Effective
PowerPoint
Mary Helen Hendrix
IDC Director
Always Keep In Mind
Everything is best for something and worst for
something else. The trick is knowing what is what,
for ...
Agenda
• Key Elements
• Options for Enhancing Presentations
• Additional Resources
• Question & Answer
Why Use PowerPoint?
• Adaptable
• Accessible
• Target multiple modalities
• Reinforce content
• Focus attention on content...
Number 1 Rule of PowerPoint
Just because you
can, does NOT mean
you should
Key Elements
• Size/Fonts
• Transition
• Images
• Sound
• Color
• Animation
• Hyperlinks
Font Size
• Can you read this? (14 pts)
• Can you read this? (16 pts)
• Can you read this? (18 pts)
• Can you read this? (...
Font Type
Serif Font
Times Roman, Garamond, Georgia
Sans Serif Font
Arial, Tahoma, Verdana
Font Personality
• Appearance of font gives a certain mood
• Meaning of the words are effected by the font
Text Tips
• Six words per line
• Use numbers sparingly
• Three to six points per slide
• Limit to twenty words per slide
•...
10/20/30 Rule
• 10 slides
• 20 minutes of talk
• 30 minimum font size
Transition
Consistency is the Key
• Consistent Color Schemes
• Consistent formatting
• Avoid Distractions
Transition
Images
• Reinforce/Expand Content
–Example
• Replace Text
• Use Good Quality
• Viewable at a Distance
Image Tips
• Maintain balance
• Design not decoration
• Big, clear, relevant
• Left placement leads eye to text
Sound
• Support or Extend Content
–Example
• Issues to consider
–Transport with presentation
–Use with care, can be distra...
Color
• Contrast Text & Background
Dark Background with
Light Text
Light Background with
Dark Text
Dark Background with
Li...
Color
• Cool for background Warm for foreground
• Dark room: dark background
• Light room: light background
• Three colors...
Color Symbolism
• Think of your audience
– Cultural
– Age
– Class
– Gender
• Example: white Native America: Peace and happ...
Pick the Orange Hat
Consider Color Sensitivity
Consider Color Sensitivity
Normal Red/Green Blue/Yellow
Animation Tips
• Support, Not Distract
• Make Fit Content
• No Transition is Just Fine
• Multiple Transition Types Annoy
Bad Example
Rubbish, Inc Testimonials
– Robert Johnson:
“I use Rubbish, Inc. for all my rubbish requirements-
it’s their p...
Animation
• Control Order of Appearance
–Good for quizzing
• Focus Audience Attention
• Can be Distracting
• Lost when sav...
Hyperlinks
• Access supplemental material
• Pose and answer questions
• Omit slides
• Non-Linear presentations
Presentation Tips
• To temporarily clear screen press W or B
• Tell the truth
• Get to the point
• Choose the right format...
Key Elements Examples
• Less Effective Gettysburg Address
• More Effective Gettysburg Address
Summary
• Communication is the key
• Text supports the communication
• Pictures simplify complex concepts
• Animations for...
Some Final Words
• PowerPoint as an aid to presentation, not the
presentation
• Exterior Content and Interior Content are ...
KNOW WHEN TO STOP
References
• Catalyst Teaching: Enhance Presentations:
• Addressing Diverse Learning Styles Through the
Use of Multimedia
...
Question and Answer
Supplemental
Slides Follow
Are Serif or Sans Serif fonts
better for presentations?
Answer: Sans Serif fonts
What is the number 1 rule of
PowerPoint?
Answer
Interesting Acoustic
Instruments
From the Chrysalis Foundation
Chrysalis
Harmonic/Melodic
Canon
Diamond
Mirimamba
Glassdan...
Second Page
• Your Text here
• Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer
adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh
euismod tin...
Effective power pointseminar
Effective power pointseminar
Effective power pointseminar
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  • Use key words and phrases and include only essential information to keepthe audience focused and interested.
  • A good technique to see if you’re choosing appropriate fonts is to use a font that seems completely opposite of what you’re trying to convey. Seeing how “wrong” this can look might help you pick a more appropriate font.
  • Too much text makes the slide unreadable. You may just as well show a blank slide. Stick to a few key words.  If your audience is reading the slides they are not paying attention to you. If possible, make your point with graphics instead of text. You can use Word Art, or a clip art image of a sign, to convey text in a more interesting way. By talking whilst your audience is reading the text you will overload their verbal channel, create a split attention effect, render yourself redundant and be guaranteed to lose their attention (they won’t be able to listen whilst they’re reading).The solution is to present to the verbal and visual channel in harmony: limit your text to just your key message, narrate all your content and use properly targeted visual aids on your slides.Use key words and phrases and include only essential information to keepthe audience focused and interested. slide show should only be used as an accompaniment to your talk.NumbersNumbers are usually confusing to the audience. Use as few as possible and allow extra time for the audience to do the math. Numbers should never be ultra precise:  “Anticipated Revenues of $660,101.83” looks silly. Are your numbers that accurate? Just say $660 thousand. “The Break Even Point is 1048.17 units. Are you selling fractions of a unit? Don’t show pennies. Cost per unit is about the only time you would need to show pennies.If you have more than 12-15 numbers on a slide, that’s probably too many. Using only one number per sentence helps the audience absorb the data. Don’t use all caps. Your viewer cannot distinguish what is importantAvoid text slides. Use text occasionally as a reference point for big ideas; e.g. the three main objectives of a lesson.
  • 10 Slides Constrains the Presenter to Choose Wisely but there is no perfect number of slides. How many slides do you need?Sure, 10 may seem like an arbitrary number, but putting a limit on the number of slides you are allowed is a valuable constraint. Most people probably have 20, or 30, or 100 slides for a 1-hour presentation. Trimming this number down to 10 forces you to evaluate the necessity of each and every slide. Just like every element of your presentation, if the slide isn’t necessary, it should be cut.It also encourages a presenter to design wisely. Often a single well-designed diagram eliminates the need for 5 bullet-point slides.No perfect speaking duration: 20 minutes assumes 1 hour slot, 20 min talk and 40 min Q&A. talk 1/3 of time but depends on format of event.There’s no Perfect Font Size30-point font might be an optimal size, but it might be too small or too large. The optimal size depends on several factors:how much text is on your slides (aim for less!)the contrast between the text and background colorsthe lighting in the roomthe distance between your audience and the screenthe quality of the projectorthe vision of your audiencethe time of day (Is your audience tired? Have they been looking at slides all day?)
  • Balance refers to the distribution of visual weight within a composition. Lack of balance disturbs the harmony of a composition. A work that is unbalanced visually creates tension. Imagine there's a scale in the middle of your screen. Make sure the objects on one side add up to the same visual weight as the other. That'll make your layout look comfortable and stable.Place in similar location on screenPlace graphics off center to leave room for text creating better balance which pleases the eye.Proportion. Here's a design trick invented by the ancient Greeks: When you're scaling your shapes, start with the smallest, and make all the subsequent shapes 1.6 times bigger than the last. That's the Golden Ratio, and it's like a shortcut for calculating the right proportions. You see it reproduced everywhere in nature and architecture.
  • Color evokes feelings. Color is emotional. The right color can help persuade and motivate. Studies show that color usage can increase interest and improve learning comprehension and retention.You do not need to be an expert in color theory, but it's good for business professionals to know at least a bit on the subject. Colors can be divided into two general categories: cool (such as blue and green) and warm (such as orange and red). Cool colors work best for backgrounds, as they appear to recede away from us into the background. Warm colors generally work best for objects in the foreground (such as text) because they appear to be coming at us. It is no surprise, then, that the most ubiquitous PowerPoint slide color scheme includes a blue background with yellow text. You do not need to feel compelled to use this color scheme, although you may choose to use a variation of those colors.If you will be presenting in a dark room (such as a large hall), a dark background (dark blue, gray, etc.) with white or light text will work fine. But if you plan to keep most of the lights on (which is highly advisable), a white background with black or dark text works much better. In rooms with a good deal of ambient light, a screen image with a dark background and light text tends to washout, but dark text on a light background will maintain its visual intensity a bit better.For example, if you have a form with required fields, making the text red might not be a big enough distinction for a color blind person. Add another cue, such as an icon or other element to indicate that the field is required.
  • Colors are an element of design that people react to on a visceral level. (example: red has been shown to raise blood pressure: U.S. many hospitals dress their nurses in light blues and pale pinks. This is because these are calming, soothing colors, and upset patients relax a little in their presence.) When choosing the colors for your site, you need to first (as always) think of your audience. Is it a global audience? Is it primarily Western? Eastern? Are they older? Younger? Male? Female? All of these things, and more can affect the color choices for your site. Age: Young children tend to prefer brighter, more solid colors, while adults tend to prefer more subdued colors. Class: orking class people tend to prefer colors that you can name: like blue, red, green, etc. While more highly educated classes tend to prefer colors that are more obscure: like taupe, azure, mauve, etc.Gender: In many cultures, men tend to prefer cooler colors (blues and greens) while women tend to prefer warmer colors (reds and oranges). Western men are also more likely to be color blind and so unable to see some of the differences in color on Web pages.
  • Rationale: The same advice applies for Animations as for Transitions. Make sure that every design decision you make has a reason within the context of your presentation.
  • 10/20/30 Rule -- no more than 10 slides, no longer than 20 minutes, and no smaller than 30 point font10 Slides Constrains the Presenter to Choose WiselySure, 10 may seem like an arbitrary number, but putting a limit on the number of slides you are allowed is a valuable constraint. Most people probably have 20, or 30, or 100 slides for a 1-hour presentation. Trimming this number down to 10 forces you to evaluate the necessity of each and every slide. Just like every element of your presentation, if the slide isn’t necessary, it should be cut.It also encourages a presenter to design wisely. Often a single well-designed diagram eliminates the need for 5 bullet-point slides.
  • Creating Handouts and Other Supplemental Material –Lectures are easy to illustrate when you use PowerPoint to create and edit your slides. You can create handouts of your PowerPoint outline for your students so they can focus on listening instead of copying everything down. You might want to focus on illustrating specific processes or the “big picture” with a PowerPoint presentation. Multimedia through the WebPosting your presentation on the Web or in WebCT allows students to review important course concepts on their own. Sounds, images, simulations, and text enable students to learn course concepts from different perspectives and can be integrated in your presentation.Visual LearningPictures grab students' attention and convey some ideas more easily than verbal descriptions. You can illustrate your course content with diagrams, photos, maps, or a variety of other visual resources. Visual resources posted to the Web or in WebCT are also available 24 hours a day, so students who need extra time to review material can access it at their convenience.Auditory LearningUsing sounds in your lectures can stimulate your students. You might want your students to listen to native speakers of a foreign language. By including sound files in your presentation, you will be able to share this information with your students. MERLOT (Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching) – MERLOT is an online educational portal that contains links to over 3700 online learning materials created by college faculty in all subject areas. Peer reviewed materials include past assignments, custom animations, and simulations. All material includes descriptions with details about the online resource and what it offers in terms of classroom usage. You can easily search for good examples of presentations used in courses by using keywords such as “presentation” or “multimedia presentation”. You can also search by subject area or use the extensive help section that offers several tips on finding the information you want. Draw on the screen during a presentationIt can be valuable to be able to draw on the screen during your presentation to illustrate a particular point or item. This can be done in the following way. Press the Ctrl-P key combination to display a pen on the screen. Then, using the left mouse button, draw on the slide as you wish. To erase what you have drawn, press the E key. To hide pen, press the A key or the Ctrl-L key combination.Blank the screenAt times we want the image on the screen to disappear so that the audience is focused solely on the presenter. There are two ways to do this. The first is if you want to blank the screen with a black image, similar to shutting the projector off (we used to do this all the time with overhead projectors by just shutting the projector off). Just press the B key on the keyboard and the image is replaced with a black image. Press the B key again and the image is restored. If you want to use a white image instead of a black image, press the W key each time.Have Slides at the End of Your PresentationThe last slide you speak to should not be the last slide in your presentation file. You should have three identical copies of your last speaking slide so that if you accidentally advance one too many times at the end of your presentation, your audience never knows because you don’t drop into the program, the slide looks like it has not changed. After these slides, you should include some slides that answer questions that you expect to be asked. These slides will be useful during Q&A sessions after the presentation. The final slide should be a blank slide so that if you go through all the other slides, you have a final backup from dropping into the program.
  • Effective power pointseminar

    1. 1. Effective PowerPoint Mary Helen Hendrix IDC Director
    2. 2. Always Keep In Mind Everything is best for something and worst for something else. The trick is knowing what is what, for what, when, for whom, where, and most importantly, why. - Bill Buxton
    3. 3. Agenda • Key Elements • Options for Enhancing Presentations • Additional Resources • Question & Answer
    4. 4. Why Use PowerPoint? • Adaptable • Accessible • Target multiple modalities • Reinforce content • Focus attention on content • Create supplemental materials
    5. 5. Number 1 Rule of PowerPoint Just because you can, does NOT mean you should
    6. 6. Key Elements • Size/Fonts • Transition • Images • Sound • Color • Animation • Hyperlinks
    7. 7. Font Size • Can you read this? (14 pts) • Can you read this? (16 pts) • Can you read this? (18 pts) • Can you read this? (20 pts) • Can you read this? (24 pts) • Can you read this? (28 pts) • Can you read this? (32 pts)
    8. 8. Font Type Serif Font Times Roman, Garamond, Georgia Sans Serif Font Arial, Tahoma, Verdana
    9. 9. Font Personality • Appearance of font gives a certain mood • Meaning of the words are effected by the font
    10. 10. Text Tips • Six words per line • Use numbers sparingly • Three to six points per slide • Limit to twenty words per slide • Do NOT use all caps
    11. 11. 10/20/30 Rule • 10 slides • 20 minutes of talk • 30 minimum font size
    12. 12. Transition Consistency is the Key • Consistent Color Schemes • Consistent formatting • Avoid Distractions
    13. 13. Transition
    14. 14. Images • Reinforce/Expand Content –Example • Replace Text • Use Good Quality • Viewable at a Distance
    15. 15. Image Tips • Maintain balance • Design not decoration • Big, clear, relevant • Left placement leads eye to text
    16. 16. Sound • Support or Extend Content –Example • Issues to consider –Transport with presentation –Use with care, can be distracting
    17. 17. Color • Contrast Text & Background Dark Background with Light Text Light Background with Dark Text Dark Background with Light Text Dark Background with Dark Text Light Background with Light Text Light Background with Light Text
    18. 18. Color • Cool for background Warm for foreground • Dark room: dark background • Light room: light background • Three colors per presentation • Don't use only color to indicate something specific
    19. 19. Color Symbolism • Think of your audience – Cultural – Age – Class – Gender • Example: white Native America: Peace and happiness. China: Death, mourning India: unhappiness Japan: death Eastern: Funerals, mourning Western: Brides, angels, doctors,
    20. 20. Pick the Orange Hat
    21. 21. Consider Color Sensitivity
    22. 22. Consider Color Sensitivity Normal Red/Green Blue/Yellow
    23. 23. Animation Tips • Support, Not Distract • Make Fit Content • No Transition is Just Fine • Multiple Transition Types Annoy
    24. 24. Bad Example Rubbish, Inc Testimonials – Robert Johnson: “I use Rubbish, Inc. for all my rubbish requirements- it’s their professional staff and their famously trashy service that really makes the difference.” – John Robertson: “Without Rubbish, Inc. life is just a sequence of days extending one after another; a giant garbage heap, signifying nothing.”
    25. 25. Animation • Control Order of Appearance –Good for quizzing • Focus Audience Attention • Can be Distracting • Lost when saving as Web page
    26. 26. Hyperlinks • Access supplemental material • Pose and answer questions • Omit slides • Non-Linear presentations
    27. 27. Presentation Tips • To temporarily clear screen press W or B • Tell the truth • Get to the point • Choose the right format for the data • Focus on the important • Keep it SIMPLE
    28. 28. Key Elements Examples • Less Effective Gettysburg Address • More Effective Gettysburg Address
    29. 29. Summary • Communication is the key • Text supports the communication • Pictures simplify complex concepts • Animations for complex relationships • Visuals to support, not to distract • Sounds only when absolutely necessary
    30. 30. Some Final Words • PowerPoint as an aid to presentation, not the presentation • Exterior Content and Interior Content are different • Know your presentation space – execute your gestures and volume accordingly
    31. 31. KNOW WHEN TO STOP
    32. 32. References • Catalyst Teaching: Enhance Presentations: • Addressing Diverse Learning Styles Through the Use of Multimedia • The Making of the Gettysburg PowerPoint Presentation • The Gettysburg PowerPoint Presentation • Ten Secrets for Using PowerPoint Effectively • Color Vision Stimulator
    33. 33. Question and Answer
    34. 34. Supplemental Slides Follow
    35. 35. Are Serif or Sans Serif fonts better for presentations? Answer: Sans Serif fonts
    36. 36. What is the number 1 rule of PowerPoint? Answer
    37. 37. Interesting Acoustic Instruments From the Chrysalis Foundation Chrysalis Harmonic/Melodic Canon Diamond Mirimamba GlassdanceBase Mirimamba
    38. 38. Second Page • Your Text here • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. • Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate velit esse molestie consequat, vel illum dolore eu feugiat nulla facilisis at vero eros et accumsan et iusto odio dignissim qui blandit praesent luptatum zzril delenit augue duis dolore te feugait nulla facilisi.

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