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Full Eecs Report Draft 11 05 2009

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This document is the 1.3 version of the EECS and CEEC Plan Framework for Shreveport. This version is dated 11.05.09

This document is the 1.3 version of the EECS and CEEC Plan Framework for Shreveport. This version is dated 11.05.09

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  • 1. Energy Efficiency & Conservation Strategy City of Shreveport, Louisiana Version 1.3 November 4, 2009 Gulf Geoexchange and Consulting Services, Inc. in collaboration with Morgan Hill Sutton & Mitchell Architects, LLC Purdue Center for Regional Development Consortium for Education Research & Technology and Chronicle of Numbers
  • 2. Table of Contents Energy Efficiency & Conservation Strategy # Executive Summary # Phase I Report: Energy Efficiency & Conservation Strategy Overview Goals and Objectives Alignment with EECBG Program Purposes Alignment with EECBG Program Principles Alignment with EECBG Program Desired Outcomes Proposed Implementation Plan Plan Overview EECS Actions and Strategies EECS Enabling Activities Evaluation, Monitoring, and Verification Use of Funds by Adjacent Units of Local Government Communication with the State Sustaining Program Benefits Accountability # Framework Document for Phase II: Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan Purpose Goals and Objectives Achieving Balanced Sustainability Building Local Capacity Through Strategic Doing Plan Focus Areas Plan Process Plan Participants # Appendices Appendix A – EECBG Activity Sheets Appendix B – CERT Report Appendix C – Steering Committee Members Appendix D – List of Potential/Proposed Working Group Members Appendix E – Meeting Minutes
  • 3. DRAFT Executive Summary The City of Shreveport currently has a number of opportunities and faces significant challenges with regard to energy efficiency and conservation. (examples with footnotes) local capacity in energy, natural gas industry and its unknown environmental impacts, local innovation & entrepreneurship, saving money, shifting the use of our money to achieve more positive impacts, sewer and stormwater concerns from the EPA, the potential for non-attainment status in terms of air quality following the update of EPA standards. Through the current process of completing the Shreveport Caddo Master Plan, the City has been reminded of the citizens’ desires to improve quality of life, becoming a “greener,” healthier, more sustainable community. (See the Shreveport Caddo 2030 Vision Report: www.communicationsmgr.com/ projects/1409/docs/VisionPoster-FINAL-LO.pdf ) To date, the City has pursued a series of independent initiatives to address these issues and take advantage of these assets. (footnote potential appendix) With the funds provided by the US Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency Community Block Grant (EECBG), the City has a new opportunity to advance these efforts and invest in new energy efficient innovations. Being awarded a grant for $1,977,900 from the Department of Energy, the City of Shreveport initiated a contract for the completion of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (EECS) intended to maximize the leverage of new investments and coordinate with existing energy efficiency endeavors. The City’s energy efficiency consultant, Gulf Geoexchange and Consulting Services, Inc. (GGCS) has assembled a project team with expertise to provide the full range of services needed to be successful in advancing Shreveport’s goals for energy efficiency and conservation. Tasks have been divided among and led by project team members according to their area of expertise, and each element has been coordinated and developed with the support and advisement of the collective team. The City charged the project team with completing two primary tasks: 1) an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy report (EECS: Phase I) 2) a Framework Document for the future completion of a Comprehensive Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plan. (CEECP: Phase II) The first task, the EECS report, involved the selection of projects to be funded by the City’s EECBG, requiring the integral involvement and direction of a diverse citizen-based steering committee. Through interviews with city government, and the input of the EECS Steering Committee, the project team assembled a full range of potential projects and programs eligible for the City to consider. Then the project team prepared a detailed report listing, explaining, and providing a cost/ benefit analysis of each potential project/program, so that each could be fairly compared and evaluated by the EECS Steering Committee. Benefits considered during this analysis include: • energy savings • greenhouse gas emissions reductions • additional funding to be leveraged • costs saved • jobs created/retained • long vs. short term impact (i.e. sustainability) • coordination among other EECBG funding recipients • any other tangible and intangible benefits 4
  • 4. DRAFT Projects were then selected and prioritized based on this assistance, and are reported in Phase I of this document, the EECS Report. The Phase I report covers all items required in Attachment D of the EECBG program, listing projects/programs recommended for funding, showing the dollar amounts recommended to be allocated to each project/program, and including a description of the metrics to be used to measure the success of the selected projects/programs. The second piece of work is the preparation of a CEECP Framework Document details the goals and inclusive process for the development and implementation of a CEECP. The EECS Steering Committee was also called upon to advise and assist in the preparation of this Framework Document, which is included in Phase II of this report. Committee members were introduced to ‘Strategic Doing’ and participated in a small scale version of the process proposed for the CEECP. The committee provided feedback and guidance regarding the proposed process, they identified an initial list of stakeholders to be invited to work on the CEECP, and they selected the CEECP as one of the projects/activities to be funded by the EECBG. 5
  • 5. DRAFT 6
  • 6. DRAFT Phase I Report Energy Efficiency & Conservation Strategy City of Shreveport, Louisiana Prepared by Gulf Geoexchange and Consulting Services, Inc. 7
  • 7. DRAFT 8 Phase I Report
  • 8. DRAFT 1.0 EECS Overview Located in Northwest Louisiana, Shreveport is a city of 205,000 residences in 120 sq. miles of the 4th district in Caddo Parish. The metropolitan area has a population in excess of 375,000. The Median income is $ 31,000 and per capita is$ 17,800. There are roughly 97,000 housing units in the city. We have constructed a program that we feel will give us an average reduction in energy use by our citizens of 20% and at the same time create well over 500 new and permanent jobs and as many as an additional 1000 temporary jobs over the next 3 years. We have a very ambitious schedule with critical milestones of 1,000 residential and commercial building audits in the first year and doubling each year to total 7,000 within the 36 month program. To accomplish these goals, we feel that the Best Practice is to employ the “STRATEGIC DOING” method (See Appendix __). By Strategic Doing we can accomplish more task with less people monitoring ________---(add a very short synopsis). A steering committee was set up by Shreveport’s city administrator and they met on a weekly basis with the consultant team to discuss and decide what specific activities were of most interest to the community. 2.0 Goals and Objectives Shreveport’s overall goal is to reduce total energy consumption in the city by 20% per capita, to create at least 500 permanent jobs and to have sustainable projects past the 36 month initial period. The city will incorporate audits recently performed by Johnson Controls. The results will be reviewed to determine what if any measures to take next. Cost estimates for repairs and upgrades, measurement and verification will be determined. The government audits and reviews can be completed within the first quarter 2010, and remaining actions items to be initiated no later than the second quarter of 2010. Once we have the audit program in full motion we will be in a position to evaluate the best strategy for completing more low and moderate income retrofits. We will be able to work with the State’s Weatherization Assistance Program where the average amount per unit is now $ 6,500. Shreveport will aid the city’s largest energy users in achieving their 20% reduction through best practices in energy reduction programs. These large users will be contacted to determine how the city can assist them is achieving the goals. Bring these users up to date on the current financial incentives that are available, including tax credits, low interest loans and Performance Based Energy Efficiency Contract services. A program coordinator will be responsible for audits, marketing, customer service, scheduling, permitting, inspections and integration with other recovery efforts and activities. It is presumed that the coordinator position evolves into the city’s head of a new Environment/ Energy Management Office once the EECBG program is completed. With the city operating under an EPA mandate regarding CO2 reduction this is the perfect time to create such a position. Start the campaign to advise businesses and residents as to the benefits of energy audits, the resources currently available to get the audits, and the aid that the city is putting into place to help achieve those goals. This will happen within the first quarter of 2010. Implementing the results of the audits will begin after completion of the audits, and the retrofits will continue throughout the program period and beyond with the intention of continuing this until all businesses and residents are reached. The campaign will have the following elements: Energy Efficiency & Conservation Strategy - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 9
  • 9. DRAFT • City will cost share the first $100 of an energy audit for any business or homeowners that do not already qualify for free audits. • Creating buying pools where businesses and homeowners may include audit recommendations any of the EEC measures recommended by the audits as part of the larger bid the city is assembling for its EEC measures. Businesses’ and homeowners pay for the equipment but can take advantage of any volume discounts for the equipment (only equipment will be included, each home or business will have to arrange for installation). The City will collect a fee on any equipment provided to homes or businesses in order to pay for the cost of providing service. By including the homes and businesses we will quickly create the largest possible market and generate lower prices for all measures. The result is maximizing the number of EEC projects and greater / swifter job creation. • City will rebate permit costs associated any EEC completed and inspected project. City will cost share 10% or $ 400, whichever is smaller, of any EEC measure undertaken as part of the Recovery Act. We will leverage USDA grants for small business. For any EEC measures or renewable energy systems installed and rebate the permit fees upon final inspection. • Businesses that have audits and completed measures that will result in savings of at least 10% of their annual energy will receive a window sticker/wall plaque indicating that they have participated in the city’s “Recovery Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program”. We will develop a marketing plan that encourages participation by every business in the city. Special attention will be paid to measures that promote the reliability of the energy supply such as solar electric, solar air conditioning, geoexchange, solar hot water and wind. • Every resident of the city will receive an information package that will include such items as details of the city’s efforts associated with the Recovery Act, the incentives offered by the City, the tax benefits of various RE systems and coupons for their audits. People that have audits done in a certain time period will be entered into a drawing to receive a credit of $ 5,000 on any measures taken as a result of the audit. • City will try to coordinate our efforts with other cities that are also undertaking similar work and determine if combining our purchasing efforts will result in even lower costs, further market penetration and greater job creation. The City has to adopt the energy efficiency building codes enacted by the State. This may prove to be a hurdle to accomplishing some of the audit and implementation of goals outlined. A timetable for the City to adopt the codes has not yet been determined. Additionally, advanced training for Inspectors will be required. The training will entail the most up to date EE codes and practices. We will leverage training grant from DO Labor. The training will be designed so that all inspectors will be able to participate in the Louisiana HERO program. We will begin by establishing a program to train one new employee (contractor) to become the primary EE Code inspector for existing structures. This will create a minimum of one new job for a period of at least 2 years. Projected timeframe is first or second quarter of 2010. To support this program, updated energy codes and enforcement tools and software are required for permitting for Energy Efficiency Code Enforcement. The city will need to upgrade code books, forms and other necessary improvements to incorporate the most up to date EE codes and inspections. Projected timeframe is first or second quarter of 2010. The City has opportunities to install renewable energy equipment. Once these opportunities 10 Phase I Report
  • 10. DRAFT are determined as economically feasible, renewables will be incorporated into the retrofit programs. This will be addressed with the audits performed. Projected timeframe is first or second quarter of 2010. One goal that was proposed by the steering committee was to create an energy efficiency/ sustainable incubator program. This program will create a buying cooperative and associated financing for the businesses and residences of the city and surrounding parishes to obtain conservation, efficiency measures, renewable energy equipment and systems at the lowest possible prices. It will also help in business growth and job creation. This incubator program will be further defined and put in place before the second quarter of 2010. Areas of the city do not have access to broadband, or the access is not affordable to lower income households. The city will be aggressive in implementing easy access to broadband for all of its citizens and residents. Some of this will be leveraged with the USDA broadband program. The city has numerous levels of GIS systems fragmented throughout. The goal for the GIS program is to have a central location and accessible by all systems to reduce the number of “server centers” currently functioning. This will aid in the overall reduction of energy use. The broadband process will begin in the first quarter and continue until the goal is reached, hopefully by the last quarter of 2010. Some barriers that may be encountered is the silos currently running “their” GIS programs that allow limited access to the community to get them to understand that more access to information is better for all. A Revolving Loan Fund will be established to take advantage of the ARRA funding designed to establish such a fund to promote energy efficiency and renewable energy. This fund will be coordinated with the State Energy Plan. Also, all possible methods to create financing products which allow access to conservation and renewable energy for city’s residences and businesses will be explored. Projected timeframe is first or second quarter of 2010. Transportation improvements will be addressed through the development of a Master Bike and Pedestrian plan. This plan will lead the way in producing alternative methods of transportation for our citizens. Projected timeframe is first or second quarter of 2010. Finally, we will explore reduction of GHG through an Urban Forestry Plan, Urban Agriculture Plan, and Outreach Education. Projected timeframe is first or second quarter of 2010. 2.1 Alignment with the EECBG Program Purposes We believe that all of our goals and proposed projects meet all of the standards of the EECBG Program Purposes. A target of 25% energy reduction will generate the desired reduction in emissions. More importantly it will set the stage for continued economic stability and growth for our city. If the entire city is able to save 25% on their energy costs that savings could be as high as $ 300/yr per person. That is $ 300 that is available for other needs and there is a high probability that money will be spent within the city, thus continuing to fuel our economy. Achieving these goals will also provide many new jobs in the city. All of these jobs should be permanent because they are designed to pay for themselves or are part of the private sector once they are established. 2.2 Alignment with EECBG Program Principles Our program is designed to satisfy all of the principles of the program. By using a portion of the grants monies to subsidize and perform as many energy audits as possible we will Energy Efficiency & Conservation Strategy - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 11
  • 11. DRAFT be aggressively attacking conservation and efficiency first, thus setting the stage for the renewable energy equipment that will be installed to be able to handle a higher percentage of the remaining energy needs. The commitment to put RE systems into all city buildings and create a buyers co-op for the residences and businesses of the city will create a market that will have lasting jobs and energy impacts. Completing the weatherization of all available low income housing will provide a continuing benefit through lower costs for operation and hopefully lower rents for the residences. 2.3 Alignment with EECBG Program Desired Outcomes The designation of a reachable goal of a net 20% reduction in energy consumption will insure that we have the desired outcome There will be a minimum of 10 jobs created within 30 days of grant funding and as many as 25 more in the private sector within the first year. 3.0 Proposed Implementation Plan 3.1 Plan Overview The area covered is all of Shreveport, LA., operated by it city government and it districts. (need to find out what entity will be the applicant etc and legal authorities etc.)The EECS plan will be jointly implemented by Shreveport and its various agencies in conjunction with GGCS. 3.2 EECS Actions and Strategies The first action will be to seek to leverage a large portion of any grant monies to assemble the necessary finance packages and partners to accomplish all of our goals. We believe that it is critical to take advantage of this opportunity to vault the community completely into the 21st century. In order to get our energy usage under control we need to have tools to measure, identify and act. We will work in concert with the local utilities and other interested parties to assemble a financial package that will allow every resident and business of the city to take advantage of a full range of conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energy systems. Shreveport will take the results from the energy audits on each of its buildings, which includes 22 fire stations, 3 police stations, a bus garage, more than 10 public assembly areas and sports facilities and other studies such as the ones that will be done for transportation, flex time, recycling etc and develop a matrix that will rank each suggested measure in terms of: 1. Cost effectiveness 2. Urgency 3. Job creation 4. Success Probability 5. Permanency 6. Multiplier effect We will then develop an implementation plan that will incorporate the following attributes. In addition to the measures that the city will take on its own behalf we will offer to all business and home owners of the city the following opportunities. 12 Phase I Report
  • 12. DRAFT 1. We will cost share the first $ 100 of an energy audit for any business or homeowners that do not already qualify for free audits 2. They will be allowed to include any of the EEC measures recommended by the audits, which they want to pay for, as part of the city’s bid requests. (Only equipment will be included, each home or business will have to arrange for installation) The city will collect a small fee on any equipment provided to homes or businesses in order to pay for the cost of providing service (The goal is to create the largest possible market all at once so we can generate lower prices for all measures and thus undertake far more EEC projects and have greater and swifter job creation.) 3. We will rebate permit costs associated any EEC completed and inspected (if the city agrees we need cost of permit info to factor into budgets) 4. We will cost share 10% or $ 400, whichever is smaller, of any EEC measure undertaken as part of the Recovery Act. 5. Businesses that have audits and complete at least $ 1,000 in new EEC measures will receive a window sticker/wall plaque indicating that they have participated in the county’s “Recovery Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program” We will develop a marketing plan that encourages participation by every business in the county. Special attention will be paid to measures that promote the reliability of the energy supply such as solar electric, solar air conditioning, geoexchange, solar hot water and wind. 6. The program will have a newly hired Coordinator and Assistant that will be responsible the success of the efforts. They will be the funnel for which all information and actions pass through so that we can insure that we get the most for our investments. They will be responsible for audits, marketing, customer service, scheduling, permitting, inspections and integration with other recovery efforts. This way we can continually track our cost to benefit and adjust our programs to squeeze the most out of each dollar. This position will eventually evolve into a Environmental/Energy Management Office for the city. This office will not only continue to advance energy efficiency and conservation it will be the mechanism that we use to insure efforts taken under the Recovery Act are permanent and producing the expected results. A. Every resident of the city will receive an information package that will include such items as details of the parish’s efforts associated with the Recovery Act, the incentives offered by the city, the tax benefits of various RE systems and coupons for their audits. People that have audits done in a certain time period will be entered into a drawing to receive a credit of up to 50% or $ 5,000 on any measures taken as a result of the audit. 7. We will try to coordinate our efforts with other parishes and cities that are also undertaking similar work and determine if combining our purchasing efforts will result in even lower costs, further market penetration and greater job creation. B. Energy Efficiency measures will be determined once the results of any weatherization and other conservation measures are known. The goal is to reduce the load as much as possible first then determine the proper replacement equipment. If the audits determine that similar measures are viable at multiple locations we will use common equipment to reduce our future service and maintenance issues. These measures will also be coordinated with the jobs programs. C. Renewable Energy measures will be considered for every building. In order to stimulate the RE market and take advantage of the green jobs training programs we will consolidate all of the projects into one bid package and expect to generate a large enough volume of work that we will see low enough prices to put projects on every Energy Efficiency & Conservation Strategy - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 13
  • 13. DRAFT building. We will offer bid packages for solar hot water, geoexchange systems, photo voltaic systems and solar air conditioning systems for every parish building. We will also include in the RE package all Parish businesses and residences that want to install some sort of RE equipment. We will also assemble the necessary tools to allow easy access to financing for all projects undertaken in the city. D. Transportation. All contracts for the city for any of the EEC measures will also include some form of bonus payments to any employee working on project that walks, bikes or takes public transportation. We will expect to replace all traffic lights to LED bulbs. E Waste to Energy. If the audits identify a facility that has a steady hot water need we will consider a wood waste to energy plant to produce the hot water. This plant would receive scrap wood from construction and demolition and other sources to burn in a high efficiency boiler. F. Zero Waste. We will start the process to zero energy by diverting an additional three components of the waste steam. Cooking oil, grease trap waste and food waste will be evaluated for disposal and use in either an anaerobic digester conversion to biofuels or composting. G. Development of New Models for Success. To achieve goals like reduction of waste and production of energy from within the community we will try to establish cooperative ventures for those that must use the services such as the proposed wood waste to energy or organic waste diversion. As an example for the wood waste to energy plant, those businesses that generate a lot of wood waste will become part of the cooperative as a function of obtaining their license to operate in the city. They will have to bring their wood waste to the site, pay the dumping fee that is necessary to support the site, and then when the project has amortized itself after a few years through these fees and energy sales it is anticipated that not only will there be lower rates for dumping there should be the possibility for income back to the cooperative members, including the city, from energy sales. It is also anticipated that there should be businesses outside the city that will participate. The same model will be investigated for the organic waste. The businesses that would participate in that corporative would be things such as restaurants, food processors, veterinarians, grocers and home owners. The intent here is to establish methods of achieving the desired outcomes but in a manner that is ultimately cash neutral or profitable for the city. The city needs to consider if it wants to be the lead in establishing these coops and will change their licensing requirements to move everyone where they need to be. It also focuses on having those create the problem, pay for resolving it, but due to the low price of energy now, it they make the grade at today’s prices they should be profitable as energy prices rise in the future. Perhaps the city could say that they will allow use of some of the surface area of the existing landfill for the organic activities as an enabling activity. 3.3 EECS Enabling Activities (cut out of the latest edit) For this to move forward from here some of the most obvious items that need to be addressed or known are: - would there be any support for any of the measures we are proposing? - would they adopt the 25% goal - is there any base line energy use and emissions for the city and its residents? The minimal requirement is A: A comprehensive emissions inventory for the entire community is not 14 Phase I Report
  • 14. DRAFT necessary. You need only baseline the activities that will be impacted by the activities funded by the EECBG program. You should use the start date of these activities as your baseline. - is there any form of energy audits done for the city buildings? - any estimates of current weatherization needs? - is there any handle on the scope and nature of the weatherization market beyond the low income housing? - any estimates of how many businesses would use an energy audit? - is there already a market for audits in Shreveport, and how much do they cost? - any other general energy information available? - does the city have any other financial things in place that can be used in concert with the EECBG grants to provide the leverage they require? Are there state grants that will also be in play with these funds? - If you can have the city get us some of their estimates for some of their wish list such as: - $’s to get the codes and inspection thing done along with better space - $’s to provide household hazardous waste collection - $’s upgrade computers and energy audit software - $’s for baseline energy audits for largest buildings 3.4 Evaluation, Monitoring and Verification 4.0 Use of Funds by Adjacent Units of Local Government 5.0 Communication with the State 6.0 Sustaining Program Benefits 7.0 Accountability Energy Efficiency & Conservation Strategy - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 15
  • 15. DRAFT 16
  • 16. DRAFT Framework Document for Phase II Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan City of Shreveport, Louisiana Prepared by Morgan Hill Sutton & Mitchell Architects, LLC and Purdue Center for Regional Development 17
  • 17. DRAFT Fig. 1: Balanced Sustainability Environmental Quality Economic Prosperity Unbalanced Indicators Balanced Quadruple Bottom Line Social Equity Cultural Vitality 18 Framework Document for Phase II
  • 18. DRAFT 1.0 Purpose We propose that the City of Shreveport conduct a Comprehensive Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plan (CEECP) to guide long term decision making and investment. To position the City of Shreveport as a front runner in achieving the objectives outlined in the Energy Efficiency Community Block Grant (EECBG), we must go beyond the satisfaction of minimum requirements to pursue innovation. Reaching higher will allow the City to maximize long term benefits and develop a competitive advantage when applying for future funding. The CEECP will build upon the initial investments identified during Phase I, chart the course for future investments, and develop a long term strategy for Shreveport to become more energy efficient. The CEECP will implement a process that engages citizens, allowing many people to make meaningful contributions addressing complex community issues. The process used will incubate/create new ideas and align existing resources around innovation. The results of such a process will be new businesses, increased job opportunities, and improved quality of life. 1.1 Goals and Objectives Following the work of the Phase I Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (EECS), the primary goals for the CEECP will be to provide a clear direction for achieving: • job creation • energy savings • reduction of greenhouse gases • provident use of local resources • renewable energy production • maximized leveraging of funds In addition to fulfilling these initial goals as outlined by the Department of Energy and the City of Shreveport for the Phase I EECS, the CEECP will be a: • means for the City to pursue future funding from state and federal sources • framework for regional collaboration among municipal and parish governments • process for cultivating local capacity, leadership, advocacy, and innovation 1.2 Achieving Balanced Sustainability As our community strives to improve its energy efficiency, it is important to evaluate our opportunities not only from an environmental and economic point of view, but also from a social and cultural perspective. We have the ability to make decisions that can save money, generate income, improve our environmental quality, conserve our local resources, support and enhance our local cultural and heritage resources, and have positive impacts for all citizens in the greater Shreveport region. Ultimately, the CEECP will aim to maximize benefits according to a multiple bottom line (Fig. 1): • environmental quality • economic prosperity • social equity1 • cultural vitality2 Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 19
  • 19. DRAFT Fig. 2: Strategic Planning vs. Strategic Doing Public Private Sector Sector Community Based Organizations Collaborative Initiatives Academic Institutions Funding Agencies Fig. 3: Creating Partnerships to Link & Leverage Our Assets 20 Framework Document for Phase II
  • 20. DRAFT These multiple bottom lines should provide guidance for indicators/metrics that will be used to determine preferred initiatives and evaluate progress during the implementation of these initiatives. A sustainable plan will successfully balance the indicators on this quadruple bottom line, offering a package of solutions that serves all aspects of our community. 1.3 Building Local Capacity Through Strategic Doing The CEECP will explore, uncover, develop, and support local assets that can help the City of Shreveport become more energy efficient. The plan will cultivate open networks to link and leverage these local assets through a process called ‘strategic doing.’ This new, innovative approach represents a shift from the slow process of traditional strategic planning to fast cycles of strategic doing. “Henry Mintzburg, author of The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning and the insightful article “Crafting Strategy” says, “The future is an abstraction...it never arrives.” It is always “out yonder.” Planning, according to Mintzburg, can only accomplish two objectives: it gives us an image of the future, and; allows us to make decisions about actions we take now that will impact that future when it arrives. Thinking (planning) and acting (doing) are inseparable. Formal planning -- especially that type typically labeled “strategic” (a word widely used yet seldom defined) -- can put too much distance between these two. So where can creativity, ambiguity, tension, and decisiveness come together in a healthy environment that regards the integrity of the individual and the value of the organization equally? This is accomplished only through dialogue.” 3 Strategic doing is a civic discipline to guide open innovation. It is a methodology for productive dialogue. It builds on existing assets, energy, and excitement, and empowers community members and organizations to take decisive action, becoming fully engaged in the work needed within the community. As we engage in conversations with one another our actions and strategies begin to align and we accomplish meaningful work. Without a strategy, we have individuals acting independently, often resulting in counterproductive results and fads. With strategic planning, a course of action is recommended, but often fails to result in unified actions. The process is often controlled by a handful of people, and if the process is weak, the commitment to implementation withers quickly. With strategic doing plans and action occur together allowing for frequent feedback, learning, and aligning throughout the process. (Fig. 2) Strategic doing uses an open network model. Open networks offer unique advantages and will provide the structure for progress and innovation in our modern economy. Networked processes are more fluid, adaptable, and flexible. They combine open participation and leadership direction. And, we find that as our network of partners grows, our opportunities multiply and we generate new assets and unforeseen innovation. In order for strategic doing to work, we must create trusted civic spaces, develop new leadership characteristics, and promote civility. All partners decide to exhibit characteristics and behaviors that enable productive dialogue: genuine curiosity, appreciative inquiry, transparency, joint accountability, transformative thinking, commitment to engage, participation to contribute, active listening and learning, collaboration, and mutual respect. (Fig. 3) Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 21
  • 21. DRAFT Prosperity Opportunity Zone Productivity Information & Leadership Innovation Information & Leadership Collaboration Fig. 4: Increasing Our Opportunities and Prosperity as we Build Trust and Collaboration Explore/Mine Learn/Adjust Focus/Align Commit/Act Fig. 5: The Strategic Doing Cycle 22 Framework Document for Phase II
  • 22. DRAFT Trusted relationships help us survive and thrive. They create the resiliency we need to find the opportunities and handle the shocks ahead. Trust emerges when we behave in ways that build trust and mutual respect. Relationships are key. As we work together in a trusted space, we accomplish more. We attract new partners and assets. We all grow together, exponentially. (Fig. 4) As the number of trusted relationships increases, the value of the network goes up. More opportunities arise with stronger networks. Leaders in this process guide positive conversations, delegate leadership to those doing the work, and grow others’ capacity to lead. Leadership is a shared responsibility distributed within the group. Competitive communities are those that learn how to break down the silos and link/leverage their assets quickly. Strategic doing will enable us to accomplish these goals and meet the complex challenges and deep transformation that needs to occur within our community. Collaboration leads to innovation. Innovation improves our productivity and our prosperity. (Fig. 4) Strategic Doing answers four major questions (Fig. 5): What could we do? What are our assets and how can we link/leverage to create new opportunities? Develop ideas and uncover opportunities. What should we do? What outcomes do we want most to achieve? How can we get there? Choose what to do. What will we do? What commitments are required to accomplish our outcomes? Embark on specific initiatives. Launch specific initiatives by aligning resources with “link and leverage” strategies. How will we learn? When and how will we come back together to assess our progress and revise our strategy? Execute and measure results for each initiative. Adjust as needed. This cycle of conversations is frequent, ongoing, and supports transparent accountability. Groups come together every 30-60 days. The goal is to articulate a clear direction and then to define initiatives that align with this direction. Leadership keeps people focused and the process open. Thick and trusted networks evolve that are strategic. They help us learn faster, make decisions faster, and act faster. Notes: 1 Rose, Kalima and Julie Silas. 2001. Achieving Equity through Borrup, Tom. 2006. The Creative Community Builder’s Smart Growth: Perspectives from Philanthropy. PolicyLink Handbook: How to Transform Communities Using Local and The Funders’ Network for Smart Growth and Livable Assets, Art, and Culture. St. Paul, Minnesota: Fieldstone Communities. Alliance. 2002. Promoting Regional Equity. PolicyLink and The Funders’ 3 McCann, John M. 2009. Leadership As Creativity: Finding Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities. the Opportunity Hidden Within Decision Making and Dialogue. Resources, Lessons Learned. National Endowment 2 Jackson, Maria Rosario, Florence Kabwasa-Green, and Joaquin for the Arts. http://arts.endow.gov/resources/Lessons/ Herranz. 2006. Cultural Vitality in Communities: Interpretation MCCANN2.HTML and Indicators. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute. Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 23
  • 23. DRAFT Fig. 6: EECBG Eligible Activities Source: US Department of Energy, www.eecbg.energy.gov/solutioncenter/eligibleactivities/default.html 24 Framework Document for Phase II
  • 24. DRAFT 2.0 Plan Focus Areas The CEECP will be structured around seven major focus areas that cover all of the eligible activities outlined for the EECBG. (Fig. 6) While each of these focus areas are strongly interrelated, these serve as major categories for our work during the planning process. Working groups will be formed around each of these focus areas and specific projects/ initiatives will emerge. 2.1 Building Energy Efficiency Eligible activities within the Building Energy Efficiency focus area include energy audits for commercial, residential, industrial, governmental, and non-profit buildings, financial incentive programs, building codes/inspections, and energy efficiency retrofits. 2.2 Clean and Renewable Energy Sources Eligible activities within the Clean and Renewable Energy Sources focus area include on-site renewable energy generation, energy distribution technology, and the reduction/capture of methane and other greenhouse gases. 2.3 Reduction of Waste and Pollution Eligible activities within the Clean and Renewable Energy Sources focus area include recycling programs, activities that result in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and watershed management. 2.4 Transportation and Land Use Alternatives The Transportation and Land Use Alternatives focus area covers activities related to energy conservation in transportation and patterns of land use. 2.5 Green Workforce/Business Incentives The Green Workforce/Business Incentives focus area explores economic development opportunities related to any projects above. 2.6 Energy Education/Outreach The Energy Education/Outreach focus area explores methods for transforming the way our community thinks about energy efficiency and conservation, sharing information and promoting any of the projects above 2.7 Other This focus area is for any innovations that do not fit in the other six categories. The Department of Energy has included ‘other’ as an eligible activity and encourages the innovation of energy efficiency and conservation strategies not included in the listed eligible activities. Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 25
  • 25. DRAFT Fig. 7: Managing Strategic Doing Initiatives Working Groups Core Group Fig. 8: The Pattern of the Strategic Doing Process The Core Group convenes Working Groups 30-60 days Work Meet Meet Meet Meet Work Working Groups convene Initiatives 26 Framework Document for Phase II
  • 26. DRAFT 3.0 Plan Process The process for developing the CEECP will involve seven stages: 1. Plan Initiation 2. Baseline 3. Target 4. Opportunities/Options 5. Preferred Action Plan 6. Implementation and Evaluation 7. Plan Review and Adoption ‘Strategic doing’ will guide the work during each stage of the plan’s development. Participants will organize themselves in working groups to accomplish a set of specific initiatives. (Fig. 7) They will use cycles of strategic doing to cross pollinate ideas and link/leverage assets among the various working groups. This cycle of conversations is frequent, ongoing, and supports transparent accountability. Participants leave each conversation with commitments, break off to accomplish tasks, and reconvene to report and then determine the next set of tasks. Progress on individual initiatives is regularly reported to their respective working group, and working Groups come together every 30-60 days. (Fig. 8) And web 2.0 tools provide a valuable trusted space for participants to continue conversations beyond meetings, share ideas, and to report on their work. They allow for continued collaboration, transparency and accountability. Stage 1. Plan Initiation During the first stage, the groundwork will be laid for the plan. Stakeholders will be engaged and organized. The process will be prepared and initiated. Activities Cultivate partnerships with institutions of higher education, state and neighboring local governments, as well as private sector industry and community based organizations Engage steering committee established during Phase I and adjust as needed Describe/define timeframe and jurisdictional area covered by plan Assemble working groups around each focus areas, led by members of the steering committee Teach strategic doing Initiate Web 2.0 tools to create a collaborative space for working groups Agree on goals and principles Deliverables Map of jurisdictional area covered by plan Schedule for plan process Training materials for strategic doing workshop Web 2.0 site with public interface and work space for focus area groups Presentation/report describing goals and principles Stage 2. Baseline To produce a baseline, data will be gathered and analyzed to provide a picture of our community’s current energy use and carbon footprint. And projections will be made to describe where we will be in the future if we follow a “business as usual” scenario. Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 27
  • 27. DRAFT Activities Establish indicators and metrics linked to goals/principles Collect and analyze data Establish baseline report of the data analyzed Produce forecasts and projections Deliverables GIS layers and analysis mapping for spatially relevant indicators Published presentation/report describing current indicator values, forecasts, and projections Stage 3. Target The target will provide a description of where we want to be, in terms of energy efficiency and conservation, when we reach our target date. It will define our broader desired outcomes, and allow us to understand our end goal. Activities Determine targets Seek consensus and approval for targets Deliverables Published presentation/report identifying the targets Promotional materials, public service announcements Formally adopted resolution Stage 4. Opportunities/Options During Stage 4, we will address the following questions: What could we do to improve our energy efficiency and conservation? What plans are already underway? What are other places doing? How could we be innovative? Activities Compile best practices Generate potential projects/initiatives Deliverables Published presentation/report identifying best practices for each focus area (case studies) Published presentation/report describing and analyzing initiatives Fig. 9: The CEECP Process Establish Explore Implementation Baseline Opportunities & Evaluation 1.0 Plan Set Preferred Plan Review Initiation Target Action Plan & Adoption 28 Framework Document for Phase II
  • 28. DRAFT Stage 5. Preferred Action Plan During Stage 5, We will address the following questions: What should we do? What actions are going to be most successful in achieving our goals? What actions are most leverageable, sustainable, and feasible? Activities Evaluate initiatives based on metrics, sustainability, and feasibility Select and prioritize preferred initiatives Identify funding strategies Deliverables Published presentation/report outlining the preferred initiatives with funding strategies Stage 6. Implementation and Evaluation During Stage 6, We will address the following questions: What will we do? How should we prioritize actions? What preparations need to be made to accomplish these actions? Who will do what, when, and for how much? How will we fund our work? How will we evaluate our progress? During this stage a reporting system will be created to evaluate and update the plan as needed. Who will gather data and prepare reports? Who will receive those reports? How will the plan be adjusted over time to achieve results? Activities Develop a prioritized/phased implementation strategy for each initiative Identify policies and/or administrative actions adopted or needed to support plan implementation Identify obstacles to implementation and describe strategies to remove obstacles Establish commitments for implementation Establish mechanisms for ongoing evaluation, accountability, and adaptation (reporting system) Deliverables Published implementation guidebook: the guidebook will include information about the resources and partnerships required to achieve the plan’s goals; it will detail the prioritized steps to take; it will describe who will do what, when, and how much it will cost. 1.1 1.2 Target Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 29
  • 29. DRAFT Fig. 10: The EECS and CEECP Processes EECS 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 t 3 Years Short Term CEECP version 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 T Long Term Target Progress on Initiatives provide benchmarks for achieving the Target Goal Milestones gage our progress on each Initiative Baseline Fig. 11: Evaluating Our Progress 30 Framework Document for Phase II
  • 30. DRAFT Stage 7. Plan Review and Adoption The process used during Phase I for completing and implementing the EECS is a small scale demonstration of the process proposed for Phase II the Comprehensive Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plan. Both are intended to go through a cycle of reviews to allow for amendment and improvement over time. (Fig. 10) During this stage, the initial version of the plan would be adopted, subject to change over time as needed. Ultimately, progress evaluated on each initiative will be monitored and adjusted to allow us to achieve or surpass our target goal. (Fig. 11) Activities Review preliminary and final drafts of the Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan Deliverables Preliminary and final draft of the Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 31
  • 31. DRAFT 4.0 Plan Participants Working Groups Citizens of Shreveport Building Energy E ciency Clean & Renewable Energy Sources Core Group Reduction of Waste & Pollution Government Steering Committee Transportation & Land Use Alternatives Project Team Green Workforce/Business Incentives Energy Education/Outreach Fig. 12: Plan Participants 4.1 Public The CEECP should be shaped around the vision of the Citizens of Shreveport. The plan should build upon the values identified by the Shreveport Caddo Master Plan, neighborhood and local advocacy groups, and other public forums. (See the Shreveport Caddo 2030 Vision Report: www.communicationsmgr.com/projects/1409/docs/VisionPoster-FINAL-LO.pdf ) All citizens in Shreveport will be called upon to do their part to improve our energy independence. Roles: Seek information, education, and training Voice opinions, providing guidance for all other participants Conserve energy within our own sphere Live providently within our means Explore opportunities for new business creation 4.2 Government Elected officials and department heads provide leadership, initiating and helping to shape the process to ensure the completion and implementation of the CEECP. Roles: Define the timeframe and jurisdictional area of the plan Manage the project team Adopt the plan Allocate and spend the funds, implementing the plan Evaluate progress Report on evaluations Amend the plan over time as needed 32 Framework Document for Phase II
  • 32. DRAFT 4.3 Steering Committee The steering committee formed in Phase I of the EECS will be invited to extend their involvement as stewards over the plan process and serve on each of the working groups. As jurisdictional boundaries are determined and partnerships are formed, others may be invited to join the steering committee. (See Appendix for complete list of Steering Committee members.) Roles: Oversee the plan process Guide and direct the project team Provide leadership and advocacy in working groups Recommend the plan and its initiatives to government leaders for adoption/implementation 4.4 Project Team The project team, led by Gulf Geoexchange, is currently comprised of Morgan Hill Sutton & Mitchell Architects, Consortium for Education Research and Technology (CERT), Purdue University, and Chronicle of Numbers. Roles: Inventory potential working group members/stakeholders Teach ‘strategic doing’ and provide technical assistance to the working groups Provide a web 2.0 workspace for working groups that also provides a public interface Provide expertise and analysis of best practices and case studies within the six focus areas Convene and facilitate forums every 30-60 days --meetings that gather all working groups to link and leverage, share resources, look for opportunities for collaboration/innovation, growing local capacity and expertise around energy efficiency and conservation practices Formalize the ideas generated by the working groups into a plan document Set metrics for baseline, produce target projections and provide evaluation for initiatives Structure GIS database and procedures for monitoring trends Provide a format and procedures for regular evaluation and reporting 4.5 Working Groups A series of working groups will be organizedaround each focus area concentrated on EECBG eligible activities, as outlined by the scope of work. Each working group will engage an open network of public and private sector stakeholders. (See Appendix for list of potential/ proposed Working Group members.) Roles: Determine goals and principles Set targets Publicize and promote the plan Generate potential initiatives Select preferred initiatives Develop prioritized/phased implementation strategy Identify obstacles to implementation and describe strategies to remove obstacles Review the plan Advise the project team Oversee implementation Evaluate and report progress on initiatives Comprehensive Energy Efficiency & Conservation Plan - City of Shreveport, Louisiana 33
  • 33. DRAFT 34
  • 34. DRAFT Appendices Energy Efficiency & Conservation Strategy City of Shreveport, Louisiana 35
  • 35. DRAFT 36
  • 36. DRAFT Appendix A Shreveport Program Descriptions for EECBG Activity Worksheets 1. Completion of the Comprehensive EEC Plan Proposed allocation - $150,000.00 2. Audits The city has recently had audits performed by Johnson Controls and the results will be reviewed to determine what if any measures to take next. We can then provide a description and cost estimate of repairs and upgrades that are needed to be effective and a description and cost estimate of measurement and verification methods needed. a. Residential and Commercial Building Energy Audits i. A program coordinator will be responsible for audits, marketing, customer service, scheduling, permitting, inspections and integration with other recovery efforts and activities. It is presumed that the coordinator position evolves into the city’s head of a new Environment/Energy Management Office once the EECBG program is completed. With the city operating under an EPA mandate regarding CO2 reduction this is the perfect time to create such a position. ii. We will cost share the first $100 of an energy audit for any business or homeowners that do not already qualify for free audits. iii. Businesses and homeowners may include audit recommendations any of the EEC measures recommended by the audits as part of the larger bid the city is assembling for its EEC measures. Businesses’ and homeowners pay for the equipment but can take advantage of any volume discounts for the equipment (only equipment will be included, each home or business will have to arrange for installation). The City will collect a fee on any equipment provided to homes or businesses in order to pay for the cost of providing service. 1. By including the homes and businesses in the bid process our goal is to create the largest possible market all at once so we can generate lower prices for all measures and thus undertake far more EEC projects, resulting in greater and swifter job creation. iv. We will rebate permit costs associated any EEC completed and inspected project. v. We will cost share 10% or $ 400, whichever is smaller, of any EEC measure undertaken as part of the Recovery Act. vi. Businesses that have audits and completed measures that will result in savings of at least 10% of their annual energy will receive a window sticker/ wall plaque indicating that they have participated in the city’s “Recovery Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program”. We will develop a marketing plan that encourages participation by every business in the city. Special attention will be paid to measures that promote the reliability of the energy supply such as solar electric, solar air conditioning, geoexchange, solar hot water and wind. vii. Every resident of the city will receive an information package that will include such items as details of the city’s efforts associated with the Recovery Act, the incentives offered by the City, the tax benefits of various RE systems and coupons for their audits. People that have audits done in a certain time period will be entered into a drawing to receive a credit of $ 5,000 on any measures 37
  • 37. DRAFT taken as a result of the audit. viii. We will try to coordinate our efforts with other cityes that are also undertaking similar work and determine if combining our purchasing efforts will result in even lower costs, further market penetration and greater job creation. ix. Economic Impact 1. There will be one job created by the coordinator position and with an expected expenditure of over $ 3,000,000 we should create an additional 50 during the 3 year program. Proposed allocation - $150,000.00 3. Technology and Code Upgrades a. Advanced training for Inspectors. i. Advanced training for all inspectors for the most up to date EE codes and practices. We will leverage training grant from DO Labor. ii. Training for all inspectors to be able to participate in the Louisiana HERO program. iii. Establish a program to train one new employee (contractor) to become the primary EE Code inspector for existing structures. This will create a minimum of one new job for a period of at least 2 years. b. Updated Energy codes and enforcement tools and software. i. Acquire software for permitting for Energy Efficiency Code Enforcement. ii. Upgrade code books, forms and other necessary improvements to incorporate the most up to date EE codes and inspections. c. Economic Impact i. There will be one new job created and this in turn will promote the reduction in energy consumption and waste within the city. d. City will plan to adopt the State EE building codes. Proposed allocation - $100,000.00 4. Energy Efficient Retrofits a. Govt. Plaza Retrofit (B1 sheet already complete) b. Low and Moderate Income Energy Efficiency Retrofits i. Once we have the audit program in full motion we will be in a position to evaluate the best strategy for completing more low and moderate income retrofits. We will be able to work with the State’s Weatherization Assistance Program where the average amount per unit is now $ 6,500. Proposed allocation - $200,000.00 5. Financial Incentives a. Incentives i. Audits for all businesses and residences will be eligible to receive a $100 cost share and for measures taken, support up to $ 400. We will leverage USDA grants for small business. For any EEC measures or renewable energy systems installed we will rebate the permit fees upon final inspection. b. Revolving Loan Fund i. We will take advantage of the ARRA funds that are available for establishing a revolving loan fund for energy efficiency and renewable. We will coordinate this with the State Energy Plan. c. Alternative Financing Strategies i. We will look at all possible methods to create the financing products to allow access to conservation and renewable energy for all of the city’s residences and businesses. We will this with the State Energy Plan. 38 Proposed allocation - $600,000.00
  • 38. DRAFT d. EEC Incubator Program i. Working in conjunction with the city, our utility, and CERT, we will establish an incubator to foster new businesses involved in energy conservation, efficiency and renewable energy. This will be a place where businesses will be offered cost effective rent, guidance and consult ting services, and networking opportunities. Proposed allocation - $177,900.00 6. Transportation a. Bike and Pedestrian Master Plan i. Development of a Bike and Pedestrian Master Plan will lead the way in producing as many alternative methods of transportation for our citizens as possible. Proposed allocation - $200,000.00 7. Reduction of GHG a. Urban Forestry Plan b. Urban Agriculture Plan c. Outreach Education Proposed allocation - $200,000.00 250,000.00 already used for EECS. 39
  • 39. DRAFT 40
  • 40. DRAFT Appendix B CERT Report – Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy The Consortium for Education, Research & Technology (CERT) has been retained by Gulf Geoexchange and Consulting Services, Inc. in partnership with the City of Shreveport and serves on the Project Team in three key roles to support the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (EECS): • Identify and align the combined resources of 12 higher education member institutions across North Louisiana to focus on research and development, workforce development and K-12/community outreach; • Serve a “link and leverage” role to others across existing silos—education, government, nonprofits, businesses, funding sources and others—who can help with the process (e.g. baseline, reporting, GIS); and • Help inform the work group, creating common knowledge base (e.g., best practices, analyses) to explore new educational models to use in the process. As part of the Project Team, CERT will help manage the networks, identify funding and track initiatives. Higher education resources. CERT Chancellors/Presidents (or their designees) for the past year have committed to learning the Strategic Doing process and to aligning their resources on multiple, innovative initiatives or projects. CERT has surveyed member institutions to identify current “energy systems” research projects, grants, and members of college faculties who have expertise and new technologies to contribute in one or more of the six EECS focus areas: • Building Energy Efficiency • Clean and Renewable Energy Sources • Reduction of Waste and Pollution • Transportation and Land Use Alternatives • Green Workforce/ Business Incentives • Energy Education/ Outreach Database. CERT is constructing a database of both academic and research and development resources of the 12 member institutions across the region. Examples include a Louisiana Tech University research project, “Nanoparticle Incorporated Heterogeneous Catalyst System for Biodiesel Production” and an LSU-Shreveport Institute of Human Services & Public Policy that can assist the Project Team in designing metrics and indicators. “Green Jobs” framework. CERT will convene a work group of higher education and k-12 educators to develop a plan framework for green jobs. CERT surveyed the U.S. Department of Labor February 2009 report, “Greening of the World of Work: Implications for O*NET-SOC and New and Emerging Occupations.” DOL urges moving beyond simply applying a broad label such as “green jobs,” to identify the “greening of occupations” in three categories, and project increased demand: • Green increased demand occupations—an increase in the employment demand for an existing occupations • Green enhanced skills occupations—a significant change to the work and worker requirements of an existing occupation; i.e., tasks, skills, knowledge and credentials 41
  • 41. DRAFT have been altered, and • Green new and emerging (N&E) occupations—impact is sufficient to create the need for unique work and worker requirements; the new occupation could be entirely novel or “born” from an existing occupation. Through a multi-stage research and screening process that included a review of existing literature, identification and compiling of job titles, review and sorting of job titles, and clustering of job titles into 12 sector occupational sectors, the National Center for O*NET Development identified 64 “green increased demand,” 60 “green enhanced skills,” and 91 “new and emerging occupations.” The following matrix, excerpted from “A Green Growing Economy: Opportunities of Tomorrow,” by Juliet P. Scarpa (May 13, 2009), shows the potential for green jobs across sectors: Industry Sector Definition Requirements Sample Occupations Green Building/ The design and Manufacturing building Green architects; HVAC Sustainable/ Integrated construction of materials; planning, workers; Carpenters; Design environmentally design and construction Plumbers; Welders; Traditional Industry sustainable and energy Electricians; Sheet-metal Sectors; Manufacturing; efficient buildings workers; Cement masons; Construction; Utilities Skilled machine operators Energy Efficiency The retrofitting of existing Auditing energy use Electricians; Technicians; Traditional Industry building infrastructure in existing buildings; Insulation workers; Sectors: Manufacturing; using healthy and Manufacturing materials Equipment and Construction; Utilities more resource-efficient and devices; Installing installation specialist models of construction, efficient lighting and (solar panel installation); renovation, operation, heating systems; Home weatherizing; maintenance, and Installing insulation, Energy Auditors demolition. windows and appliances; Production of appropriate technologies (fluorescent lights, water filtration systems, permeable concretes, solar panels, etc.); Maintenance & operation Renewable Energy The use of natural Manufacturing parts; Solar panel installer; (Solar/PV, Wind Energy, resources (other than Assembly & Installation Steelworkers Geothermal, Hydro/ Biomass) for energy of solar panels/ finished Marine) which are naturally heating systems; Traditional Industry replinishable Constructing wind Sectors: Utilities farms; Operating and maintaining wind turbines; repairing systems; Marketing and selling systems to consumers Recycling/ Waste The collection, treatment, Composting; Materials Recycling technician; Management/ Removal and disposal or reuse of reuse and recycling; Waste treatment Traditional Industry waste materials Pollution Control; operators; Sustainability Sectors: Manufacturing; Water Conservation & coordinator; Bio-mimicry Utilities; Technology treatment; Components, engineer; Environmental Manufacturing Science and protection & Distribution/ technician Enabling Technology; Environmental Consulting, Protection & Remediation 42
  • 42. DRAFT Industry Sector Definition Requirements Sample Occupations Smart Grid/ Smart Energy Auto-balancing, self- Manufacturing & Field and control Traditional Industry monitoring power grid Installation, Distributing engineers; Sectors: Manufacturing; that accepts any source and marketing products Communication protocol Utilities of fuel and transforms it program manager; into a consumer’s optimal Managing consultant renewable energy usage with minimal human intervention Biomass/ Biofuels/ Fuel creation from Growing and harvesting Process technicians in Biosynergy/ Ethanol/ chemical/ biological crops for feedstock, biodiesel or ethanol Fuel Cells/ Hydrogen materials other than fossil collecting waste oils for companies Traditional Industry- fuels feedstock, manufacturing sectors; Manufacturing; parts for production Construction; Agriculture; facilities; construction, transportation maintenance and operation of production facilities Vehicle Electrification/ A ground vehicle Public Transportation, Research and Alternative Transportation propelled by a motor Bicycle repair & bike Development jobs; Traditional Industry powered by electrical delivery services, Transit Technology design Sectors: Transportation energy from rechargeable line construction, jobs; Hybrid & Biodiesel batteries or other source Emissions broker, vehicle conversion & onboard the vehicle or Engine component repair jobs; Maintenance from and external source manufacturing jobs; Automotive in, on, or above the service technicians and roadway mechanics Sustainable Agriculture/ An integrated system Production, Marketing, Sustainable/ organic Green Space of plant and animal Processing, Consumption farming; Local Food Traditional Industry production practices production/ systems; Sectors: Agriculture that are efficient and Forestry – sustainable sustainable forestry worker; Urban agriculture; Land use planning; Sustainable landscaping Green Jobs in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (EECS) Focus Areas CERT will work with the EECS work group on Green Workforce/ Business Incentives to engage an open network of public and private sector stakeholders (e.g. North Louisiana Economic Partnership, Workforce Investment Board representatives, energy-related employer representatives) to identify occupations in the four focus areas that are expected to show a) increased demand, b) enhanced skills, or c) new and emerging occupations. The work group will develop a Matrix naming green occupations needed for the focus areas, sorted by categories—increased demand, enhanced skills, or new and expanded (N&E)—citing labor demand information, listing available training programs, and identifying curricula that need to be developed with employer input. 43
  • 43. DRAFT EECS Focus Area Potential “Green Jobs” Growth Building Energy Efficiency Green architects Sheet-metal workers Represents both the design and construction of HVAC workers Cement masons environmentally sustainable and energy efficient Carpenters Skilled machine operators buildings as well as the retrofitting of existing building Plumbers Insulation workers infrastructure Welders Home weatherizing Electricians Energy auditors Clean & Renewable Energy Sources Solar panel installer Onsite renewable energy generation; energy distribu- Field and control engineers tion technology; and reduction/ capture of methane Communication protocol program manager and other greenhouse gases Reduction of Waste & Pollution Recycling technician Recycling programs; reduction of greenhouse gas Waste treatment operators emissions; and watershed management Sustainability coordinator Environmental science & protection technician Transportation & Land Use Alternatives Research & development jobs Energy conservation in transportation; sustainable Technology design jobs agriculture and green space CNG and electrical conversion and repair jobs Automotive technicians and mechanics Organic farming Land use planning Local food production Sustainable landscaping Urban agriculture Forestry worker Implications for EECS Work Group on sixth Focus Area, Energy Education/ Outreach The “Green Jobs” work group will summarize process and research, with recommendations for the EECS Steering Committee. The work group, spanning K-12, community colleges and universities, will identify “career pathways” or “career lattices” that offer opportunities for citizens to pursue ascending levels of education and certifications. The green revolution can bring both environmental and social change by providing green jobs that are family- supporting to people without high levels of education, provided they seek additional training. Historically, community colleges have moved the working poor to middle-skills jobs with sustaining wages; Bossier Parish Community College, Louisiana Technical College, and Southern University at Shreveport address that need. Potential funding opportunities. CERT has developed a summary sheet and is researching federal and other funding opportunities that EECS can leverage for identified energy efficiency and conservation projects. Of the funding opportunities reviewed, fewer than one-third require cost sharing, though all programs award points for leveraging other grants and private sector partners, for example, a Retrofit Ramp-up program rewards partnering with banks, local utilities, appliance retailers, and construction firms. Funding agencies and programs include Housing & Urban Development, Department of Commerce, Department of Energy, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Agriculture, Department of Homeland Security, National Science Foundation, Department of the Interior, Department of Education, and Department of Transportation. Building energy audits, tax credits, and weatherization, particularly for low-income, are encouraged, and innovation is rewarded across a wide variety of market sectors. (See samples in the Appendix.) Public/ private partnerships. CERT will identify and align strategic partners to support EECS working groups. For example, CERT currently works with Community Renewal 44
  • 44. DRAFT International (CRI) in connecting Louisiana higher education to companies like Storer Equipment, Trane, Hubbell Building Automation and CISCO to deploy new energy conserving technologies for the design and construction of the national Center for Community Renewal. Energy education/ outreach. Although CERT will be convening higher education and K-12 for collaborative efforts around green workforce and curricula, the EECS Steering Committee stipulates that every project selected and funded should incorporate strategies and funds for marketing energy education to citizens. One member states, “Build policies that encourage us to think of ourselves as energy producers and consumers, energy entrepreneurs.” CERT will not only work with member institutions’ science-based programs, but also reach out to the Liberal Arts community at the institutions as experts increasing social accountability and promoting citizenship (e.g. Oikos Scholars Program at Oklahoma City University and LaGrange University). Another member urged creating energy-related projects that serve neighborhoods and diversion programs for unemployed, underemployed, prison labor and at-risk youth. Committee members agreed on the importance of improving citizens’ knowledge of the natural environment and climate change, as well establishing a process for informing citizens on a regular basis about environmental issues. CERT was asked to serve as the “key hub for collaboration” around projects that educate citizens about energy. For example, CERT is partnering with EnCana Energy, Bossier Parish Community College and Southern University at Shreveport to conduct four, one-week Energy Venture Camps in summer 2010 for Bossier and Caddo 14- and 15-year olds. Some members of the EECS Steering Committee and Project Team also serve on the Shreveport/ Caddo Master Plan work groups, and will seek to build on the values identified by Shreveport citizens. CERT will identify portions of the Master Plan that contribute to EECS initiatives to improve Shreveport’s energy independence. 45
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  • 46. DRAFT Appendix C Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy UTILITIES Steering Committee Members Mr. Joe B. Pierce, Jr. NEIGHBORHOODS 1040 Delaware Street Shreveport, Louisiana 71106 Mr. Lee A. Jeter, Sr. 865-4164 Executive Director Cell: 518-5894 Fuller Center for Housing of Northwest Louisiana jpiercejr@comcast.net 1512 Clay Street Shreveport, Louisiana 71101 221-7474 BUSINESS/INDUSTRY Fax: 221-7437 Cell: 230-5678 Mr. Roy Griggs ljeter@fullercenternwla.org Griggs Enterprises 330 Marshall Street Ms. Leia Lewis Shreveport, Louisiana 71101 Sankofa Vision, Inc. 424-9748 1651 Tulane Street Cell: 347-3306 Shreveport, Louisiana 71103 Roy.griggs@partners.mcd.com 230-2892 lajordanlewis@yahoo.com ENVIRONMENTAL/CONSERVATION ADVOCATE ACADEMIA Mr. Jeff Wellborn Seaber Corporation Dr. Jeanne Hamming P. O. Box 1801 Associate Professor of English Shreveport, Louisiana 71166-1801 Centenary College of Louisiana 820-7460 2911 Centenary Blvd. jwellborn@seaber.com Shreveport, Louisiana 71104-3335 869-5082 Cell: 426-0338 TRANSPORTATION/HEALTH & FITNESS jhamming@centenary.edu Mr. Ian Webb River City Cycling & Fitness ENERGY EFFICIENCY 3787 Youree Drive Shreveport, Louisiana 71105 Mr. Gregory L. Coates 629-2453 Storer Equipment Company, Inc. ian@rivercitycycling.com 504 W. 67th Street Shreveport, Louisiana 71106 Office (318) 861-8489 STUDENT Cell (318) 455-1999 gcoates@trane.com Mr. Stuart Crichton 120 E. Wilkinson Street Shreveport, Louisiana 71104 393-3637 stuartchrichton@gmail.com 47
  • 47. DRAFT 48
  • 48. DRAFT Appendix D Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy Potential/Proposed Stakeholder List for Working Groups Building Energy & Efficiency Name Organization/Interest Pat Murphy Facilities Manager, Biomedical Research Foundation Don Bloxom Facilities Manager, LSUS Bill McConathy Facilities Manager, BPCC Gregg LeRoy Optimum Energy David Young Siemens Building Technology John Hubbard AEP SWEPCO Bill Robertson Public Service Commission Building Office Managers Association Bonnie Moore Director, Community Development Valerie Ervin Community Development American Society of Mechanical Engineers American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Condition- ing Engineers Associated General Contractors Fuller Center for Housing Mike McSwain American Institute of Architects Dr. Ravish Patwardhan Neurosurgery, Willis-Knighton Kurt Foreman North Louisiana Economic Partnership Linda Biernacki Fire Tech Systems Neighborhood Associations Student Eric Barkley CenterPoint Energy Trane/Storer Home Builders Association Shreveport Housing Authority Stanton Dossett Red River Properties Brian Bailey T&L Commercial Ann Fumarolo Sci-Port Dr. Gerald Dawkins Caddo Parish School Board 49
  • 49. DRAFT Clean & Renewable Energy Sources Name Organization/Interest Bill Ballard VP Finance, Centenary Tom Meehan SMG/Shreveport Convention Center Tim Wilhite Wilhite Solar Solutions Eric Barkley CenterPoint Energy John Hubbard AEP SWEPCO Bill Robertson Public Service Commission Kevin McCotter (NGV projects, other natural gas applications) Chesapeake Energy John Beaird Beaird Industries Raymond Hill Thermo-Technics Petrohawk Neighborhood Associations Dr. David Bieler Centenary, Hydropower, Hydrothermal Energy Generator Dr. Juan Rodriguez Centenary Dr. James Palmer Louisiana Tech Bossier CNG Student Reduction of Waste & Pollution Name Organization/Interest Charles (Andy) Goldthwaite NIH Science Writer Matthew Wallace Centenary SGA Rebecca Prosino Sci-Port Brian Bailey T&L Commercial Keith McKlung Caddo Parish Don Horton Pay Roll Co, Cleaning Co, etc. Skip Simonton Local Food Kitchen Land Fill Trees - COS/Parish Neighborhood Associations Reggie Adams Attorney Lynn Braggs Pratt Industries Shreveport Green BOMA Jerome Nicholas Landscape Architect Jon Soul ABS Ali Mustapha City of Shreveport Stormwater/Drainage Wes Wyche City of Shreveport Student 50
  • 50. DRAFT Transportation & Land Use Alternatives Name Organization/Interest Loren Demerath ABetterShreveport.org Jon Soul Montessori School Dr. John Davenport Centenary, GIS Kevin McCotter (NGV projects, other natural gas applications) Chesapeake Energy Grace Peterson LSU Ag Center Shreveport Bicycle Club LOCO Mountain Bike Club Red River Runners Sunrise Triathlon Club Art Walker Communicaton One Gene Eddy SporTran City of Shreveport (traffic engineering) Tim Wachtel SPAR Woody Wilson Caddo Parish Charles Kirkland Director, MPC Bonnie Moore Director, Community Development Sierra Club Kent Rogers Director, NLCOG Dick Bremer Chamber of Commerce Dr. Gerald Dawkins Caddo Parish School Board Michael D. Lott Re River Land Services LLC David Nelson Architect Board of Realtors Stanton Dossett Red River Properties Dianne Loridans Community Renewal Neighborhood Associations Shreveport Green Shreveport Historical Preservation Student 51
  • 51. DRAFT Green Workforce/Business Incentives Name Organization/Interest Bill Ballard VP Finance, Centenary Kurt Foreman Northwest Louisiana Economic Development Foundation Greater Shreveport Chamber Christopher Martin School of Business, Centenary Zeke Aull Facilities & Public Safety, Centenary Murray Viser Barksdale Forward John Broussard United Steelworkers Helen Sikes Accounting & Finance, Centenary Elizabeth Everett Career Services, Centenary Kempten Schwab VP, Praeses AGC contact Neighborhood Associations Harold Turner Red River Bank Zazell Dudley Shreveport Black Chamber of Commerce Angie White Northwest Louisiana Economic Development Foundation Dr. Mary Barrett Energy Business Center, Centenary Student Energy Education/Outreach Name Organization/Interest Charles (Andy) Goldthwaite NIH Science Writer Jon Soul Montessori School Sara Hebert Graphic Designer, Williams Creative Rebecca Prosino Sci-Port David Rowe Centenary Zeke Aull Facilities & Public Safety, Centenary Malari Coburn Centenary Environmental Association Dr. John Davenport Centenary, GIS Troy Messina Physics & Engineering, Centenary Chris Jay Robinson Film Center Dianne Loridans Community Renewal Greg Van Hoosier Carey New Media, Centenary Pam Atchison Executive Director, SRAC Pat Viser PR, Williams Creative Blair Knicely Marketer, Praeses Michael Laffey Media, Centenary Michelle Glaros Media, Centenary Lynn Bryan Community Renewal Paul Reuben Robinson Film Center Dr. Gerald Dawkins Caddo Parish School Board Student Shreveport Green AEP SWEPCO CenterPoint Neighborhood Associations 52
  • 52. DRAFT Other Name Organization/Interest Frances Kelley Hannah Moore Jonathan McCartney Michael Jarbo Michael Long Riley Adams Stafford Johnson Susan Garner Thadeus Pardue Zach Moffett AJ Haynes Amanda Thoma Caldwell Butler John Ramsay David Otto Stephanie Lynch Chloe Haygood Dr. Raymond Hicks Ora Hart Angela Randall Charlene Tollett Saladin El-Amin Jameelah El-Amin Angelique Feaster Julie Bass Min. J. Kojo Livingston Katrina Boden Lola Kendrick Dr. J. Orban Yolanda Gilyard Janice Sneed Milton Lewis Leroy Lewis, Jr. Nannie J. Lewis Katrina Henderson Juanita Thomas Mawiyah Bomani Nadir Bomani Chappelle Henderson 53
  • 53. DRAFT 54
  • 54. DRAFT Appendix E ENERGY EFFICIENCY & CONSERVATION STRATEGY MEETING MINUTES MHSM # 0907.00 October 1, 2009 Steering Committee: • Lee Jeter Sr. ljeter@fullercenternwla.org • Jeanne Hamming jhamming@centenary.edu • Greg Coates gcoates@trane.com • Jeff Welborn jwellborn@seaber.com • Joe Pierce Jr. jpiercejr@comcast.net • Ian Webb ian@rivercitycycling.com • Stuart Crichton stuartcrichton8@gmail.com • Leia Lewis lajordanlewis@yahoo.com Committee Member Absent: • Roy Griggs roy.griggs@partners.mcd.com Other Attendees: • Mike Strong mike.strong@shreveportla.gov • Wes Wyche wes.wyche@shreveportla.gov • Tim Wachtel timothy.wachtel@shreveportla.gov • Murray Lloyd murrayll@bellsouth.net • Kim Mitchell kmitchell@mhsmarchitects.com • Bruce Hoffman bruce@gulfgeoexchange.com • Sharon Swanson sswanson@mhsmarchitects.com • Caroline Majors cmajors@mhsmarchitects.com • Richard Lane richard@gulfgeoexchange.com • Gala Daftary gala@gulfgeoexchange.com • Mike Strong began the meeting by welcoming the committee members and thanking them for volunteering to serve. Each attendee introduced him/herself and provided a little background on themselves. • Wes Wyche discussed the committee’s scope of work and a copy was included in the handout. • Lee Jeter asked about leveraging between the city and parish. Bruce confirmed that this will occur. Lee Jeter asked about what other local awardees were doing and what kind of interaction Shreveport and this committee might have with them. Bruce noted that cooperation and idea exchange among EECBG awardees in a region (and beyond) are encouraged by the DOE. 55