Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Organizational Agility: The Hidden Goal (And Often Missed Opportunity) of Agile Transformation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Organizational Agility: The Hidden Goal (And Often Missed Opportunity) of Agile Transformation

233
views

Published on

Leaders and managers need to think beyond the team and facilitate the emergence of a broader capacity for organizational agility. Such a capacity cannot be managed or regulated into existence; such a …

Leaders and managers need to think beyond the team and facilitate the emergence of a broader capacity for organizational agility. Such a capacity cannot be managed or regulated into existence; such a capacity can only really be catalyzed.

This presentation deck (revised from a presentation given at Agile2012) makes the case for a broader notion of organizational agility, and describes what it's like to manage and lead in ways that catalyze its emergence.

Published in: Business, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
233
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 8/1/13 1 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions ©  2012  BigVisible  Solu1ons   Michael  Hamman   Bob  Fischer   Jim  Elvidge   Organiza1onal  Agility:   The  Hidden  Goal  (and   OHen-­‐Missed   Opportunity)  of  Agile   Transforma1on   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 2 Why Organizational Agility?
  • 2. 8/1/13 2 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 3   Most Agile adoptions focus on the delivery capacity of teams or aggregates of teams. Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions A  Common  PaPern  of  Agile  Teams  Over   Time...   4   Time Performance Teams start off great guns.
  • 3. 8/1/13 3 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions A  Common  PaPern  of  Agile  Teams  Over   Time...   5   Time Performance Then, at some point performance and enthusiasm begin to plateau Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions A  Common  PaPern  of  Agile  Teams  Over   Time...   6   Time Performance Without substantial intervention, those teams can plateau or even begin to decline.
  • 4. 8/1/13 4 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions What is Happening? Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 8   We can fix this ourselves Time
  • 5. 8/1/13 5 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 9   We can fix this ourselves We can influence others to fix this Time Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 10   We can fix this ourselves We can influence others to fix this This is beyond our control Over time, the team confronts things that appear more challenging to improve. Time
  • 6. 8/1/13 6 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Managers that haven’t changed to enable self- organization still attempt to control and coordinate   11   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Staff  Caught  Between  Conflic1ng  Goals   12   Department   Goals   Product  or   Team   Goals  
  • 7. 8/1/13 7 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 13   Exis1ng  processes  have  not  been   reviewed  and  updated  to  support  agility   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions In  other  words,  your  teams  have  hit  an   ins1tu1onal  ceiling.   14   Time Performance Institutional Ceiling
  • 8. 8/1/13 8 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 15   Merely  trying  to  resolve  these   challenges  tac1cally  is  not  sustainable.   There  are  simply  too  many  holes  to   plug.   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 16   In  the  end,  we  need  to  think  about   agility  holis1cally.   (Moving  from  a  team  delivery  focus   toward  an  organiza1onal  learning   orienta1on.)  
  • 9. 8/1/13 9 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 17 In this session we share some tools for thinking and managing holistically. Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 18 What is Organizational Agility?
  • 10. 8/1/13 10 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Working  Defini1on   19   Organiza1onal  agility  is  being  able   to  rapidly  sense  and  effec1vely   respond  to  arising  opportuni1es   and  challenges.   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 20   Sense and Respond
  • 11. 8/1/13 11 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 21   Fostering  organiza1onal  agility  requires   first  that  we  have  a  way  of  sensing  the   whole.     Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions MODEL:  Spectrum  of  Agility  Capabili1es   ©  2010  BigVisible  Solu1ons,  Inc..  All  Rights  Reserved   22   •  Leadership and management styles and beliefs about what constitutes effective leadership and management •  Structures, processes and systems by which work gets done and is organized •  Collective beliefs, perspectives and habits by which people make sense of things •  Product Management/Strategy •  Lean, continuous planning •  Product Development/Delivery •  Multiple Team/Programs •  Kanban •  Scrum •  Automated Testing •  Test-driven Development •  Continuous Integration
  • 12. 8/1/13 12 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Spectrum  of  Agility  Capabili1es   ©  2010  BigVisible  Solu1ons,  Inc..  All  Rights  Reserved   23   Broader organizational agility can be achieved to the degree that agile capability is realized across all five parts of organizational array. Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 24   To  get  bePer  at  seeing  this,  we’ll  want   to  first  re-­‐orient  the  way  we  think   about  the  nature  of  organiza1ons.  
  • 13. 8/1/13 13 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 25   To  do  this,  we  start  by  considering  the   no1on  of  mental  models.   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Our  Mental  Models  Color  Our   Op1ons  For  Working  Within  Organiza1ons     26   Experience  Preferences   Culture   Training   Mood   Photograph provided under Creative Commons License by Veni Markovski Models  
  • 14. 8/1/13 14 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions •  These  mental  models  determine  the  decisions  we   make,  the  plans  we  administer,  the  management   structures  we  put  in  place,  and  the  styles  of   leadership  we  believe  to  be  effec1ve.   •  And  these  mental  models  are  largely  invisible  to  us   27   Mental  Models  Shape  Ac1on   Mental Models And Context Actions Results Shapes Affects Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions The  Cynefin  Framework   From:  Snowden  and  Boone     28   "Cynefin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynefin (accessed October 4, 2011).
  • 15. 8/1/13 15 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions The  Cynefin  Framework    Provides  a  Useful  Perspec1ve  for   Viewing  Organiza1on  and  Leadership   29   Photograph provided under Creative Commons License by Veni Markovski Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Cynefin  model  provides  a   set  of  explicitly  defined   mental  models—or   ‘filters’-­‐-­‐through  which  we   might  produc1vely   observe  and  think  about   organiza1onal   phenomena.   30  
  • 16. 8/1/13 16 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions •  Stability,  liPle  change   •  Clear  cause  and  effect   rela1onships   •  The  right  answer  is  self-­‐ evident,  and  usually   there  is  a  single  right   answer   •  “Known  knowns”   31 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 32  
  • 17. 8/1/13 17 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions •  Rela1onship  between   cause  and  effect  is   there,  but  not  everyone   can  see  it   •  Requires  high  degrees   of  exper1se  and   analysis   •  Mul1ple  right  answers   •  “Known  unknowns”   33   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible SolutionsPhoto provided under Creative Commons by David Villarreal Fernández 34  
  • 18. 8/1/13 18 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible SolutionsPhoto provided under Creative Commons by David Villarreal Fernández 35   An expert engineer can dissemble it and re-assemble it and be able to drive out of the garage. Over and over, again. Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions •  Large  number  of  interac1ng   parts   •  Interac1ons  are  not  always   predictable   •  Behavior  of  the  system   cannot  be  predicted  based   on  behavior  of  the  parts     •  The  history  of  the  system   effects  current  performance   •  Cause  and  effect  can  only   be  perceived  in  retrospect   36  
  • 19. 8/1/13 19 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 37  Photo provided under Creative Commons by wka Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Implica1ons  of  Complex  Systems   •  You  cannot  determinis1cally  predict  how   the  system  will  react  to  a  given  s1mulus     •  You  can  only  understand  the  system  in   retrospect   –  But  the  understanding  is  illusory   •  Solu1ons  cannot  be  imposed  because  there   are  simply  too  many  unknowns   •  Therefore,  complex  organiza1ons  are  best   led  through  a  probe-­‐sense-­‐respond  loop   38  
  • 20. 8/1/13 20 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 39   Though  most  modern   organiza1onal  semngs  are     complex,  most  managers  and   leaders  view  organiza1ons  as   complicated.   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 40   This  is  a  big  problem.  
  • 21. 8/1/13 21 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions You  now  have  the  wrong  filter.    With  the  wrong  filter,  anything   you  do  to  improve  things  will  actually  make  them  worse.   41   Photograph provided under Creative Commons License by Veni Markovski Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions In  trea1ng  organiza1onal   situa1ons  as  complex:   •  Experts  dominate  the   discovery  process   •  This  leads  to   –  Entrenched  thinking   –  Analysis  paralysis   42  
  • 22. 8/1/13 22 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions This,  in  turn,  leads  to  the  Treadmill  of   Compounding  Complica7on   43   New   Processes   and   Structure   Difficult   for  People   to  Follow   Process   Not   Followed    Perceived   Lack  of   Control   Start   Here   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions You  are  now  buried  in  complica1on  that   needs  to  be  that  much  more  ‘managed.’   44  
  • 23. 8/1/13 23 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 45   Many  organiza1onal  situa1ons  are   inherently  complex.   They  cannot  be  regulated  by   tradi1onal  management  approaches.   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Complex organizational situations call for a different approach to leadership and management… 46   A Well Designed Environment Photo provided under Creative Commons by Eugene Chan
  • 24. 8/1/13 24 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 47   …from managing for control Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 48   …to designing for emergence
  • 25. 8/1/13 25 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions In  an  agile  organiza1on,   the  job  of  leadership  and   management  shiHs  from   managing  individuals  and   teams  to  managing,  and   con1nuously  improving,   the  organiza1onal   environments  in  which   individuals  and  teams   operate.   49 Agile   Teams   Organizational Environment Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 50   There  is  a  sensing,  and  there  is   responding  aspect  to  this.  
  • 26. 8/1/13 26 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 51   Sensing Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions The  Sensing  Elements   52   Organiza1on   Structures   Organiza1on   Culture   Leadership   Styles  
  • 27. 8/1/13 27 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions The  Sensing  Elements   53   The organizational structures, rules and policies which facilitate how work gets done and how results get produced. Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions The  Sensing  Elements   54   Collectively held beliefs, values and assumptions which determine how people think and how they behave.
  • 28. 8/1/13 28 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions The  Sensing  Elements   55   How leaders and managers lead, inspire, direct and motivate others. Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Improvement  in  All  Three  Areas   is  the  Job  of  Leadership  and  Management   56   Organiza1on   Structures   Organiza1on   Culture   Leadership   Styles  
  • 29. 8/1/13 29 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 57 Agile   Team   EXAMPLE:  Agile  Team  Sensing:  Start  with  the  team…   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 58 Agile   Team   What  challenges  and  blocks  does  it  run  into?    What   behaviors  do  they  exhibit?   Blocks, impediments, bad behaviors, inefficiencies
  • 30. 8/1/13 30 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 59 Agile   Team   These  are  the  ques1ons  posed  by  a  Management   Team.   Blocks, impediments, bad behaviors, inefficiencies Management   Team   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Rather  than  simply  making  the  problem  go  away,  we   want  to  engage  in  a  form  of  systemic  inquiry.   Systemic Inquiry: Agile   Teams   Blocks, impediments, bad behaviors, inefficiencies Management   Team   How can we better understand, not just the presenting problem or challenge, but the underlying dynamics which that problem or challenge manifests?
  • 31. 8/1/13 31 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions A  Sensing  Elements  frame  helps  us  conduct  such  a   systemic  inquiry  by  helping  us  frame  deeper  ques1ons   about  the  organiza1on.   Systemic Inquiry: Agile   Teams   Blocks, impediments, bad behaviors, inefficiencies Agile   Enablement   Team   How  might  our  thinking   and  leadership  styles  be   impeding  the  capacity  for   effec=ve  agile  delivery,   product  development,   and  organiza=onal   agility?   What  assump=ons,  collec=vely   held  beliefs,  or  percep=ons  of  our   values  are  blocking  our  ability  to   imagine  new  ways  of  working?   What  org.  structures,  rules,  or  policies,   which  once  may  have  been  needed,   have  now  become  boClenecks  to   effec=ve  agile  delivery?   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 62   This constitutes a form of deep organizational sensing.
  • 32. 8/1/13 32 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 63   Responding Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions A  shiH  from  managing   through  direc1ng,   mo1va1ng  and   coordina1ng  people…   64 People  
  • 33. 8/1/13 33 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Organizational Environment …  to  managing  through   design  of  environments.   65 People   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions It  can  be  helpful  to  use   our  organiza1onal  sensing     lens  to  orient  our  design   thinking.   66 Organiza1on   Structures   Organiza1on   Culture   Leadership   Styles  
  • 34. 8/1/13 34 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions A  Simple  Example:   We  Reflect  On  and   Improve  How  we   Work  through   Retrospec1ves   67   Photo provided under Creative Commons by Improve IT Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 68   How might the design of the organizational environment facilitate the emergence of this capability?
  • 35. 8/1/13 35 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 69   Organiza1on   Structures   •  Organiza1onal  support  people   gathering  to  reflect:   •  Team  spaces   •  Collabora1ve  technology   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 70   Organiza1on   Structures   •  Organiza1onal  support  people   gathering  to  reflect:   •  Team  spaces   •  Collabora1ve  technology   Organiza1on   Culture   •  It  is  safe  to  admit  failures   •  There  is  a  constant  drive  for   improvement  
  • 36. 8/1/13 36 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 71   Organiza1on   Structures   •  Organiza1onal  support  people   gathering  to  reflect:   •  Team  spaces   •  Collabora1ve  technology   Organiza1on   Culture   •  It  is  safe  to  admit  failures   •  There  is  a  constant  drive  for   improvement   Leadership  Style   •  Leaders  publicly  reflect  on  their  own   successes  and  failures  –  and  improving   •  Leaders  demonstrate  ac1ve  learning   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 72   Notice how little management (in the traditional, control sense of the term) there is.
  • 37. 8/1/13 37 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 73   Environment Design is a management methodology that facilitates emergence of particular, desired organizational capabilities. Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Environment  Design  as  a  Methodology  for  Building   Organiza1onal  Capability   74   Outmaneuver  the   compe11on  by  implemen1ng   high-­‐value  product  features   faster  than  they  do   Goal  
  • 38. 8/1/13 38 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Environment  Design  as  a  Methodology  for  Building   Organiza1onal  Capability   75   Outmaneuver  the   compe11on  by  implemen1ng   high-­‐value  product  features   faster  than  they  do   Goal   We  are  able  to  experiment   with  new  product  ideas,   quickly  iden1fying  what  is   worth  inves1ng  in  and  what   is  not   Capability   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Environment  Design  as  a  Methodology  for  Building   Organiza1onal  Capability   76   Outmaneuver  the   compe11on  by  implemen1ng   high-­‐value  product  features   faster  than  they  do   Goal   We  are  able  to  experiment   with  new  product  ideas,   quickly  iden1fying  what  is   worth  inves1ng  in  and  what   is  not   Capability   •  Leaders  support  experimenta1on  <L>   •  Fast  failures  are  celebrated  <C>   •  Org  structures  facilitate   experimenta1on  <S>   •  Lean  startup  prac1ces  are  used  <C>   Environment   Design  
  • 39. 8/1/13 39 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 77   Environment Design recognizes that an important dimension of organizational life is complex, and therefore cannot be regulated in the usual manner. Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 78 Such an approach to organizational management calls for something more than just tactical or strategic leadership. It calls for what Bill Joiner and Stephen Josephs call catalytic leadership.
  • 40. 8/1/13 40 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 79 Complicated  vs.  Complex   Complex The relationship between cause and effect can only be perceived in retrospect (most organizational situations) -> Catalytic, experimental methods work best (allow the path forward to reveal itself) -> Follow emergent practices: 1. Probe 2. Sense 3. Respond - But watch for command/control, imposing order MODEL:  Cataly1c  Leadership   From:  Joyner  &  Josephs   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions •  Each  level  reflects  a  greater  capacity  to  deal  with   complexity  and  rapid  change.   •  Each  level  builds  upon,  but  expands  the  range  of   mental  and  leadership  capability  over  the  levels   below   80   Three  Levels  of  Leadership  Agility*   Expert Achiever Catalyst * Bill Joiner, Stephen Josephs, Leadership Agility: Five Levels of Mastery for Anticipating and Initiating Change.
  • 41. 8/1/13 41 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Expert   81   View  of  Leadership   Agility  in  Pivotal   Conversa=ons   Agility  in  Leading   Teams   Agility  in  Leading   Organiza=onal   Change   Tactical, problem solving orientation Believes that leaders are respected and followed by others because of their Authority and Expertise. Style is either to strongly assert opinions or to hold back to accommodate others. May swing back from one style to the other, particularly for different relationships. Tends to avoid giving or requesting feedback. More of a supervisor than a manager. Creates a group of individuals rather than a team. Work with direct reports is primarily one- on-one. Too caught up in the details of own work to lead in a strategic manner. Organizational initiatives focus primarily on incremental improvements inside unit boundaries with little attention to stakeholders. Bill Joiner, Stephen Josephs, Leadership Agility: Five Levels of Mastery for Anticipating and Initiating Change Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Achiever   82   View  of  Leadership   Agility  in  Pivotal   Conversa=ons   Agility  in  Leading   Teams   Agility  in  Leading   Organiza=onal   Change   Strategic, outcome orientation Believes that leaders motivate others by making it challenging and satisfying to contribute to larger objectives. Primarily Assertive or accommodating with some ability to compensate with the less preferred style. Will accept or even initiate feedback, if helpful in achieving desired outcomes. Operates like a full- fledged manager. Meetings to discuss important strategic or organizational issues are often orchestrated to gain buy-in to own views. Organizational initiatives include analysis of external environment. Strategies to gain stakeholder buy-in range from one-way communication to soliciting input. Bill Joiner, Stephen Josephs, Leadership Agility: Five Levels of Mastery for Anticipating and Initiating Change
  • 42. 8/1/13 42 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Catalyst   83   View  of  Leadership   Agility  in  Pivotal   Conversa=ons   Agility  in  Leading   Teams   Agility  in  Leading   Organiza=onal   Change   Visionary, facilitative orientation Believes that leaders articulate an innovative, inspiring vision and bring together the right people to transform the vision into reality. Leaders empower others and actively facilitate their development. Adept at balancing assertive and accommodating styles as needed in particular situations. Likely to articulate and question underlying assumptions. Genuinely interested in learning from divers viewpoints. Proactive in seeking and utilizing feedback. Intent upon creating a highly participative team. Acts as team leader and facilitator. Models and seeks open exchange of views on difficult issues. Empowers direct reports. Uses team development as a vehicle for leadership development. Organizational initiatives often include development of a culture that promotes teamwork, participation, and empowerment. Proactive engagement with diverse stakeholders reflects a belief that input increases the quality of decisions, not just buy- in. From Bill Joiner, Stephen Josephs, Leadership Agility: Five Levels of Mastery for Anticipating and Initiating Change, p. 8. Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions 84 “During the early 1980s, a series of academic studies produced statistically significant correlations, showing that the capacities managers develop at the more advanced stages carry over into the way they exercise leadership. These studies also found that, in the great majority of cases, catalytic managers are more effective than conventional managers. Why? Because they are more strategic in their thinking, more collaborative, more proactive in seeking feedback, more effective in resolving conflicts, more active in developing subordinates, and more likely to redefine problems to capitalize on the connections between them.”   Correlation  of  Stages  to   Managerial  Styles   Source: Bill Joiner, Stephen Josephs, Leadership Agility: Five Levels of Mastery for Anticipating and Initiating Change, pp. viii-ix Correla1on  of  Stages  to  Management  Styles  
  • 43. 8/1/13 43 Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Agile Leadership Principles …   Why  Do  We  Care?   •  There  is  a  rela1vely  low  level  of  cataly1c   behavior  demonstrated  by  managers   –  45%  Expert   –  35%  Achiever   –  5-­‐10%  Catalyst   •  And  yet  there  is  an  increasing  need  for   catalyst  leadership  in  modern  organiza1ons   85   Copyright © 2012 Big Visible Solutions Conclusions   86   •  Leaders  and  managers  need  to  think  beyond  the  team  and   facilitate  the  emergence  of  a  broader  capacity  for   organiza7onal  agility.   •  Such  a  capacity  cannot  be  managed  or  regulated  into   existence;  such  a  capacity  can  only  really  be  catalyzed.   •  By  focusing  on  the  broader  organiza1onal  environment,   managers  find  important  design  points  of  leverage.   •  Managing  through  the  design  of  environments  creates   condi1ons  that  favor  the  emergence  of  par1cular,  desired   organiza1onal  capabili1es  and,  therefore,  behaviors.   •  Managing  for  the  emergence  of  organiza1onal  agility  is  an   inherently  complex  task,  calling  for  a  cataly7c  approach  to   leadership  and  management.