www.h2.ieAdobe ConnectSome Practical ConsiderationsMichael HallissyH2 Learning
www.h2.ieIntroduction• Founding partner in H2 Learning– Focus on the use of digital technologies in teaching, learning and...
www.h2.ieIntroduce Yourself• Name• Lecturing in ….• Have you used Adobe Connect or similartool?– If yes, what tool?• What ...
www.h2.ieSome Perspective• Learning at a distance has been around since 1890s• 1st online OU Course 1988 (Mason, 2001)• “t...
www.h2.ieTechnology and what it can do• “Computer-mediated conferencing (CMC) is unique among distanceeducation media beca...
www.h2.ieHere are some of the strategies we could useonlinehttp://www.ion.uillinois.edu/resources/tutorials/pedagogy/instr...
www.h2.ie3 Elements of Online Learning & TeachingContentForumSCMC
www.h2.ieNew Opportunities• Immediate and just-in-time access to peers, lecturers,and knowledge experts• Ability for multi...
www.h2.ieSynchronous Learning Environments“Synchronous learning is live, real-time (and usuallyscheduled), facilitated ins...
www.h2.ieWere they engaged during these sessions?
www.h2.ieOr were they watching TV or something else?
www.h2.ieStudents are NOT always clear why they areattending these events?Purpose of the tutorial PercentageOpportunity fo...
www.h2.ieAdobe Connect
www.h2.ieTypical Features of SCMC technologiesEmoticonsHands upYes NoControlsChat boxSlides
www.h2.ieOnline Lecture• Allows you to connect live at adistance• Allows you to interact with youraudience in real-time• A...
www.h2.ieShare Rich Content• PowerPoint Slides• Video and audio• Webpages• Documents– Research papers, correspondence etc....
www.h2.ieInstructionInput and outputtasksLecture to manyLecturer as teller,organiser, judgeLecturer controls„time & pace‟ ...
www.h2.ieBut it can be so much more …• Unplanned chats among peers over lunch• Lively in-class discussions or debates• Stu...
www.h2.ieConstructionIndividuals, pairs,groupsLecturer as enquirerLong time blocks,student-pacedStudent experience aresour...
www.h2.ieCo-constructionChanginggroups,networks,linkagesLecturer aslearner tooTime seen asless relevantAccess toworld ofre...
www.h2.iePotential roles for lecturers and learnersWhenteachers: Facilitate ConsultInstruct GuideLearnersbecome: Involved ...
www.h2.ieWhat the Research has to say“Instructors who are new to the online environment maystruggle with the transition fr...
www.h2.ieAnalogy of a dinner party hostPrepare for their arrival Have resources ready in advanceWhen they arrive you can f...
www.h2.ieWhere might you start?• How you can build interaction into the session - you dont wantpeople sitting at their com...
www.h2.iePractical Tips• Ensure they have the technology– Headphones– Microphone• Get people to acknowledge they can hear ...
www.h2.ieInteraction Tools• Use of questioning– Check in with learners regularly and get feedback via emoticons?– “Can eve...
www.h2.ieYour Role in all this• If tutor is too enthusiastic the students “slip easily into therole of passive audience” (...
www.h2.ieSilence• Be aware that silence is a factor– Speaking into a vacuum– Wait-time (learning to leave gaps)One lecture...
www.h2.ieSo design your lectures online• Remember it is one tool among many• It is good at facilitating certain types of i...
www.h2.ieSome Final Words• This is relatively new in online education– Asynchronous has a long tradition• “Mediated synchr...
www.h2.ieReferences• Bernard, R. M., Abrami, P. C., Borokhovski, E., Wade, C. A., Tamim, R. M., Surkes, M. A. andBethel, E...
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Adobe Connect: Some Practical Considerations

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This presentation was made as part of a webinar with faculty in the Institute of Technology in Tallaght. The presentation shared some theoretical and practical issues that lecturers should consider when using synchronous computer mediated conferencing (scmc) technologies, such as SCMC, with their learners.

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  • Key point is that the technology or the medium is not going to determine the quality of learningOkay you select a good product/tool but it is how you use it that counts – the lecturer is key in using the tool
  • Key is there is interaction and the tutor plans in advance what and how they want to achieve during the tutorial."Support is a crucial element for retaining and motivating learners". Nothing works better when a learner is in trouble that a "live exchange with the right person"
  • research around online learning highlights the need for students to be actively engaged in creating their own knowledge (Salmon, 2008; Hrastinski, 2009; van Alst and Hill, 2001)
  • InstructionCollaborationSupportSocialisation and informal exchangeExtended outreach
  • The active construction of knowledge by learners through a process of real-time give-and-take is well-served in a live online setting (Finkelstein, 2006)The notion of Collaboration - "Collaboration is a key element to the success of an online learning environment (Conrad and Donaldson, 2004)No matter what technology we employ, it is still the human experience that is most important. Students learn from teacheres, their peers, and knowledge experts. No one learns from a computer" (Kimura, 2002)
  • Good practice gives prompt feedback(Chickering and Gamson, 1987)
  • Adobe Connect: Some Practical Considerations

    1. 1. www.h2.ieAdobe ConnectSome Practical ConsiderationsMichael HallissyH2 Learning
    2. 2. www.h2.ieIntroduction• Founding partner in H2 Learning– Focus on the use of digital technologies in teaching, learning andassessment• Former director the MATL in Hibernia College– Lead tutor in the Certificate in i-Learning• Completing EdD in Institute of Education, London• Doctoral Thesis entitled:• "Building teacher professionalism in teaching-learning interactionsbetween online tutors and learners during synchronous tutorials –a case study from Hibernia College"• Focus on working with lecturers to use these tools to enhancestudent learning– What knowledge and expertise do staff have?– What knowledge and expertise do they need to enhance student learning?
    3. 3. www.h2.ieIntroduce Yourself• Name• Lecturing in ….• Have you used Adobe Connect or similartool?– If yes, what tool?• What would you like to learn from today?
    4. 4. www.h2.ieSome Perspective• Learning at a distance has been around since 1890s• 1st online OU Course 1988 (Mason, 2001)• “the internet does not educate, nor does it actively support learning.Mostly, it provides information” (Laurillard, 2012; 29)• OU noted that “active discussion has long been one of the aspects that isdifficult to provide in distance education, with tutorials and summer schoolsbeing the usual means of achieving this” (Mason, 2001; 73)• Since 1988 there has been a great deal written on the topic of discussionand online courses in HE but this has mostly focused on asynchronoustechnologies – forums particularly.• But today we have new tools that facilitate live discussion
    5. 5. www.h2.ieTechnology and what it can do• “Computer-mediated conferencing (CMC) is unique among distanceeducation media because of its ability to support high levels of responsive,intelligent interaction between and among faculty and students whilesimultaneously providing high levels of freedom of time and place toengage in this interactivity.” (Rourke et al., 1999; 50)• “The claims made for the educational value of CMC rest on the assumptionthat students learn effectively through discussion and collaboration”(Laurillard, 2002; 147)– She notes that “the properties of a medium do not determine the quality oflearning that takes place” (Ibid;147)Now we have:• Synchronous Computer-mediated conferencing technologies (SCMC)– Adobe Connect, Wimba, Elluminate, Lync etc.
    6. 6. www.h2.ieHere are some of the strategies we could useonlinehttp://www.ion.uillinois.edu/resources/tutorials/pedagogy/instructionalstrategies.asp
    7. 7. www.h2.ie3 Elements of Online Learning & TeachingContentForumSCMC
    8. 8. www.h2.ieNew Opportunities• Immediate and just-in-time access to peers, lecturers,and knowledge experts• Ability for multiple people to interact and share ideaswith one another concurrently• Hands-on tools through which learners can react topresented concepts or apply knowledge in real time• Direct connections to real-world situations and primarysources(Finkelstein, 2006; 6)
    9. 9. www.h2.ieSynchronous Learning Environments“Synchronous learning is live, real-time (and usuallyscheduled), facilitated instruction and learning-orientedinteraction.”(Hyder et al., 2007: p. 1)
    10. 10. www.h2.ieWere they engaged during these sessions?
    11. 11. www.h2.ieOr were they watching TV or something else?
    12. 12. www.h2.ieStudents are NOT always clear why they areattending these events?Purpose of the tutorial PercentageOpportunity for tutor to present newcontent57%Opportunity for tutor to revise contentpresented in the recorded lesson93%Opportunity for students to raisequestions and discuss the lessoncontent100%Opportunity for students to work insmall groups online20%Opportunity for students to presenttheir work to colleagues21%
    13. 13. www.h2.ieAdobe Connect
    14. 14. www.h2.ieTypical Features of SCMC technologiesEmoticonsHands upYes NoControlsChat boxSlides
    15. 15. www.h2.ieOnline Lecture• Allows you to connect live at adistance• Allows you to interact with youraudience in real-time• Allows you to bring “experts” or“guest lectures” into your lecturehall• Facilitates webinars – openthem up to everyone• It can be archived and replayedhttp://www.iri.uni-hannover.de/online-lecture.html
    16. 16. www.h2.ieShare Rich Content• PowerPoint Slides• Video and audio• Webpages• Documents– Research papers, correspondence etc.• Interactive whiteboard feature– Brainstorming• And much more
    17. 17. www.h2.ieInstructionInput and outputtasksLecture to manyLecturer as teller,organiser, judgeLecturer controls„time & pace‟ seenas keyLecturer chosenresourcesWatkins et al., 2002
    18. 18. www.h2.ieBut it can be so much more …• Unplanned chats among peers over lunch• Lively in-class discussions or debates• Student-led presentations or performances• Study group, team, or committee gatherings• Impromptu exchange between a student and a lecturer after classor during office hours• Timely and personalised guidance from a reference librarian,advisor, or a lecturer(Finkelstein, 2006; 3)
    19. 19. www.h2.ieConstructionIndividuals, pairs,groupsLecturer as enquirerLong time blocks,student-pacedStudent experience aresourceTasks for processingand understandingWatkins et al., 2002
    20. 20. www.h2.ieCo-constructionChanginggroups,networks,linkagesLecturer aslearner tooTime seen asless relevantAccess toworld ofresourcesTasks ofgeneratingknowledgeWatkins et al., 2002
    21. 21. www.h2.iePotential roles for lecturers and learnersWhenteachers: Facilitate ConsultInstruct GuideLearnersbecome: Involved Self-DirectedDependent Interested
    22. 22. www.h2.ieWhat the Research has to say“Instructors who are new to the online environment maystruggle with the transition from the central figure in thelearning process to a facilitator or guide of that process.”(Palloff and Pratt, 2011)
    23. 23. www.h2.ieAnalogy of a dinner party hostPrepare for their arrival Have resources ready in advanceWhen they arrive you can focus on these and oncollaborationWelcome them warmly Welcome people by nameCreate a warm and secure environmentFrequently assess the mood of the room Frequently check that people are alrightDon‟t wait till the end of the eveningHave more food (for thought) than you need Prepare more activities that you needDon‟t feel you need to use them allMake everyone feel included Give people opportunities to interactRefer to comments made by people by nameFacilitate Connections and conversation, but don‟tdominate ever discussionYour role is to facilitate an environment where learnersare exchanging ideas with others, and seeing theirpeers as resources for ongoing learningOffer guests something to take home with them Provide a transcript or a recording of the eventAccess to slides, readings or continue the discussionon the forumKnow when to say good night; leave everyone wantingmoreEnd on a high point. Don‟t try to cover everything.Monitor the energy levels and go with the group.
    24. 24. www.h2.ieWhere might you start?• How you can build interaction into the session - you dont wantpeople sitting at their computer all evening looking at the screen sohow might you get them involved?• Dont fall into the "autopilot" mode where you forget students arepresent.• Get learners to concentrate by minimising external distractions– Have ground rules and use the emoticons• Role of the facilitator similar to that of the ringmaster in the circus– You need to keep things focused and moving– It needs structure– Gauge feedback
    25. 25. www.h2.iePractical Tips• Ensure they have the technology– Headphones– Microphone• Get people to acknowledge they can hear you• Have clear ground-rules– This is what we are going to do …– This is what I will be doing …– This is what I expect from you …• If people have questions how can they interact with you andcolleagues?• How will you get people to interact?– Use the poll feature– Texting feature– They can speak through the microphone– What about shy or quiet students? “Will you just click-in on them?”
    26. 26. www.h2.ieInteraction Tools• Use of questioning– Check in with learners regularly and get feedback via emoticons?– “Can everyone hear me?” Smiley or Sad face– “Is x clear or do you want me to go deeper? “ Thumbs up or down– Groups– Strategies to give learners a chance to interact with each other– This can be done in break-out groups or via texting– Structuring discussions and feedback• Mix of Resources– Maybe begin with a short video clip (stimulus to engage)– Share a webpage or a document– Share a research or a newspaper article– Mix it up – use a variety of media– Have clear tasks associated with these media
    27. 27. www.h2.ieYour Role in all this• If tutor is too enthusiastic the students “slip easily into therole of passive audience” (Brookfield and Preskill, 2005;194)• “Teachers should confine themselves to a reasonablequota of lecturing minutes per class, preferably at thebeginning or the conclusion of a class.” (ibid; 200)• What do you want to achieve at the end of the session?• How might you introduce new content or ideas and getsome discussion or interaction going?• It takes time and there is a learning curve – how can you setyourself up to succeed?• Be conscious that this is new and it can be daunting!
    28. 28. www.h2.ieSilence• Be aware that silence is a factor– Speaking into a vacuum– Wait-time (learning to leave gaps)One lecture‟s reflection on this:“I had absolutely no experience of it previously the first time I put onthose headphones and said hello or good evening I was absolutelyterrorised [nervous laughter]”“I was pleasantly surprised it all happened much much easier than Ithought and so I think the strongest thing I found is that my teachingskills are, or if you like my onsite classroom teaching skills, I was ableto call on once I just got over the first hurdle of actually doing thisonline.”
    29. 29. www.h2.ieSo design your lectures online• Remember it is one tool among many• It is good at facilitating certain types of interactions– it is not a silver bullet• Novice online – it takes to be comfortable• How will it dovetail with face-to-face?• How will it link with with Moodle etc.?• Keep it simple and structure it– Not that you have every second accounted for– But that you don‟t have to do all the work– Manage the time
    30. 30. www.h2.ieSome Final Words• This is relatively new in online education– Asynchronous has a long tradition• “Mediated synchronous and blended DE contains naturalconditions for interaction, especially between the studentand teacher and among other students.” (Bernard et al.,2009)• Tutor View– “I feel that I am using the technology that I know how to use to itsmaximum and so now if I could move a bit deeper”– “But I would love if the technology would allow us to move evenfurther. That is where I am at, at this stage.”• Participate as a learner in an online event
    31. 31. www.h2.ieReferences• Bernard, R. M., Abrami, P. C., Borokhovski, E., Wade, C. A., Tamim, R. M., Surkes, M. A. andBethel, E. C. (2009). A Meta-Analysis of Three Types of Interaction Treatments in DistanceEducation. Review of Educational Research, 79 (3), 1243-1289.• Finkelstein, J. (2006). Learning in Real Time: Synchronous Teaching and Learning Online. SanFrancisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.• Johnson, S. D. and Aragon, S. R. (2003). An Instructional Strategy Framework for Online LearningEnvironments. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 100 (Winter), 31-43.• Mason, R. (2001). Effective facilitation of online learning: the Open University experience. In J.Stephenson (Ed.), Teaching and learning online: New pedagogies for new technologies. London:Kogan Page.• Laurillard, D. (2002). Rethinking University Teaching: A conversational framework for the effectiveuse of learning technologies. (Second Ed.). London and New York: Routledge Falmer.• Laurillard, D. (2012). Teaching as a Design Science. Building Pedagogical Patters for Learning andTechnology. New York and London: Routledge.• Rourke, L., Anderson, T., Garrison, R. D. and Archer, W. (1999). Assessing Social Presence inAsynchronous Text-based Computer Conferencing. Journal of Distance Education, 14 (2), 50-71.• Watkins, C., Carnell, E., Lodge, C., Wagner P. and Whalley C. (2002). Effective Learning. Instituteof Education International Network for School Improvement Research Matters Series (17).

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