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GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
GLS 2010 Presentation
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GLS 2010 Presentation

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  • 1. Ludic Constructivism Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 1
  • 2. An Epistemological Approach to Why and How We Learn in Computer Games 1. The “killer-game” paradox 2. Three-identity model 3. Radical constructivism 4. Ludic construction of knowledge 5. Why we play and what we learn 6. Five principles of game based education 7. Best practice example Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 2
  • 3. The “Killer-Game” Paradox Scientific evidence seems to suggest: • Digital games promote learning all the good stuff - Social competencies, etc. • Digital games do not promote learning all the bad stuff - Violence, etc. Lack of consistency?! Lack of a proper learning theory? Lack of a proper epistemological position? Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 3
  • 4. Three-Identity Model Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 4
  • 5. Radical Constructivism Ernst von Glasersfeld: • There is no reality independent of the observer. • Knowledge is constructed by creating mental models that are validated with our senses. Heinz von Förster: • Observer and observed cannot be separated. • Mental models of reality are the result of a recursive process linking first and second order observation (second order cybernetics). • Reality is replaced by the eigenvalue of this recursion. Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 5
  • 6. Three-Identity Model Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 6
  • 7. Ludic Construction of Knowledge Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 7
  • 8. Why we play and what we learn 1. Play is a consequence of self-awareness and self- awareness is a consequence of play. - Huizinga: cultural anthropological game theory 2. The main purpose of playing is to train the knowledge creation process within a safe environment. - Winnicott: developmental psychological game theory 3. Games are not particularly well suited for learning content, their main potential is learning about learning. 4. The knowledge created during gameplay is only relevant to game space initially. Any transfer into real space requires an “active induction”. Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 8
  • 9. Five Principles of Game Based Education 1. Being educational is never a property of the game itself. 2. Game based learning experiences do not automatically have real world effects. 3. Learning with digital games is fundamentally social and highly individualized. 4. In general, there are no economies of scale in game based education. 5. Game based teaching requires basic “psychotherapeutic” competencies. - Teaching = coaching Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 12
  • 10. Best practice example: AugmentedEDU Physics game themed around clean energy production. Core development principles: 1. Educational objectives closely linked to game mechanics 2. Focus on knowledge creation 3. Multiple possibilities to interface with non-game real world activities 4. Iterative didactic design process integrating teachers and students Department für Bildwissenschaften Fachbereich Applied Game Studies Univ.-Prof. Dr. Michael G. Wagner, MBA 13
  • 11. (Digital) Games promote what they demand, and they demand what players want. www.appliedgames.at

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