Internet research tutorial
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  • 1. Research TutorialFall 2012
  • 2. Course Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to1.  Recognize and identify major artifacts and monuments of the ancient world by period and title (and artist if known)2.  Describe, analyze, and compare major works of art from the ancient world using art historical methods such as iconographic analysis and formal analysis3.  Explain the relationship between works of art and the social, political, and religious context in which they were made4.  Draw connections between works of art from different cultures and time periods5.  Use online and library resources to locate and evaluate information relevant to the study of art history
  • 3. Research Sources •  Books •  Journal Articles •  Internet
  • 4. BooksResearch Sources
  • 5. EnterSearchTerm
  • 6. Articles
  • 7. Page Scan
  • 8. PDF
  • 9. PDF
  • 10. The University of Chicago Press International Center of Medieval Art http://www.jstor.org/stable/767148 .Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp.JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.. The University of Chicago Press and International Center of Medieval Art are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Gesta.http://www.jstor.org This content downloaded by the authorized user from 192.168.52.77 on Sun, 25 Nov 2012 08:38:37 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
  • 11. Reading Romanesque Sculpture: The Iconography and Reception of the South Portal Sculpture at Santiago de Compostela* KAREN ROSE MATHEWS University of Colorado at Denver Abstract jijxxxxx::?5:?: .......... ........... Although recent scholarship and reception theory have ............ demonstratedthe importanceof audience in the actualization .......... ....................... ....... .. .... ..... .. ... xxx? ............... ........ .. ....... ..... ..... .. of meaning in images and texts, more concerted attention is .... x......... ........ .... W..... .............. necessary to understandthepolyvalent iconographic readings of Romanesquesculpture. Imagery on the south portal of the .......... ............. .. ....... cathedral of Santiago conveyed messages of ecclesiastical authority to specific audiences, namely the cathedral chapter and inhabitantsof the town. The unseverablelink between the ...... ....... cathedral of Santiago and pilgrimage, however, has caused X. .... . . . . ................... va pz. scholars to overlook the importanceof the local population as Xg. ....... ... an audience for the cult of St. James and the art patronage program of the cathedrals bishop, Diego Gelmirez (1100- . . ? .. Al eo 1140). Thispaper will explore the reception of the iconogra- ? phy of the cathedralssouthportal by various audiences in the twelfth century. The cathedral canons and townspeople may have respondedto the imagery in a manner diametrically op- . . . .. . "WI O XW 40 posed to the prescribed reading of this sculptural ensemble commissionedby the bishop. Theaudiencesmultiplereadings, mis-readings, and non-readings of the south portal imagery low , .. . . . 0 .. demonstratethe indeterminacyinherent in the iconographyof Romanesquesculptureand highlight the importanceof the di- alectical relationship betweenproduction and reception to its understanding. For centuries Santiago de Compostela has been famedfor its connection to pilgrimage1 (Fig. 1). The Liber SanctiIacobi or Codex Calixtinus, the medieval text centered on thecult of St. James and the pilgrimage to his church,depicts the NP -?Mw/" 14, gg??pilgrims visiting Santiago as a devout, enthusiastic, and thor- " W3 el ............. ON .. .............. ..oughly satisfied audience for the cult. Recent studies, how-ever, have begun to analyze the central role played by othersocial groups in the orchestrationof Jamesscult in Santiago Mag ...... 3, WAR ... ....and the benefits which these other audiences hoped to derive . ....... ...from the booming economic enterprise of the medieval cultof saints.2 FIGURE Santiago Compostela, 1. de exterior cathedral, viewof west facade Unlike the visiting pilgrims, the local population, par- author). (photo:ticularly the townspeople and the cathedral canons, wereambivalentabout the pilgrimage industry generatedin Santi- nity of his cathedral,andto presentSantiagoas a centerof pietyago by their ambitiousbishop, Diego Gelmirez (1100-1140). and pilgrimage equal to Rome.3The canons and townspeopleGelmirezcombined the constructionof a massive new cathe- of Santiago were at best reluctantparticipantsin this grandi-dral, the acquisition of ecclesiastical honors for himself and ose plan, and at worst Gelmirezsmost trenchantopponents.4his church, and the implementation of religious reform to This paper will address the local inhabitantsresponsesincrease the flow of pilgrims, to enhance the status and dig- to the central artistic enterprise undertakenby Gelmirez inGESTAXXXIX/1 @ The InternationalCenter of Medieval Art 2000 3 This content downloaded by the authorized user from 192.168.52.77 on Sun, 25 Nov 2012 08:38:37 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
  • 12. AdvancedSearch
  • 13. AdvancedSearch
  • 14. Searchspecifictitle
  • 15. !"#$%&$!()*+(#$#,$-+.*+/01$ 2011$3&%3$ !"#*)1+$!(0145*5$$607+$888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888$$!"#*)1+$9*#0#*,(:$9*#+$#;+$0"#*)1+$4,<$"+0.$<5*(=$),""+)#$)*#0#*,($>,"70#$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$!"#*)1+$?<770"4:$@"*+>14$5<770"*A+$#;+$0"#*)1+B$*($4,<"$,C($C,".5$D*E+E$.,$(,#$5*7F14$F0"0F;"05+GE$$H;0#$*5$#;+$0<#;,"5$#;+5*5I0"=<7+(#B$0(.$C;0#$J*(.$,>$+/*.+()+$*5$<5+.$#,$5<FF,"#$#;+$0"=<7+(#$$
  • 16. Search Engines •  Search engines are used to locate information on the internet
  • 17. Keyword Search •  Begin your search by choosing a “keyword”
  • 18. Keyword: Giotto
  • 19. Search term is too broad
  • 20. •  Narrow your search by using more specific keyword terms   Giotto di Bondone   Giotto Madonna   Giotto Arena Chapel
  • 21. Limit your search to images using Google’simage feature
  • 22. Click on Search Tools and select “Large” forhigh resolution images
  • 23. Evaluating Web Resources •  Much of the information available on the internet is not reliable •  You must therefore evaluate your resources to determine their validity
  • 24. Criteria WCC Librarians recommend 5 simple criteria: 1.  Authority 2.  Accuracy 3.  Coverage 4.  Objectivity 5.  Currency
  • 25. Authority Authority: •  Is the author or sponsor a reliable source?
  • 26. Authority •  Since anybody can post on the internet you must be sure that your source is credible
  • 27. Authority •  This is why Wikipedia is not considered a reliable resource
  • 28. Authority •  But Wikipedia can be a great jumping off point!
  • 29. Authority •  Look for sites sponsored by recognized experts in the field
  • 30. Authority •  Beware of sites that appear to be authored by experts
  • 31. Authority •  The authors are not always experts on the topic
  • 32. Authority •  Look for sites that are sponsored by recognized institutions such as:   Libraries   Museums   Universities   Reputable arts organizations
  • 33. Authority •  Domain names can help you identify credible sources at a glance
  • 34. Authority •  Museums and libraries are identified by the “.org” tag in their URL
  • 35. Authority •  Museum sites are an excellent source of scholarly material
  • 36. Authority •  Artcyclopedia provides links to museum object pages
  • 37. Authority •  Commercial sites are identified by the “.com” domain name: http://www.artble.com/artists/ giotto_di_bondone
  • 38. Authority •  Be wary of .com sites!
  • 39. Authority •  Be wary of sites with distracting advertising!
  • 40. Authority •  Be wary of blogs!
  • 41. Authority •  If you can’t find the author, do not trust the site
  • 42. Coverage •  Coverage refers to the quality and depth of content •  If its geared towards kids, it may not be sophisticated enough
  • 43. Accuracy •  Is the information accurate? •  Are there mistakes in facts, spelling, or the use of vocabulary?
  • 44. Quality of Design •  Blaring colors, confusing layouts, and poor design should be a warning sign that the site is not reputable
  • 45. Objectivity •  Is the information presented objectively, or does it promote an opinion or point of view?
  • 46. Currency •  Currency refers to whether a website is current or up to date
  • 47. Recommended Sources •  Metropolitan Museum Heilbrunn Timeline of Art Historyhttp://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/iptg/hd_iptg.htm
  • 48. Recommended Sources •  Artcyclopedia links to other museum resourceshttp://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/giotto_di_bondone.html
  • 49. Recommended Sources •  Smarthistoryhttp://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/st.-francis-of-assisi-receiving-the-stigmata.html
  • 50. http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/g/giotto/index.html
  • 51. Citation Format •  Citing internet sources is a pain in the neck -- but everybody has to do it! •  Otherwise, you will be guilty of plagiarism!
  • 52. Citation Format Required information includes:   Author or agency   Title of article   Site name or original source   Date created and publisher   Date of access   URL
  • 53. Citation Format Required information includes:Melissa Hall, “Gothic Art,” Art 108 Ancient to   Author or agencyMedieval, Fall 2012 (November 26, 2012)http://wccart108.wordpress.com/lectures/   Title of articleweek-14-15-romanesque-and-gothic/gothic-   Site name or original sourceart/   Date created and publisher   Date of access   URL
  • 54. Citation Format •  There are now “citation machines” available on the web that will do the formatting for youhttp://citationmachine.net/
  • 55. Citation Format •  Choose the format and type of source you are usinghttp://citationmachine.net/
  • 56. Citation Format •  If you can’t find the information you need then you might want to question the reliability of your sitehttp://citationmachine.net/
  • 57. Citation Format •  Many museum sites now offer information about how to cite their pages
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  • 59. Where to Go for Help
  • 60. Where to Go for Help