Ravers and Rude boys<br />
Acid house raver.<br />A raver today<br />
Ravers<br />Ravers derived from the 50’s mod subculture, where it describes the madness and frenzy of a feeling and the de...
Rude boys/ bling hip hoppers <br />Derived from the poorer parts of new york where poverty of African American young men w...
Bling Hip-hoppers<br />Bling hip hoppers refer to young men who came from poor backgrounds, who try to overcome this by sh...
Ravers Social class background<br />Usually working class young individuals.<br />They were usually football enthusiasts.<...
Values and Beliefs of Ravers <br />They believed that enjoying the high of a party was important. <br />They like to have ...
Ravers today:<br />Are much more about having fun and being cool (Dazed and Confused)<br />They are more into the looks an...
Where are Rude boys evident in a film ?<br />‘Ali g in the house’<br />
How does Ali-G link to the ‘rude boy’<br /><ul><li>Gold, heavy jewellery ‘bling’
Baggy tracksuit: brightly coloured
Facial expression looks aggressive and serious
Beanie hat: covers his hair
Name emblazoned on tracksuit supports the value that ‘gangstas’ are the most important people in their social hierarchy</l...
Synopsis <br />The Cardiff club scene in the 90's: five best friends deal with their relationships and their personal demo...
Values <br /><ul><li>Taking a ‘spliff’ aids you having a good time
Its okay to casually drink; whenever you want to (more relaxed to the social taboo then the mainstream)
The club life is fun; Djs and raving music such as: "Flowerz"
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  1. 1. Ravers and Rude boys<br />
  2. 2. Acid house raver.<br />A raver today<br />
  3. 3. Ravers<br />Ravers derived from the 50’s mod subculture, where it describes the madness and frenzy of a feeling and the desire for it to never end. <br />Buddy Holly’s 1958 hit called “rave on” is an example of the earliest reference to rave culture in the 50’s. <br />In the late 80’s ravers was much more associated with electronic music, although it was a commonly used term for mid 60’s garage rock and psychedelic bands. <br />Due to rapid change of pop culture in the UK during 63-66(and the hippie era beyond) the term rave fell out of use.<br />During mid-late 80’s, acid house parties(mainstream parties consisting of around 40,000 people) were rebranded rave-ups.<br />The rave parties of 88-89 were compared to football matches as they provided a setting for working-class unification due to a union in decline and few jobs available, also many ravers were die-hard football fans. <br /> the modern term of the raver wasn’t really established until 1991.<br />
  4. 4. Rude boys/ bling hip hoppers <br />Derived from the poorer parts of new york where poverty of African American young men were ignored.<br />Rap was a product from this culture, it was about telling the tales, like soul/jazz in the 1800’s of these young men. <br />Society did not give them an opportunity and they were against a rich mainstream society.<br />Rude boys initially come from Jamaica in the 50’s where rude boy was referred to someone who was a trouble maker. <br />In contemporary culture, a rude boy is someone who like rap music and dress/ act like a gangster etc. <br />
  5. 5. Bling Hip-hoppers<br />Bling hip hoppers refer to young men who came from poor backgrounds, who try to overcome this by showing off what they have achieved. E.g. many rappers are keen to show off their bling and women to show that by making money they have overcome their struggles of poverty and are now living the ‘good life’. <br />
  6. 6. Ravers Social class background<br />Usually working class young individuals.<br />They were usually football enthusiasts.<br />They usually followed magazines informing them of how to be a raver. Including mainstream newspapers such the NME, Melody maker and the Record Mirror.<br />They usually just wanted to have fun and rebel against institutions such as the government which had been targeting ravers and acid house parties by cracking down upon them. <br />
  7. 7. Values and Beliefs of Ravers <br />They believed that enjoying the high of a party was important. <br />They like to have fun while the next day attending school, college etc. <br />No boundaries at raves etc. <br />By the late 80’s to the 90’s they were constantly targeted by the mainstream media due to the fact that politicians and other members didn’t like them. They were associated with drugs therefore a lot of institutions were against the rave culture. <br />
  8. 8. Ravers today:<br />Are much more about having fun and being cool (Dazed and Confused)<br />They are more into the looks and the enjoyment of a rave then the core values and beliefs of anti authority held by 80’s acid test partiers .<br />A lot of raves today are based on 90’s electro and other alternative sounds. <br />
  9. 9. Where are Rude boys evident in a film ?<br />‘Ali g in the house’<br />
  10. 10.
  11. 11. How does Ali-G link to the ‘rude boy’<br /><ul><li>Gold, heavy jewellery ‘bling’
  12. 12. Baggy tracksuit: brightly coloured
  13. 13. Facial expression looks aggressive and serious
  14. 14. Beanie hat: covers his hair
  15. 15. Name emblazoned on tracksuit supports the value that ‘gangstas’ are the most important people in their social hierarchy</li></li></ul><li>Where are Ravers evident in a film ?<br />‘Human Traffic’<br />
  16. 16. Synopsis <br />The Cardiff club scene in the 90's: five best friends deal with their relationships and their personal demons during a weekend. Starting on a Friday afternoon, with preparations for clubbing, the film follows the five from Ecstasy-induced fun through a booze-laden come-down early Saturday morning followed by the weekend's aftermath. It's breakthrough time for at least three of them.<br />
  17. 17.
  18. 18. Values <br /><ul><li>Taking a ‘spliff’ aids you having a good time
  19. 19. Its okay to casually drink; whenever you want to (more relaxed to the social taboo then the mainstream)
  20. 20. The club life is fun; Djs and raving music such as: "Flowerz"
  21. 21. Written by Armand Van Helden, "Kill the Pain"Written by G. Philippou and "My Last Request"Written by D. Douglas & M. Hamilton are good music which ravers enjoy partying to </li></li></ul><li>Goths!<br />
  22. 22. Where do goths originate from?<br /><ul><li>Introduced to England in early 1980s during gothic rock scene
  23. 23. Image inspired by gothic literature and the popularity with horror films
  24. 24. Goths collaborate a mixture of Punk, death rock and Victorian fashion </li></li></ul><li>Beliefs of Goths<br />Most goths become goths because they have been spurned by 'normal' society because the way they want to live their lives does not fit in with how most people are told to live theirs. <br />Goths are free thinkers, people who do not accept the moral rules of society because they're told 'This is just how it is' or 'This is what God says!'. Rather goths tend to listen to what you have to say, and make up their own mind. This kind of free thinking and rejection of dogma earns only rejection in todays society.<br />However because of this rejection from 'normal' society, goths have banded together to associate with other free thinkers. This has a beneficial effect on both the individual and society as a whole. For the individual they have a sense of belonging, and friends they can associate with. For society it removes one more misfit filled with rage from society's streets.<br />This of course is not the case for all goths. Many goths today are goths for a variety of other reasons. They like the music, or the clubs are better, they have goth friends and joined in with them, or they just like staying up late nights and goths are the only ones awake to talk to.<br />
  25. 25. History of the goth<br />Modern goth (ignoring where the name itself originally comes from) started in the early 80's as part of the punk subculture (which is itself was a rejection of most societal values, and anything considered part of the 'norm'). The phrase was coined by the band manager of Joy Division, Anthony H. Wilson, who described the band as 'Gothic compared with the pop mainstream'. <br />The term stuck, and as punk eventually died, Goth survived and became its own subculture. <br />The punk clothing and hairstyles mellowed, and the core 'rejection of society' attitude alone lived on in the gothic subculture. Over time this itself has been modified to be more of a 'no more blind acceptance of society's values' as opposed to rejection because it was there to be rejected (and because you could get away with it!).<br />
  26. 26. Stereotypes of goths<br />Goths tend to be non-violent, pacifistic, passive, and tolerant. Many in the media have mistakenly associated Goth with extreme violence and hatred of minorities, white supremacy, etc.<br />Many Goths write about being depressed. Followers seem sullen and withdrawn, when in public. They are often much more "happy and carefree in the company of [other] Goths.<br />A lot of people turn to the Gothic subculture after having a hard time in school, feeling alienated, and looking for a way to express themselves that  mirrors those feelings. Others find the scene through literature, still others want to be shocking, and some people just find black clothing slimming." <br />Goth music often deals with thought-provoking topics, concentrating on societal evils, like racism, war, hatred of groups, etc. Their music tends to concentrate on the very "nasty, unhappy" topics that "North American culture" wants to "ignore and forget."<br />A fascination with death. They try "to find a different way of thinking about life, like trying to find beauty in life, pain and death. It's all a quest for immortality.<br />

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