Mema introduction norwell 2013

301 views
249 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
301
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
22
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • FFY 2011 EMPG: MEMA has made approximately $2.2M available to Municipalities and Tribes. The EMPG (Emergency Management Performance Grant) is a DHS/FEMA grant awarded by FEMA to MEMA.   FFY 2010-2011 CCP: MEMA has made $393,000 available to registered CERTs. The CCP (Citizen Corps Program) is part of a DHS/FEMA grant awarded by FEMA to EOPSS, then MEMA. As a note, FEMA has discontinued the CCP grant beginning in FFY 2012   2012-2013 HMEP: MEMA has made available $108,523 to SERC-certified EPCs. The HMEP (Hazardous Materials Emergency Planning) is a US DOT grant awarded to MEMA.   MEMA, pending availability of funds, makes grant funds available through an open grant process. Grant applications are posted on MEMA’s website and eligible applicants are notified of grant opportunities by MEMA.
  • Mema introduction norwell 2013

    1. 1. Norwell Disaster Preparedness Workshop January 17,2013 1
    2. 2. •Our mission is to ensure the states resilience to disasters.•The program is committed to an all hazards approach toemergency management.•By building and sustaining effective partnerships withfederal, state and local government agencies, and with theprivate sector, the program strives to: •Ensure the Commonwealths ability to rapidly and effectively respond to and recover from large and small disasters by: •Assessing and mitigating hazards, •Enhancing preparedness, •Ensuring effective response, and •Building the capacity to recover. 2
    3. 3. •Massachusetts Civil Defense Agency •Formed in 1950 as a result of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 •Mandated that every State have a Civil Defense Agency •Massachusetts General Law 639 •Governor Dukakis’ Executive Order 144 of 1978 •Massachusetts Civil Defense Agency is responsible for the coordination for all activities undertaken by the Commonwealth and its political subdivisions in response to the threat or occurrence of emergencies or natural disasters.•Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency •Named officially changed in 1991 after Hurricane Bob 3
    4. 4. •Annual Budget $6.4 Million •State Funds (~25%) • $1.6 Million •Nuclear Power Plant Funds (~25%) • $1.6 Million •Federal Grant Funds (~50%) • $3.2 Million•Personnel •Full Time State Employees: 82 •Contractors: 16 (includes part time training instructors) 4
    5. 5. REGION 1 (Tewksbury) Essex REGION 3/4 (Agawam) SuffolkBerkshire MiddlesexFranklin (plus the town ofHampshire Brookline)HampdenWorcester REGION 2 (Bridgewater) Norfolk Bristol Plymouth Barnstable Nantucket Dukes 5
    6. 6. 6
    7. 7. • Ensuring local/state all hazards plans are written and maintained • Norwell Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan• Exercising plans, adjusting as necessary• Providing all hazards training• Assisting with grants management • 3 grant programs, providing $2,308,916 to communities • $2.2 Million: Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) • $393,000: Citizen Corps Program Grant (CCP) • $108,523: Hazardous Materials Emergency Planning Grant (HMEP)• Distributing various supplies and equipment to communities 7
    8. 8. 24/7 Dispatch Center at State Emergency Operations Center Monitoring “events” statewideStatewide Radio CommunicationsDepartment of Conservation and Recreation DispatchPrimary State Warning Point - Broadcast of Weather Alerts/ Advisories/ Warning Notification of major emergencies (large fires, etc) Radio Communications for Department of Environmental Protection Elevator/Escalator issues for Department of Public Safety Spill Response Hotline for Department of Environmental Protection Responder activation for Department of Fire Services Tsunami Warning Center Amber Alert Activation for Massachusetts State Police Emergency Alert System Weston Observatory 8
    9. 9. $1.5 Million in Mitigation Projects in 2012Lessen the damage….when it happens again. To provide funds to communities after a disaster to significantly reduce or permanently eliminate future risk to lives and property from natural hazards Earthquake – Mount Furniture Flood – Raise Elevation Wind – Heavy Gauge Garage Doors Atomic Bomb – Fall Out Shelter Power Outage – Generators 9
    10. 10. 10
    11. 11. •FLOOD • WINTER STORM • TORNADO/SEVERE THUNDERSTORM • DROUGHT• HURRICANE/ COASTAL STORM • FOREST FIRE • EARTHQUAKE • WINDSTORM • PANDEMIC 11
    12. 12. •HAZARDOUS MATERIALS • NUCLEAR POWER ACCIDENT • UTILITY EMERGENCY • CONFLAGRATION (URBAN FIRE) • TERRORISM • DAM FAILURE • WATER SUPPLY PROBLEMS • MAJOR TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT • CIVIL DISORDER/RIOT • SEARCH & RESCUE• MEDICAL SERVICE / BIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY •TERRORISM 12
    13. 13. ALL DISASTERS HAPPEN LOCALLY 13
    14. 14. All 351 communities in Massachusetts is required tohave an Emergency Management Director (EMD) 6.5 million people 14 Counties (FEMA thinks in “Counties”, as do other State EMAs) 350 EMDs (one on double duty) Police Chief Fire Chief Town Manager DPW Director Bus Driver Warrant Processor Just plain EMD (14) 14
    15. 15. 15
    16. 16. ESF 10 - Hazardous MaterialsESF 1 - Transportation & EnvironmentalESF 2 - Communications ESF 11 - Food & WaterESF 3 - Public Works ESF 12 - Energy & Engineering ESF 13 - Military SupportESF 4 - Firefighting ESF 14 - Public InformationESF 5 - Information & Planning ESF 15 – VolunteersESF 6 - Mass Care & DonationsESF 7 - Resource Support ESF 16 - Law EnforcementESF 8 - Health & Medical ESF 17 – Animal ProtectionESF 9 - Search & Rescue ESF 18 – Business & Industry 16
    17. 17. NON-IMPACTED VOLUNTEERS PRIVATE LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS RESOURCES LOCAL EMERGENCYRESOURCES CONTRACTS STATE OTHER AGENCIES STATE STATES LOCAL RESPONSE RESPONSE REQUEST FORMUTUAL VOLUNTEERS STATE ASSISTANCE AID REQUEST FOR FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS DISASTER FEDERAL OCCURS AGENCIES FEDERAL RESPONSE NON-IMPACTED STATES VOLUNTEERS 17
    18. 18. •Ice Storm (December ‘08)•Boston Marathon (April ‘08, ’09, ’10, ’11, ’12)•Flooding (March ‘10)•MWRA Water Emergency (May ‘10)•Hurricane Earl (September ’10)•Nor’easter (December 26-27, 2010)•Blizzard (January 12, 2011)•Major Winter Storm (February 2, 2011)•3 Tornados (June 1, 2011)•Tropical Storm Irene (August 28, 2011)•Major Winter Storm (October 29-30, 2011)•Hurricane Sandy (October 28-30, 2012) 18
    19. 19. MEMA, through FEMA, can provide federalreimbursement funding to communities andindividuals when involved in a federally declareddisaster.Thresholds exist- Presidential Declaration RequiredNot every disaster is declaredThe recovery process is coordinated with yourEmergency Management Directorwww.disasterassistance.gov 19
    20. 20. •Public Assistance (PA) •75%/ 25% split •Provides recovery funds to help repair damage to town infrastructure, buildings, roads, etc •Provides reimbursement for costs incurred to the response to the storm for •DebrisRemoval •Emergency Protective Measures •Police, Fire, DPW Overtime, Equipment Costs, etc 20
    21. 21. •Individual Assistance (IA) •Disaster Recovery Centers •Provides recovery grants to homeowners of primary residences to begin the recovery process •Temporary Housing Assistance •Repair Costs •Replacement •Permanent Housing Construction •Different threshold limits from Public Assistance•Other Needs Assistance (ONA) •Provides recovery grants for related medical, dental, funeral, and other expenses (such as some personal property) 21
    22. 22. 22
    23. 23. •Small Business Administration (SBA) •www.sba.gov •Not just for Businesses! •MEMA works with the SBA to provide low-interest loans to homeowners and businesses to help them recover from disasters •Examples of disasters which MAY be eligible •Large fires •Severe flooding •An SBA Disaster Declaration can be declared with or without a FEMA Disaster Declaration •Threshold for an SBA Declaration •Fivebusinesses suffering a 40% or more uninsured loss in income based on the previous year •Funds are used to continue operations, not rebuild •-OR- •25 homes or businesses suffering a 40% or more uninsured loss •Low interest loans can be made available to rebuild 23
    24. 24. •Mass 211 •Free statewide phone number to provide information to citizens 24/7, but also in times of disasters • Food •Shelter •Rent Assistance •Utility Bill Assistance •After-School Programs •Child Care •Counseling •Senior Services •Disaster Relief 24
    25. 25. •Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) •Private Non-Profit (PNP) Organizations •Clothing •Shelter •Food •Cleaning Supplies •Recovery Money •Volunteer Organizations •American Red Cross •Salvation Army •Faith-Based Organizations •Volunteerhome reconstruction •Debris Removal 25
    26. 26. •Massachusetts Department of Mental Health •Mental Health Screenings •Counseling•Massachusetts Department of Public Health •Vaccinations •Illness prevention•Department of Housing and Community Development •Housing assistance •Locating available places of residence and working with survivors•Department of Public Safety •State Building Inspectors 26
    27. 27. 1959 (Jan 2011 snowstorm) $19,217,1301994 (June 2011 tornados) $ 20,032,7583330 (Tropical Storm Irene Cat B) $4,788,9814028 (Tropical Storm Irene Major Dec) $15,393,5654051 (Oct 2011 snowstorm) $82,286,9924097 (Hurricane Sandy) $: TBD 27
    28. 28. 28
    29. 29. 29
    30. 30. 30
    31. 31. Richard LaTour, Jr. Local Coordinator Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency Region II, Bridgewater, MA Office: 508-427-0406 Cell: 617-828-5852 E-Mail: richard.latour@state.ma.us‘“NOT IF, BUT WHEN” http://www.mass.gov/mema 31

    ×