Sonnets

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  • There is another type known as Spenserian sonnet invented by Edmund Spenser but it did not gain as much popularity as the Petrarchan and Shakesperean.
  • Sonnets

    1. 1. THE SONNET<br />TYPES AND CHARACTERISTICS<br />
    2. 2. BACKGROUND<br /><ul><li>The sonnet originated in Sicily in the 13th Century with GiacomodaLentino (1188-1240), a lawyer., who wrote his poems in the Sicilian dialect of Italian
    3. 3. . Some authorities credit another Italian, Guittoned'Arezzo (1230-1294), with originating the sonnet.
    4. 4. The English word "sonnet" comes from the Italian word "sonetto," meaning "little song." Some early sonnets were set to music, with accompaniment provided by a lute. 
    5. 5. The Italian poet Petrarch (1304-1374), a Roman Catholic priest, popularized the sonnet more than two centuries before Shakespeare was born. Other popular Italian sonneteers were Dante Alighieri</li></li></ul><li><ul><li> The sonnet form was introduced in England by Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503-1542) and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1517-1547).
    6. 6. In Italy, England, and elsewhere between the 13th and early 16th Centuries, the most common theme of sonnets was love. Sonnets in later times also focused on religion, politics, and other concerns of the reading public.</li></li></ul><li>TYPES<br />SONNET<br />Shakespearean<br />Petrarchan<br />
    7. 7. What are the lines about? Do they tell a story?Do they speak about feelings?<br />PETRARCHAN<br />SHAKESPEAREAN<br />How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.<br />I love thee to the depth and breadth and height<br />My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight<br />For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.<br />When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes<br />I all alone beweep my outcast state,<br />And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,<br />And look upon myself, and curse my fate,<br />LYRIC<br />
    8. 8. How many lines do these sonnets have?<br />PETRARCHAN<br /><ul><li>When I consider how my light is spent
    9. 9. Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
    10. 10. And that one talent which is death to hide
    11. 11. Lodg'd with me useless, though my soul more bent
    12. 12. To serve therewith my Maker, and present
    13. 13. My true account, lest he returning chide,
    14. 14. "Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?“
    15. 15. I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent
    16. 16. That murmur, soon replies: "God doth not need
    17. 17. Either man's work or his own gifts: who best
    18. 18. Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
    19. 19. Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed
    20. 20. And post o'er land and ocean without rest:
    21. 21. They also serve who only stand and wait."</li></ul>SHAKESPEAREAN<br /><ul><li>Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
    22. 22. Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
    23. 23. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
    24. 24. And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
    25. 25. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines
    26. 26. And often is his gold complexion dimmed
    27. 27. And every fair from fair sometime declines
    28. 28. By chance or nature's changing course untrimmed:
    29. 29. But thy eternal summer shall not fade
    30. 30. Nor lose possession of that fair thou 1ow'st
    31. 31. Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade
    32. 32. When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st
    33. 33. So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
    34. 34. So long lives this, and this gives life to thee</li></ul>LYRIC<br />14 lines<br />
    35. 35. How many syllables are there per line?Notice the stress pattern of the lines<br />PETRARCHAN<br />SHAKESPEAREAN<br />How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.<br />I love thee to the depth and breadth and height<br />My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight<br />For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.<br />When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes<br />I all alone beweep my outcast state,<br />And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,<br />And look upon myself, and curse my fate,<br />LYRIC<br />14 lines<br />10 syllables<br />
    36. 36. How many syllables are there per line?What syllables have stress?U =unstressed; / =stressed<br />PETRARCHAN<br />SHAKESPEAREAN<br />How do I love thee? Let me <br />count the ways.<br />I love thee to the depth and <br />breadth and height<br />When in disgrace with <br />fortune and men's eyes<br />I all alone beweep my <br />outcast state,<br />U / U / U / U<br /> U / U / U <br /> / U / <br /> / U / U / <br /> U / U / U / U<br /> U / U / U / U <br /> / U / <br /> / U / <br />LYRIC<br />14 lines<br />10 syllables<br />
    37. 37. CHARACTERISTICS<br /><ul><li>a lyric poem
    38. 38. consisting of fourteen lines
    39. 39. written in iambicpentameter
    40. 40. An iamb is a metrical foot consisting ofan unaccented syllable U followed by an accented syllable / .
    41. 41. Pentameter means there are 5 iambs in the line
    42. 42. 2 syllables x 5=10 syllables</li></li></ul><li>PETRARCHAN<br />
    43. 43. Sonnet XLIIElizabeth Barrett Browning<br />How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.<br />I love thee to the depth and breadth and height<br />My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight<br />For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.<br />I love thee to the level of every day's<br />Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight.<br />I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;<br />I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.<br />A<br />B<br />B<br />A<br />A<br />B<br />B<br />A<br /><ul><li>COUNT THE NUMBER OF LINES
    44. 44. IDENTIFY THE RHYME SCHEME</li></li></ul><li>C<br />I love with a passion put to use<br />In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.<br />I love thee with a love I seemed to lose<br />With my lost saints, -- I love thee with the breath,<br />Smiles, tears, of all my life! -- and, if God choose,<br />I shall but love thee better after death<br />D<br />C<br />D<br />C<br />D<br /><ul><li>COUNT THE NUMBER OF LINES
    45. 45. IDENTIFY THE RHYME SCHEME
    46. 46. HOW ARE THE LINES DIVIDED?</li></li></ul><li>RHYME scheme<br /><ul><li>Petrarchan (Italian) rhyme scheme:
    47. 47. abba, abba, cd, cd, cd
    48. 48. abba, abba, cde, cde</li></li></ul><li>Thought structure<br /><ul><li>Octave/ sestet
    49. 49. The octave, eight lines, presents a situation or idea.
    50. 50. The sestet (sextet), six lines, responds, to the situation or idea in the octave.</li>

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