. 4.  Globally: Set a New Milestone for InternationalDevelopment Cooperation New global partnerships for development New paradigm: ‘Aid and Beyond’ From ‘OECD’ to ‘OECD/UN Joint Partnership’ Korea as host country Sharing development experience Bridging role between traditional donors and emergingeconomies in the negotiation process ‘Global Korea’BUSAN : What has beenachieved?
    5. 5. Post-Busan Interim Group(PBIG)Post-Busan Interim Group (PBIG) was established inJanuary 2012 Chair +25 representatives from donors, developingcountries, OECD, UN IPU, civil society (India, Chian, Brazilas observers) Met 3 times (February, April, May)Final WP-EFF meeting in June 2012 adopted the PBIG’sproposals on the Global Partnership Nature and mandates of the Global Partnerships ToRs and membership of governance structure Secretariat support to the GP Global-level monitoring indicators and targets
    6. 6. Global Partnership:Mandates Para 36(a) of the Busan outcome document“The Global Partnership will offer “an open platform that embracesdiversity, providing a forum for the exchange of knowledge and theregular review of progress” Core functions of the Global Partnership Maintain and strengthen political momentum for moreeffective development cooperation Ensure accountability for implementing Busan commitments Facilitate knowledge exchange and sharing of lessons learned Support implementation of Busan commitments at thecountry level
    7. 7. Global Partnership: Memberships and Role of other processesMembership: Open to all actors in development that endorsethe Busan Partnership agreementRole of regional organizations: Support the implementationof Busan commitments by facilitating knowledge sharing andconvening constituenciesRole of Building Blocks: continue to exist as self standingalliances , but the GP welcomes inputs from them to inform itswork and to support political dialogueRelations with other global fora and processes:Engagement with the UN DCF, the G20 to build synergies andsubstantive complementarity
    8. 8. Global Partnership: Working ArrangementsRegular Ministerial Meeting Key forum for political dialogue and decision making with GP Focusing on implementation of commitments and actionsagreed to in the Busan Partnership agreement Participating from Governments, NGOs, Private Sector, etc Meeting every 18-24 months venue and timing of meetings flexibleSteering Committee Supporting the ministerial platform, providing the strategicleadership, coordination and oversight for the GP 3 Co-chairs + 15 members Meeting every 6-12 months or more frequently as requiredOECD-UNDP Joint Secretariat
    9. 9. Global Partnership: Working ArrangementsCo-chairs of the Global Partnership (3)1 Recipient of development cooperation1 Recipient and provider of development cooperation1 Provider of development cooperationMembers of the Steering Committee (15)5 Representative of recipient of development cooperation, one of whichis representative of the g7+ group of fragile and conflict-affectedstates1 Representative of recipients and providers of developmentcooperation3 Representative of providers of development cooperation1 Representative of private sector stakeholders1 Representative of parliamentarians1 Representative of civil society stakeholders1 Representative of multilateral development banks1 Representative of the UNDP/UNDG Composition of Steering Committee
    10. 10. Global Partnership: Global Monitoring Framework Key Principle: ‘Global Light, Country focused’ 10 Global Monitoring Indicators selected Developing countries’ systems are strengthened and used; Aidis untied; Development cooperation is more predictable;Transparency; Mutual accountability, etc Civil society; Engagement & contribution of the private sector;Gender equality & women’s empowerment, etc Baselines and Targets 2010 as the baseline year, 2015 as the target year Data Sources: Existing int’l source + Collected at country level
    11. 11. ☞ The Launch of the Global Partnershipfor Effective Development Cooperationmeansa Farewell to the Working Party on AidEffectiveness (WP-EFF) !!
    12. 12. II Making the Global Partnership Work
    13. 13. Key Elements for Success Leadership by Developing Countries based ontheir ownership and capacity Donors’ actions to fulfill their commitments,combined assistance for developing countries’ capacitybuilding Enhanced engagement and participation ofEmerging Economies
    14. 14. Key commitmentswith specific deadlines(1/2)Untying Aid: Review the plans to accelerate ourefforts to untie aid in 2012 (BPd 18e)Transparency: Agree on a common, open standardfor electronic publication of timely, comprehensiveand forward-looking information on resourcesprovided through development cooperation by 2012,with the aim of implementing fully by December2015 (BPd 23c)☞ a common, open standard adopted (June 2012)
    15. 15. Key commitmentswith specific deadlines(1/2)Predictability: Provide available, regular, timelyrolling three-to five year indicative forwardexpenditure and/or implementation plans todeveloping countries by 2013 (BPd 24 a)Agree on principles and guidelines on reducing theproliferation of multilateral channels by the end of2012 (BPd 25b)Agree on principles that will guide our actions toaddress the issue of countries that receive insufficientassistance by the end of 2012 (BPd 25c)
    16. 16. ☞ Frameworks for Success are ready !!☞ All development partners should feelthe pressure on their commitments andgo into ACTION !!
    17. 17. III Global Partnership and the Post-2015 Framework
    18. 18. After the MDGs: Key changesDeepened globalization and inter-connected worldEmergence of new development actors: emergingeconomies, civil society, private sector, foundations, localgovernments, etcNew/re-emerged & inter-dependent developmentchallenges while poverty and inequality remain the centralchallengeNo one-size-fits-all, No top-down approach any more,and enhanced demands for different nature, modalities andresponsibilities in development cooperation
    19. 19. Post-2015 Development FrameworkTarget date for MDG achievement fast approachingPost-2015 needs to reflect on changed globaldevelopment landscapeGlobal discussion & efforts for shaping Post-2015Development Framework began within and beyond theUN UN Secretary General’s High-Level Panel on post-2015 & others☞ Clear Nexus between post-2015 developmentframework and the Global Partnership
    20. 20. Nexus between GP and post-2015 (1/2) Comprehensive & Inclusive Partnership of GP☞ is a new reality Post-2015 needs to adopt Key shared principles of GP (ownership by developingcountries; Focus on results; Inclusive development partnership;Transparency and accountability)☞ could provide guiding principles for Post-2015implementation mechanism‘Global Light, Country Focused’ principle of GP☞ could provide a reference for principle of flexible& effective monitoring system of Post-2015
    21. 21. ‘OECD-UNDP Joint Support Team’ as part of GPworking arrangement☞ could provides a valuable experience for similararrangements for post-2015 implementation (UN-World Bank Joint Secretariat?)Ministerial Meeting of GP tomaintain/strengthen political momentum & andsharing lessons of GP☞ could provide a valuable High-Level, PoliticalPlatform for building consensus on Post-2015 andits implementationNexus between GP and post-2015 (2/2)
    22. 22. ☞ Busan Global Partnership could provideessential building blocks for theimplementation & monitoring of the Post-2015 Development Framework,by serving as a strong vehicle for theimplementation of the Post-2015 at both thecountry and global levels.
    23. 23. Thank You

    ×