2.2 abex new3

1,222 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,222
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
252
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

2.2 abex new3

  1. 1. Barne&  Newman  (1905-­‐1970)  Barne&  Newman’s  approach  to  pain3ng  was  deeply  intellectual   Irving  Penn,  Barne&  Newman,  1966  
  2. 2. Barne&  Newman   (1905-­‐1970)  “We  are  reasser3ng  man’s  natural  desire  for  the  exalted,  for  a  concern  with  our  rela3onship  to  the  absolute  emo3ons”  Barne&  Newman   Image  source:    h&p://theoldmistressesandme.wordpress.com/  
  3. 3. Barne&  Newman   (1905-­‐1970)  “Whatever  is  fi&ed  in  any  sort  to  excite  the  ideas  of  pain  and  danger,  that  is  to  say,  whatever  is  in  any  sort  terrible,  or  is  conversant  about  terrible  objects,  or  operates  in  a  manner  analogous  to  terror,  is  a  source  of  the  sublime;  that,  is,  it  is  produc3ve  of  the  strongest  emo3on  which  the  mind  is  capable  of  feeling.  I  say  the  ,strongest  emo3on,  because  I  am  sa3sfied  the  ideas  of  pain  are  much  more  powerful  than  those  which  enter  on  the  part  of  pleasure.”  Edmund  Burke,  A  Philosophical  Inquiry  into  the  Origins  of  our  ideas  of  the  Sublime  and  BeauDful,  1756   Caspar  David  Friedrich,  The  Wanderer  Above  the  Sea  of  Fog,  1818,   Kunsthalle  Hamburg  
  4. 4. Barne&  Newman  (1905-­‐1970)  The  Beau3ful  =  pleasure  The  Sublime  =  an  encounter  with  the  “infinite”  that  reminds  of  our  insignificance  and  mortality   Barne&  Newman,  Pagan  Void,  1946   Philadelphia  Museum  of  Art  
  5. 5. Barne&  Newman   (1905-­‐1970)   Breakthrough  came  with   Onement  I  –  painted  on  his   birthday  1948  “  .  .  .  .  I  painted  it  on  my  birthday  (January  29)  in  1948.  Its  a  small  red  pain3ng,  and  I  put  a  piece  of  tape  in  the  middle,  and  I  put  my  so-­‐called  zip.”  Allen  Memorial  Museum   Barne&  Newman,  Onement  I,  1948   Museum  of  Modern  Art  
  6. 6. Barne&  Newman   (1905-­‐1970)   Newman  likened  the  canvas  to  the   primordial  void  “"[I]t  can  be  said  that  the  ar3st  like  a  true  creator  is  delving  into  chaos.  It  is  precisely  this  that  makes  him  an  ar3st,  for  the  Creator  in  crea3ng  the  world  began  with  the  same  material-­‐-­‐for  the  ar3st  tried  to  wrest  truth  from  the  void.”  Barne&  Newman,  “ The  Plasmic  Imag,”  1945   Jackson  Pollock  in  front  of  a  blank  canvas  
  7. 7. Barne&  Newman  (1905-­‐1970)  The  “zip”  is  the  primal  moment  of  crea3on   “For  Newman  and  for   subsequent  art  historians,   Onement  I  (he  added  the   ordinate  aher  1948)  was  a   momentous  enactment  of   pain3ng  as  a  "tabula  rasa,"  a   primal  site  or  instance  of   "crea3on"  in  various  senses  of   the  term.”   Allen  Memorial  Museum   Barne&  Newman,  Onement  I,  1948   Museum  of  Modern  Art  
  8. 8. Barne&  Newman   (1905-­‐1970)  “Onement  I  symbolizes  Genesis.    It  is  an  act  of  crea3on  and  division.    Newman’s  zip  down  the  middle  evokes  God’s  separa3on  of  light  and  darkness,  a  line  drawn  in  the  void.    Like  the  Old  Testament  god,  the  ar3st  starts  with  chaos,  with  the  void  .  .  .  .  The  zip  is  the  primal  act.”  Jonathan  Fineberg,  p.  101   Barne&  Newman,  Onement  I,  1948   Museum  of  Modern  Art  
  9. 9. Barne&  Newman  (1905-­‐1970)  “The  La3n  3tle  of  this  pain3ng  can  be  translated  as  "Man,  heroic  and  sublime."    .  .  .  Newman  hoped  the  viewer  would  stand  close  to  his  expansive  work,  and  he  likened  the  experience  to  a  human  encounter.  “  Museum  of  Modern  Art   Barne&  Newman,  Vir  Heroicus  Sublimus,  1950-­‐1   7  11  3/8"  x  17  9  1/4"   Museum  of  Modern  Art  
  10. 10. Barne&  Newman  and  an  uniden3fied  viewer  with  Cathedra  in  Newmans  studio,  1958.  Photo  Peter  A.  Juley  Image  source:    h&p://www.artnet.com/Magazine/index/tuchman/tuchman4-­‐8-­‐3.asp  
  11. 11. Image  source:    h&p://www.flickr.com/photos/javierucles/212609489/  

×