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Social Media in the ABM (MLA) Sector opportunities and challenges
Hei! Jeg heter Mia I work for the Science Museum, London. I’ve also worked for the Museum of London (UK), the Çatalhöyük R...
What about you? How many of you are active on: Facebook? MySpace? LinkedIn? Twitter? Flickr? specialist social networking ...
Opportunities <ul><li>build relationships with audiences </li></ul><ul><li>demonstrate relevance </li></ul><ul><li>improve...
Challenges <ul><li>from one official voice to many </li></ul><ul><li>resources - content creation, community management </...
Improve discoverability <ul><li>discoverability means making content more findable </li></ul><ul><li>making it easier for ...
Improve discoverability
Increase visits http://mymuseumoflondon.org.uk/blogs/blog/museum-of-london-and-social-software-effectiveness-of-facebook-o...
Enhance your collections <ul><li>Opportunities to collect within ‘living memory’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Great War Archive’ as...
Enhance your collections
Enhance your collections
Re-use existing work
Audiences The web has changed our audiences and changed their expectations about content and interactivity: mash-up, re-us...
It’s 2009 “ The ten most heavily used web brands account for  45% of total UK internet time . Facebook is the most heavily...
Go where your audiences are <ul><li>UK government:  </li></ul><ul><li>Using existing social networks can “open doors for c...
Go where your audiences are
Go where your audiences are
Go where your audiences are In the first year on Flickr Commons:  “ over  750,000 image views , with around  2,000 comment...
Getting the project design right <ul><li>pitch the goal, not the method - don’t pick a solution too early </li></ul><ul><l...
Questions?
Questions about audience <ul><li>Where do they already congregate online?  </li></ul><ul><li>How will they discover your c...
Questions about audience <ul><li>Are they experts or novices?  </li></ul><ul><li>How will they negotiate issues of authori...
Questions about audience <ul><li>Will they contribute to your own knowledge?  </li></ul><ul><li>Will their questions requi...
Questions about goals <ul><li>Is this really a web project?  </li></ul><ul><li>What does your organisation want to get out...
Questions about goals <ul><li>What resources are available during the content development and technical implementation pha...
Questions about goals <ul><li>Metrics are measurable outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Start by asking ‘what is both useful and m...
Questions about goals <ul><li>How will content and functionality be archived?  </li></ul><ul><li>How sustainable is the in...
Questions about goals <ul><li>Which existing standards and technologies can you use?  </li></ul><ul><li>How can you enable...
Questions about content <ul><li>What will draw audiences to your website, out of all the other sites on the internet?  </l...
Questions about content <ul><li>Who creates the content – the organisation, the audience? </li></ul><ul><li>Should the sit...
Questions about content <ul><li>How much authority can the museum share with audiences while remaining a trustworthy resou...
Thank you. Questions? Blog:  http:// openobjects.org.uk Twitter: @ mia_out
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Social Media in the ABM (MLA) Sector: opportunities and challenges

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Lecture on social media and museums, libraries and archives given to the The Norwegian Archive, Library and Museum Authority (ABM-utvikling) in Oslo, December 2009.

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  • In my current role, I act as web developer and producer; in the past I’ve worked as a web analyst and programmer as well as a consultant on digital programmes in cultural heritage.
  • Am not going to spend long on the challenges now, might come out in questions
  • Archive project found longer visits for visitors from “ Web 2.0 initiatives ... suggesting that they were users particularly interested in the resource” instead of random visits through Google ‘ First World War Poetry Digital Archive’ discussed in http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/marchionni/
  • Blog posts about objects - curator’s voice creates better relationship with readers; links from social media make the objects more visible in Google. Use visitor questions to write posts. Social media allows you to add layers of audience-focused content to your existing sites. Self-expression for curators and researchers. Can quickly address topical questions. About 1 hour per post. http://www.ssplprints.com/image.php?id=82768&amp;idx=6&amp;keywords=de%20havilland%20comet&amp;filterCategoryId=&amp;fromsearch=true http://sciencemuseumdiscovery.com/blogs/collections/flying-into-wroughton-thirty-years-on/
  • Crowdsourced corrections and research
  • Excellent match between content, goals and audience. Rewarded and recognised correctors.
  • Share your research processes. Once you have set up the process, it requires no extra effort but has benefits for visitors It sets a good example for visitors - learn by example Improves discoverability of authoritative sources
  • This can be challenging, but start with small projects and make time to reflect on the lessons you’ve learned
  • Where are your online audiences? Your website has to compete with that.
  • http://www.culture.gov.uk/images/research/CultureOnDemand.pdf http://www.slideshare.net/diusgovuk/how-are-young-people-using-social-media-presentation
  • Separate digitisation of images from big infrastructure builds - get the content right, learn about audiences, then build the big sites. Visually oriented audience.
  • Audience engagement - added to user galleries, favourited, added notes, comments, tags. Helped Library of Congress identify individuals, locations, events...
  • In an ideal world, the conversation would start before the project proposal has been written, before the overall goals of the project, audiences, key messages, etc have been set. The most obvious solution might not be the best, or the solutions suggested might not be taking advantage of improvements in technology and development methods.
  • http://www.forrester.com/Groundswell/profile_tool.html – set for Sweden as it doesn’t list Norway
  • Transcript of "Social Media in the ABM (MLA) Sector: opportunities and challenges"

    1. 1. Social Media in the ABM (MLA) Sector opportunities and challenges
    2. 2. Hei! Jeg heter Mia I work for the Science Museum, London. I’ve also worked for the Museum of London (UK), the Çatalhöyük Research Project (Turkey), Museum Victoria (Australia), the State Library of Victoria (Australia). I’ve been working on the internet since 1994. Blog: http:// openobjects.org.uk |Twitter: @ mia_out
    3. 3. What about you? How many of you are active on: Facebook? MySpace? LinkedIn? Twitter? Flickr? specialist social networking sites? mailing lists? YouTube/Vimeo? How many of you actively create and share content on: blogs tweets photos Videos Podcasts?
    4. 4. Opportunities <ul><li>build relationships with audiences </li></ul><ul><li>demonstrate relevance </li></ul><ul><li>improve content discoverability </li></ul><ul><li>take ABM to your audiences </li></ul><ul><li>enhance your collections </li></ul><ul><li>increase visits to your venues </li></ul><ul><li>re-use existing work </li></ul>
    5. 5. Challenges <ul><li>from one official voice to many </li></ul><ul><li>resources - content creation, community management </li></ul><ul><li>new models of authority and trust </li></ul><ul><li>popping the ‘bubble’ - bring audiences on social media back into ABM </li></ul><ul><li>audiences will talk back if you get it wrong - but don’t panic </li></ul><ul><li>getting the project design right </li></ul>
    6. 6. Improve discoverability <ul><li>discoverability means making content more findable </li></ul><ul><li>making it easier for the right people to discover your content when they want it </li></ul><ul><li>bringing engaged users directly to your content </li></ul><ul><li>improving the search engine visibility of your content </li></ul>
    7. 7. Improve discoverability
    8. 8. Increase visits http://mymuseumoflondon.org.uk/blogs/blog/museum-of-london-and-social-software-effectiveness-of-facebook-on-museum/ 18% of group members attended an event because they found out about it on the Facebook pages for the Museum of London
    9. 9. Enhance your collections <ul><li>Opportunities to collect within ‘living memory’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Great War Archive’ asked the general public for digitised versions of items in their possession relating to the First World War. </li></ul><ul><li>More than 6,000 submissions, including: </li></ul><ul><li>...diaries from Gallipoli, love letters from France, audio interviews with veterans, signals sent on Armistice, and a bullet dented tea tin that saved a soldier's life. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Enhance your collections
    11. 11. Enhance your collections
    12. 12. Re-use existing work
    13. 13. Audiences The web has changed our audiences and changed their expectations about content and interactivity: mash-up, re-use, re-mix
    14. 14. It’s 2009 “ The ten most heavily used web brands account for 45% of total UK internet time . Facebook is the most heavily used web brand, accounting for 13 percent of all UK Internet time – or one in every eight minutes . Communication and entertainment are central themes amongst most heavily used web brands” http://www.nielsen-online.com/pr/pr_090513_UK.pdf
    15. 15. Go where your audiences are <ul><li>UK government: </li></ul><ul><li>Using existing social networks can “open doors for cultural organisations trying to attract new, more diverse audiences ” </li></ul><ul><li>Forrester Research on young people and social media: </li></ul><ul><li>much bigger users of multimedia content online: podcasts, music, video </li></ul><ul><li>every day, half of younger teens use IM, a third visit YouTube and a quarter use social networking sites </li></ul><ul><li>young people read blogs and use social networking much more than average internet users - and nearly one in three are active bloggers </li></ul><ul><li>but they aren't social media geeks : they comment on things, but very few use RSS, wikis, tagging </li></ul>
    16. 16. Go where your audiences are
    17. 17. Go where your audiences are
    18. 18. Go where your audiences are In the first year on Flickr Commons: “ over 750,000 image views , with around 2,000 comments and 4,000 tags .” Photographer Hope’s images had previously been viewed “irregularly – perhaps 20 times” since the museum had owned them. By mid-2009 “the Hope photographs have been viewed around 400,000 times on Flickr Commons.”
    19. 19. Getting the project design right <ul><li>pitch the goal, not the method - don’t pick a solution too early </li></ul><ul><li>balance between audience, your goals, the content </li></ul><ul><li>questions to guide the process </li></ul>
    20. 20. Questions?
    21. 21. Questions about audience <ul><li>Where do they already congregate online? </li></ul><ul><li>How will they discover your content? </li></ul><ul><li>What physical or digital metaphors are they already familiar with? </li></ul><ul><li>How would the project integrate with their physical experience of the museum or exhibition? </li></ul>
    22. 22. Questions about audience <ul><li>Are they experts or novices? </li></ul><ul><li>How will they negotiate issues of authority and trust? </li></ul><ul><li>How will they engage with your content? </li></ul>
    23. 23. Questions about audience <ul><li>Will they contribute to your own knowledge? </li></ul><ul><li>Will their questions require a researched response or a simple acknowledgement? </li></ul><ul><li>If creating or sharing content, is it specialist material, reminiscence, “I like it/I've got one of those”, a creative response or a challenge? </li></ul>
    24. 24. Questions about goals <ul><li>Is this really a web project? </li></ul><ul><li>What does your organisation want to get out of this? </li></ul><ul><li>How open are you to learning from your audience? </li></ul><ul><li>How does this particular mode of access relate to your overall mission? </li></ul><ul><li>What's your appetite or capacity for risk? </li></ul><ul><li>How will you recognise success? </li></ul><ul><li>How would you alleviate failure? </li></ul>
    25. 25. Questions about goals <ul><li>What resources are available during the content development and technical implementation phases, and on an on-going basis? </li></ul><ul><li>Is funding time-limited, or does it require core resources for long-term success? </li></ul>
    26. 26. Questions about goals <ul><li>Metrics are measurable outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Start by asking ‘what is both useful and measurable?’ </li></ul><ul><li>Metrics and project design should be primarily driven by audience needs, not internal politics or concerns. </li></ul><ul><li>How well do your metrics match those set by the project funders or sponsors? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you measure a positive engagement or merely register a site visit? </li></ul>
    27. 27. Questions about goals <ul><li>How will content and functionality be archived? </li></ul><ul><li>How sustainable is the infrastructure? </li></ul><ul><li>What's your 'exit strategy' to allow for the failure of commercial or public partners? </li></ul><ul><li>Which existing standards and technologies can you use? </li></ul>
    28. 28. Questions about goals <ul><li>Which existing standards and technologies can you use? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you enable re-use of the museum- or user-generated content, both in terms of rights and programmatically re-usable data? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you re-use existing data produced by other organisations, or partner with others in the same field or aiming at the same audiences? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you publicly reflect on the lessons you'll learn during this project, to share both successes and failures? </li></ul>
    29. 29. Questions about content <ul><li>What will draw audiences to your website, out of all the other sites on the internet? </li></ul><ul><li>What types of content – how much interpretation, what media, which sources? </li></ul><ul><li>What is your content modelled on – wall captions, learning objectives, live tours, traditional museum models or something drawn from more general models – books, television, film, social media, debates? </li></ul>
    30. 30. Questions about content <ul><li>Who creates the content – the organisation, the audience? </li></ul><ul><li>Should the site provide for collaboration or comment? </li></ul><ul><li>How much room is there for audiences to make their own meaning? </li></ul><ul><li>Can audiences augment or edit museum content? </li></ul>
    31. 31. Questions about content <ul><li>How much authority can the museum share with audiences while remaining a trustworthy resource? </li></ul><ul><li>Can content be re-used outside the project? </li></ul><ul><li>How much context and knowledge is assumed about the topic, theory or object? </li></ul>
    32. 32. Thank you. Questions? Blog: http:// openobjects.org.uk Twitter: @ mia_out
    33. 33. Audiences
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