Volunteer Orientation
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  • Welcome to our new volunteer orientation. Thank you for coming. I’m/we’re ___________________________________________. I’m/we’re leading your orientation session today. This is Cat Care’s 33rd year. Today, we’ll give you a brief history of the organization, as well as an idea of how our shelter operates. This will help you decide if this is the right place for you to volunteer your time. It is important that you are comfortable with all aspects of Cat Care Society so that you will have a more rewarding volunteer experience. This information is divided into nine parts, and after each we will pause to answer any questions you may have. <br />
  • We’d like to start by going around the room and introducing ourselves….please share your name and something about the cats in your life. <br />
  • Next, we’d like to share our Mission Statement: <br /> Cat Care Society operates a cage-free shelter for homeless and abused cats that provides adoption, counseling, <br /> humane education, and community outreach services to enrich the lives of people and cats. <br />
  • We are not considered a “No-Kill Shelter” nor are we a sanctuary. <br />
  • Cat Care began in Dr. Linda East’s Lincoln Street Veterinary Clinic in 1981 and became an official 501(C)(3) federally tax exempt nonprofit organization in October 1982. We were founded by Dr. East, along with Lynn Rowe. <br />
  • In 1985 the founders purchased a small home at 11th and Harlan in Lakewood which served as a shelter for the next 16 years. The house was sold when the shelter relocated to this 6th Avenue site. <br />
  • The current property was purchased in 1994. A Capital Campaign was established to raise funds to build a new shelter. It took 6 years of fundraising to break ground. This shelter was built at a cost of 1.2 million dollars and opened in 2001. <br />
  • In October, 2005, we were able to complete the lower level and open the Cat Clinic at Cat Care Society to serve both private pay clients and low income families. The building, clinic and property were paid off with funds from bequests, and are owned free and clear. <br />
  • The small white house on the front of the property is the original farmhouse. When the property was originally purchased, it was renovated to house a thrift shop. When the thrift shop closed, it was again rehabbed for much needed office space and it now holds 5 administrative offices and three cats. <br />
  • Any questions before moving on? <br />
  • Cat Care Society is a cageless shelter for cats with the following on-site space allocations: 50 adult cats, 15 kittens, and up to 6 Temporary Care cats. This number does not include cats and kittens that may be in foster-care. Our allocations are based on the health and well being of the cats in relation to the physical space capacity. <br />
  • CCS is licensed under the Pet Animal Care Facilities Act (PACFA), and we are periodically inspected by the Colorado State Department of Agriculture. We had our last routine inspection on February 20, 2014, and no violations were observed by the inspector. PACFA standards specify a specific # of square footage per cat. Our standard is actually higher than theirs. <br />
  • We have a volunteer staff of approximately 100, and paid staff of 20 <br /> including: <br /> Front Desk Adoption Team……….Dave Genco, Karlyn Mendez, Linda Langsted and David Speckman <br /> Veterinarian…………………………………….Lynne Rooks, DVM <br /> Various other paid positions include 3 veterinary technicians, administrative staff and housekeeping staff. Most of these positions are part-time. <br /> Cat Care Society is overseen and managed by a Board of Directors: <br /> President & CEO….……………… Diane Stoner <br /> Vice President………………… Maggie Holben <br /> Secretary…………………………...Gail Tinianow (Tin-yawn-oh) <br /> Treasurer………………………. Marggie (MAR-Gee… not MARGE-ee) Dassler <br /> Director………………………… Clyde Dawson <br /> + A Number of Advisory Board Members <br />
  • Cat Care Society is dependent on private funding for its existence. We receive <br /> no municipal support. <br />
  • The budget is supported by: <br /> Donations <br /> Bequests via will <br /> Need-specified grants <br /> Direct Mail Appeals <br /> Private pay care at The Cat Clinic <br /> Adoption Fees <br /> Meow Mart, cat toy and supplies shop <br /> Memberships <br /> Community Shares of Colorado (a workplace giving program) <br /> Annual Colorado Gives Day – Dec 9, 2014 <br /> Fundraisers: Tails of the Painted Cats, Santa Paws Festival, Feasting For Felines <br />
  • Any questions about how we operate? <br />
  • SURRENDERS: Stray, abandoned and abused cats are given priority for shelter on a first come, first served basis. Our residents also include surrendered cats and abused cats. Cat Care Society also works with other shelters to take in cats from emergency rescue situations, as space allows. <br />
  • Entry decisions are based on space as well as circumstances. CCS gets many calls a day from people wanting to surrender their cat(s). Generally speaking, arrangements are made by phone, and the date of entry is logged onto a clipboard. Many of our calls come from families who are moving, and leave placement of their cat(s) until the last minute. Since owned pets are not our priority, these people are frequently given advice on how to place their cats themselves, or referred to DDFL, the Denver Dumb Friends League. <br />
  • Upon acceptance, all cats are kenneled in the Receiving Room after they enter the shelter. Each cat is given a combination Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) & Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) test. If the cat tests positive, it is humanely euthanized. If the cat tests negative, it is then scheduled for an exam and processing as follows. Each adult cat is given a name, a collar and a tag, and a microchip. Each file includes their surrender form, a photo and a medical history form which serves as a record for any treatment the cat may have while at the shelter. Files also include a Personality Profile which is available to all staff to make comments and observations, thus enabling the adopter to be sensitive to habits and needs.Each cat under the age of 10 receives a FeCVR booster and routine treatment for parasites. All adults are spayed or neutered upon entry to the shelter. Medical needs are assessed and addressed, including dentals. <br />
  • Gestation for a cat is 63 days and the breeding season is practically year-round, running as early as February, and as late as December. Here, March through September is generally regarded as the breeding season for cats…or “kitten season,” as well call it here at the shelter. <br />   <br /> We only take in pregnant cats if we have a foster home available to accept her and bring her to term. When the kittens are weaned, at about 6 weeks of age, the Mom cat comes back to the shelter for spay and adoption. The kittens remain in foster until 8 wks and at least two pounds. <br />   <br /> Because of this, we are regularly recruiting volunteer kitten fosters to our team. <br />
  • When all entry procedures have been completed, the cat is assessed for placement within the shelter. There are 7 cat rooms, including a kitten room, as well as the big hall*. Wherever the cat is placed, it is introduced to new roommates by temporary placement in a large stress cage. Adjustment periods vary cat by cat. When a cat is placed in one of the cat rooms, it is officially up for adoption. Different rooms may be tried until a compatible situation is found. ** <br /> *The Hall is generally used for cats that need more supervision for behavioral issues, health issues, or cats that refuse to be confined. <br /> ** Temporary Care cats may also be found in the cat rooms mingling with other cats. These cats are designated by wearing a tag that says “Not for Adoption”. <br />   <br /> Kittens, upon returning to the shelter, are spayed or neutered as well as micro-chipped prior to adoption. They are then placed in the kitten room for adoption. <br />
  • Now it’s time for your questions about Part III. <br />
  • Although we do have volunteer adoption assistants, only qualified staff members are permitted to adopt out the cats. The volunteers assist on Saturdays, but they do not make the final decision on applications. Unlike the average pet shop, adopters go through a screening process to determine whether it’s an appropriate match. If it isn’t, we will try to steer that person towards another more suitable cat, or possibly decline the adoption. <br />
  • An adoption may be declined for the following reasons: <br /> A potential adopter does not believe in keeping a cat indoors. <br /> A potential adopter wants to adopt a young kitten, but has small children in the home (Kittens 6 mo and up are recommended for children under the age of 5). <br /> A person who wants to adopt a cat/kitten as a gift for someone else as a surprise. <br /> A potential adopter who has other animals in the home which are not neutered. <br /> If a potential adopter rents and we are unable to verify pet permission with the landlord or manager. <br />
  • Regular adoptions are $90.00 for all cats and kittens. Special price breaks available at this time include: <br /> Cats over ten years old may be adopted for a Name Your Price donation. <br /> Seniors may adopt a cat 5 years + for $65.00. <br /> Pairs of cats (min 6 months old) are $150.00 <br /> The price includes leukemia/FIV testing, spay/ neuter, microchip, shots (kitten or booster, no rabies), treatment for internal parasites, collar & ID tag, 15-day health care assistance and a cardboard cat carrier.  <br />
  • All adoptions are followed up after one week with a phone call from our staff. Any cat adopted from CCS is guaranteed acceptance back into the shelter if the owner is unable to keep it for any reason. <br />
  • Do you have questions about adoptions? <br />
  • Now we’ll take a short 5-10 minute break. Please stand up, stretch at bit, get some of the refreshments. The restrooms are down the hall. <br />
  • Please do not refer to Cat Care Society as a “No Kill” shelter. Although cats are not routinely euthanized to make space for others, there are several reasons a cat may be humanely put to sleep. Reasons for euthanasia include: <br /> Feline Leukemia/FIV positive <br /> Aggressive toward humans <br /> Feral <br /> Terminally ill/suffering <br /> Psychologically unsuited for shelter life (severely stressed) <br /> Each decision to euthanize is carefully thought out, and always made in the best interest of the cat, not for the convenience of the staff. Decision to euthanize is approved by a board member and the staff veterinarian. <br /> It is extremely important that everyone here today respects the decisions in this matter. Your support in this sensitive area will be greatly appreciated. <br />
  • Do you have questions about euthanasia? <br />
  • YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH THE SHELTER CATS - Approach with caution at all times, and set an example for those around you. Always extend your hand and let a cat sniff first. Then watch the body language to decide whether or not to continue. If you note growling, laying down of the ears, <br /> backing away, swiping at you, leave the cat alone. We all have a way with cats or we wouldn’t be here, but shelter cats are stressed, and act differently than your cats at home. Some suggestions: <br /> Don’t feel you have to save them. They are well cared for here, and they are awaiting homes. Kindness and attention will help them toward that end. <br />   <br /> Don’t adopt on a whim. Consider the balance of your pets at home, and consider what’s best for them. (Many volunteers decide to sponsor their favorite cat at $25.00 per month to help with the upkeep until they are adopted.) <br />
  • If you see signs of a fight between two cats, slow down and use your head. Look for a water bottle, and spray the aggressor. Then call for staff. Do not try to break it up with your hands or leg. By trying to grab an angry cat, you are subject to redirected aggression, and you will be bitten. (Another way to deter a fight is to toss a blanket or towel over the aggressor to disorient him, and slow things down. Then get staff involved because they are trained to handle cats. <br />
  • If you are bitten while in the shelter, you are required to report it to staff. Be sure to let them know, to the best of your ability, if it was prompted by over-stimulation or sudden stress caused by another cat nearby, or unprovoked. <br /> If you are bitten, flush the wound with peroxide and monitor it for infection. If you see swelling, pain and possibly red streaking, please see your doctor. <br />
  • Do you have questions about your relationship with the shelter cats? <br />
  • Our volunteer staff currently averages at about 100. The program is designed to accommodate the needs of the shelter as well as provide structure and flexibility to what we hope is a rewarding volunteer experience. <br />   <br /> Please review the Volunteer Task Sheet to see what volunteer opportunities are available at this time. If any of the jobs listed appeal to you and work for you time- wise, you are welcome to apply for that position by filling out a contact sheet and leaving it with us today. You will be contacted to discuss your interests, qualifications and to set up a time for a personal interview. <br />
  • You will be expected to commit to up to 25 hours over a 6 month period, roughly 4 hours per month. Some of you will prefer a weekly or monthly schedule. If you commit to a schedule you are obligated to work your shift or find a replacement by trading. If you travel a lot, or if you do not like driving in winter conditions, please avoid schedules that would conflict. <br />   <br /> All volunteer staff is required to log their time after a shift is completed. The hours are transferred and used in statistic reports for grants and funding. <br />
  • When you assume a scheduled volunteer position you will most likely be part of a team of volunteers trained to do the same thing. This gives you shift trading flexibility, and you must be prepared to either work your shift or trade it off for another. When you fill a hole on an existing schedule, the schedule is redone to include you, and each team member gets a copy of the new schedule and current roster. <br />
  • According to the task you are assigned to you, will have a staff supervisor, however, <br /> our volunteer coordinator is your liaison with Cat Care. If you become stretched too thin, let our volunteer coordinator know. If you must drop out of a scheduled task, we will need to replace you and advance notice is greatly appreciated. If you have any problems with staff, other volunteers, or concerns regarding policy, or if you would like to change tasks, please come in and talk to the volunteer coordinator about it. We will do whatever we can to make your volunteer experience with CCS positive. <br />
  • Purr-Forum newsletter is published quarterly and mailed to each volunteer. You will find updates about the shelter and our cats, recaps on past fundraisers and sign-ups for future events. We also have a special access area for volunteers on the website. You will also receive Cat Care Quarterly every three months. This is the organization’s business news, and it is mailed to a supporter list of approximately 3500. We also have a Constant Contact e-mail newsletter called the “Cat Care Society Mews,” which you can sign up for if you’re not already on the list. Plus, we are active on all the social channels: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr, Pinterest, Google Plus, Tumblr, Instagram and Blogger. <br />
  • What are your questions about the volunteer program and staying connected? <br />
  • Cat Care Society has a variety of programs and services designed to aid the community and develop additional support for our mission beyond running the shelter and its adoption program. These activities include nursing home visits, Nibbles & Kibbles Cat Food Bank, veterinary care for qualifying low-income families (including low cost spay/neuter programs), humane education for young people (including school groups and scout troops), temporary care for cats, behavior counseling, lost & found, humane trap rental, and our new monthly educational seminar series. <br />
  • What are your questions about Cat Care Society’s community outreach programs? <br />
  • Cat Care Society’s Foster Care Program is currently managed by Shelter Veterinary Technician Morgan Bergson. Each foster care parent is a regular CCS volunteer who has chosen this special area to focus on. A few facts about this program: <br />   <br /> All foster care volunteers must attend an annual training/update meeting in March or April of each year. <br /> We have approximately20 foster care families. <br /> We currently use 15 to16 at any given time. <br /> The average number of cats in any foster home is a family of 4. <br /> The average stay for the cats at the home is 4 weeks, but can range from 10 weeks to as few as 2 weeks. <br /> Foster homes are managed carefully; all the cats will be re-entering the shelter, so the numbers are not allowed to get out of control. <br /> Foster homes are monitored for necessary space and consistency of socialization. <br /> All cats and kittens are adopted at the shelter, never through foster homes. <br /> Foster homes are not used for “extra space”, i.e. temporary homes for cats waiting adoption. <br />
  • What are your questions about the Foster Care program? <br />
  • NEXT STEPS - Please fill out your Contact Sheet, if you haven’t already done so and turn it in today. We will contact you to arrange for a convenient interview time. We will be in touch with you periodically for feedback about your volunteer experience. We’ll be heading out to tour the shelter in just a few minutes. <br />
  • Thank you for being here today! <br />

Volunteer Orientation Volunteer Orientation Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome
  • Introductions Sue Bob 2
  • Mission Statement Cat Care Society operates a cage-free shelter for homeless and abused cats that provides adoption, counseling, humane education, and community outreach services to enrich the lives of people and cats. 3
  • About Cat Care Society • We are not considered A ‘No-Kill’ Shelter • We are not an Animal Sanctuary 4
  • Part I: History • Founded in 1981 at the Linda East, DVM, Veterinary Clinic, 855 Lincoln St. in Denver, by Dr. East and Lynn Rowe. • Became an official 501(c)(3) tax exempt nonprofit organization in 1982. 5
  • 1985: 11th and Harlan in Lakewood 6
  • The current property was purchased in 1994. A Capital Campaign was established to raise funds to build a new shelter. It took 6 years of fundraising to break ground. This shelter was built at a cost of 1.2 million dollars and opened in 2001. 7
  • In October, 2005, we were able to complete the lower level and open The Cat Clinic at Cat Care Society to serve both private pay clients and low income families. The building, clinic and property were paid off with funds from bequests, and are owned free and clear. 8
  • ● The small white house on the front of the property is the original farmhouse. ● Used as a thrift shop in the past. ●Later remodeled for office space and now hosts 5 administrative offices and three cats. 9
  • Part II: How We Operate Capacity at the Shelter: •50 adult cats •15 kittens •6 Temporary Care cats •Foster-care •Woofs ‘n Hoofs Cat Room 11
  • PACFA: Pet Animal Care Facilities Act • We’re periodically inspected by the State under PACFA regulations • PACFA standards specify a specific # of square footage per cat • Our standard is actually higher than PACFA’s 12
  • Staff & Board Mgmt Team • Volunteer staff of approximately 100 • Paid staff of 20, Including: Front Desk Adoption Team……….Dave Genco, Karlyn Mendez, Linda Langsted and David Speckman Veterinarian……………….Lynne Rooks, DVM • CCS is overseen and managed by a Board of Directors: President & CEO….………………Diane Stoner Vice President………………… Maggie Holben Secretary…………………………...Gail Tinianow Treasurer………………………. Marggie Dassler Director……………………………. Clyde Dawson + Additional Advisory Board Members 13
  • • Cat Care Society Is Privately Funded Funding • Cat Care Society Receives No Taxpayer support, like the Municipal Shelters do 14
  • • Donations • Bequests via a will • Need-specified grants • Direct Mail Appeals • Private pay care at The Cat Clinic • Adoption Fees • Meow Mart • Memberships • Community Shares (workplace giving) • Colorado Gives Day • King Soopers Cards • Fundraisers: Tails of the Painted Cats Santa Paws Festival Feasting For Felines Other Events 15
  • Part III – Shelter Procedures • Stray, abandoned and abused cats are given priority for shelter on a first come, first served basis. • Residents include surrendered cats and abused cats. • Cat Care Society also works with other shelters to assist in emergency rescue, as space allows. 17
  • Entry Decisions • Based on space as well as circumstances. • CCS gets many calls a day from people wanting to surrender their cat(s). Arrangements are usually made by phone. • Owned pets are not our priority; these callers are frequently given advice on how to place their cats themselves, or referred to the Denver Dumb Friends League (DDFL). 18
  • Upon Acceptance • Each adult cat is given a name, a collar and a tag, and a microchip. Each file includes their surrender form, a photo and a medical history form which serves as a record for any treatment the cat may have while at the shelter. Files also include a Personality Profile which is available to all staff to make comments and observations, thus enabling the adopter to be sensitive to habits and needs. • Each cat under the age of 10 receives a FeCVR booster and routine treatment for parasites. • All adults are spayed or neutered upon entry to the shelter. • Medical needs are assessed and addressed, including dentals. 19
  • Pregnant Cats • Gestation for a cat is 63 days. • March through September is generally regarded as the breeding season for cats…or “kitten season,” as well call it here at the shelter. • We only take in pregnant cats if we have a foster home available to accept her and bring her to term. When the kittens are weaned, at about 6 weeks of age, the Mom cat comes back to the shelter for spay and adoption. The kittens remain in foster until 8 wks and at least two pounds. 20
  • Placement At The Shelter • There are 7 cat rooms, including a kitten room. • Plus, the big hall, used for cats needing more supervision. • Different rooms may be tried until a compatible situation is found. • Temporary Care cats may also be found in the cat rooms mingling with other cats. These cats are designated by wearing a tag that says “Not for Adoption”. • Kittens, upon returning to the shelter, are spayed or neutered as well as micro-chipped prior to adoption. They are then placed in the kitten room for adoption. 21
  • • We do have volunteer adoption assistants. • Only qualified staff members are permitted to adopt out the cats. • Adopters go through a screening process. • If it isn’t a match, we will try to steer that person towards another more suitable cat, or possibly decline the adoption. Part IV – Adoptions 23
  • Declined Adoptions • Potential adopter does not believe in keeping a cat indoors. • Potential adopter wants to adopt a young kitten, but has small children in the home (only kittens 6 mo and up are recommended for children under the age of 5). • A person who wants to adopt a cat/kitten as a gift for someone else as a surprise. • Potential adopter has other animals in the home which are not neutered. • Potential adopter rents and we are unable to verify pet permission with the landlord or manager. 24
  • Regular Adoptions • $90.00 for all cats and kittens. Specials at this time include: • Cats over ten years old may be adopted for a Name Your Price donation. • Seniors may adopt a cat 5 years + for $65.00. • Pairs of cats (min 6 months old) are $150.00 • The price includes leukemia/FIV testing, spay/ neuter, microchip, shots (kitten or booster, no rabies), treatment for internal parasites, collar & ID tag, 15-day health care assistance and a cardboard cat carrier. 25
  • Follow Up All adoptions are followed up after one week with a phone call from our staff. Any cat adopted from CCS is guaranteed acceptance back into the shelter if the owner is unable to keep it for any reason. 26
  • Reasons for euthanasia include: •Feline Leukemia/FIV positive •Aggressive toward humans •Feral •Terminally ill/suffering •Psychologically unsuited for shelter life (severely stressed) Part V – Euthanasia 29
  • • Don’t feel you have to save them. They are well cared for here, and they are awaiting homes. Kindness and attention will help them toward that end. • Don’t adopt on a whim. Consider the balance of your pets at home, and consider what’s best for them. (Many volunteers decide to sponsor their favorite cat at $25.00 per month to help with the upkeep until they are adopted.) Part VI – You & Shelter Cats 31
  • Cat Fights • Stay calm. • Look for a water bottle, and spray the aggressor. Then call for staff. • Do not try to break a fight up with your hands or leg. • Another way to deter a fight is to toss a blanket or towel over the aggressor to disorient him, and slow things down. • Always get staff involved because they are trained to handle cats. 32
  • If A Shelter Cat Bites You • If you are bitten while in the shelter, you are required to report it to staff. Be sure to let them know, to the best of your ability, if it was prompted by over-stimulation or sudden stress caused by another cat nearby, or unprovoked. • If you are bitten, flush the wound with peroxide and monitor it for infection. If you see swelling, pain and possibly red streaking, please see your doctor. 33
  • Helpful Tips • Always read cage signs and act accordingly. • Always keep closed doors closed. • The cats are separated for reasons. • Disinfect your hands frequently, and change your clothes before handling your cats at home. • If you notice unusual behavior, or vomiting or a cat being threatened by another cat, report it to shelter staff. 34
  • • Our volunteer staff currently averages at about 100. The program is designed to accommodate the needs of the shelter as well as provide structure and flexibility to what we hope is a rewarding volunteer experience. • Please review the Volunteer Task Sheet to see what volunteer opportunities are available at this time. If any of the jobs listed appeal to you and work for you time- wise, you are welcome to apply for that position by filling out a contact sheet and leaving it with us today. You will be contacted to discuss your interests, qualifications and to set up a time for a personal interview. Part VII – The Volunteer Program 36
  • Time Commitment • You will be expected to commit to up to 25 hours over a 6 month period, roughly 4 hours per month. Some of you will prefer a weekly or monthly schedule. If you commit to a schedule you are obligated to work your shift or find a replacement by trading. If you travel a lot, or if you do not like driving in winter conditions, please avoid schedules that would conflict. • All volunteer staff is required to log their time after a shift is completed. The hours are transferred and used in statistic reports for grants and funding. 37
  • Team Concept When you assume a scheduled volunteer position you will most likely be part of a team of volunteers trained to do the same thing. This gives you shift trading flexibility, and you must be prepared to either work your shift or trade it off for another. When you fill a hole on an existing schedule, the schedule is redone to include you, and each team member gets a copy of the new schedule and current roster. 38
  • Reporting Process • According to the task you are assigned to, you will have a staff supervisor, however, our volunteer coordinator is your liaison with Cat Care. • If you become stretched too thin, let our volunteer coordinator know. If you must drop out of a scheduled task, we will need to replace you and advance notice is greatly appreciated. • If you have any problems with staff, other volunteers, or concerns regarding policy, or if you would like to change tasks, please come in and talk to the volunteer coordinator about it. • We will do whatever we can to make your volunteer experience with CCS positive. 39
  • Staying Connected • Purr-Forum newsletter. We also have a special access area for volunteers on the website. • Cat Care Quarterly. • Constant Contact e-newsletter - “Cat Care Society Mews” • Plus, we are active on all the social media channels: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr, Pinterest, Google Plus, Tumblr, Instagram and Blogger. 40
  • Part VIII: Community Outreach • Nursing Home Visits • Nibbles & Kibbles Cat Food Bank • Veterinary Care for Qualifying Low-Income Families, including low cost spay/neuter programs • Humane Education for Young People • Temporary Care for Cats • Behavior Counseling • Lost & Found • Humane Trap Rental • Monthly Educational Seminar Series 42
  • Part IX: Foster Care Program • Annual training/update meeting is held in March or April each year. • We have approximately 20 foster care families and currently use 15 to 16 at any given time. • The average number of cats in any foster home is a family of 4. The average stay for the cats at the home is 4 weeks, but can range from 10 weeks to as few as 2 weeks. • Foster homes are managed carefully and monitored for necessary space and consistency of socialization. • All cats and kittens are adopted at the shelter, never through foster homes. Foster homes are not used for “extra space”, i.e. temporary homes for cats waiting adoption. 44
  • Next Steps • Please fill out your Contact Sheet, if you haven’t already done so and turn it in today. • We will contact you to arrange for a convenient interview time. • We will be in touch with you periodically for feedback about your volunteer experience. • Please take time to tour the shelter today. 46