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NSGIC 2011 Presentation on geo open source
 

NSGIC 2011 Presentation on geo open source

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Presentation on "Open Source Possibilities" for geospatial to NSGIC 2011 annual conference in Boise, ID. Presented by Michael Terner, AppGeo and Learon Dalby, Sanborn.

Presentation on "Open Source Possibilities" for geospatial to NSGIC 2011 annual conference in Boise, ID. Presented by Michael Terner, AppGeo and Learon Dalby, Sanborn.

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    NSGIC 2011 Presentation on geo open source NSGIC 2011 Presentation on geo open source Presentation Transcript

    • Open Source
      Possibilities
    • Viable Option?
      June 15-16, 2011
    • Viable Option?
      June 15-16, 2011
      Yes
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Mapping Ecosystem
      http://goo.gl/bBm2pcredit to @spara (Sophia Parafina, Infochimps)
    • Viable Option?
      June 15-16, 2011
      Yes
    • Viable Option?
      June 15-16, 2011
      Yes
    • Reasons
      *Cited in Open Technology Development, Department of Defense 2011
    • Need should drive architecture / software solution.
      Not
      Architecture / software solution = Result
    • Overview
      One question: How many of you believe you’ve heard “more” about open source for GIS recently?
      • If yes, speculate on why
      • Open source business proposition
      • Opportunities
      • Challenges
      • What some states are doing
    • We’re number 2?
      • Directions podcast from 1/31/11 posed the question
      “Podcast: Are Esri and Open Source Solutions the Only Options?”
      AdenaSchutzberg & Joe Francica discussed state of the market in response to a reader’s comment
      • There is increased maturity of the tools
      • There is an emerging business ecosystem
    • We’re number 2!!!Not an accident that we’re hearing more about it now
      • It’s being put to use in high profile, meaningful ways
    • So what is this business ecosystem?
      • Paul Ramsay educates us on the business of OSS
      Senior employee of OpenGeo
      One of the key authors of the PostGIS software
      • Geospatial info in the database
      • Kind of like an open source SDE/Oracle Spatial
      Brilliant person and excellent public speaker who puts it out there in plain terms
      Several of the following slides were presented at the recent FOSS4G conference, and are used with permission
    • What is open source software?
      Managed as a project with a team of contributors
      Source code of software is freely available
      Software license often allows free deployment
      Slides from Paul Ramsay, used with permission.
    • The beekeeper analogy
      Slides from Paul Ramsay, used with permission.
    • “Creates a virtuous circle”
      Slides from Paul Ramsay, used with permission.
    • Open source and proprietary software companies are similar, but different
      Open Source Corp
      Proprietary Corp
      They both need to serve customers and make money
      The intellectual property comes from different places
      Slides from Paul Ramsay, used with permission.
    • There are now companies that provide support and services for geospatial OSS
      OpenGeo is following the “Red Hat model”
      Insurance: That if something is broken, some entity will help get it fixed; you can obtain support
      Assurance: That there is knowledge and expertise to assist you with deploying and solving problems with these tools
      Slides from Paul Ramsay, used with permission.
    • Many commercial companies employ open source
      Google
      Linux in its web farms
      Amazon
      The Xen virtual machine environment
      85 of 135 third-party libraries are OSS
      Under 18 different OSS licenses
      Slides from Paul Ramsay, used with permission.
    • Opportunities
      Scalability
      Was crucial for the National Broadband Map
      Slides from Paul Ramsay, used with permission.
    • Opportunities
      Release cycles
      New features can be added more quickly
      Learon’s/DoD’s point: “Agility/Flexibility/Faster Delivery”
      You can pay for a feature
      Incremental improvements through releases
      10.0
      9.0
      8.0
      Versions
      7.0
      6.0
    • Challenges
      Meaningful quote at the conference:
      “Free is the least important word in FOSS4G”
      (FOSS4G = Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial)
      Free does not mean that there are no costs
      You can/should pay for support
      There are costs in training staff
      Etc.
    • Challenges
      Picking your tools
      It’s a large marketplace
      Server, desktop, DB, client framework, caching, ETL, etc.
      Many projects
      Many companies
      What do you need?
      How does it all fit together?
    • So what’s going on with FOSS4G in the NSGIC community?
      Massachusetts, Oklahoma and New Jersey
      Any others?
      Three questions
      What are you doing?
      Why did you do it?
      Any advice to offer?
      PS: None of these states has abandoned Esri
    • Massachusetts
      What are you doing?
      Powers OGC compliant web services
      Including consumable public services consistent with state’s overall services oriented architecture
      Consumed by wide variety of public and agency applications
      Including Oliver & Morris, public facing viewers
    • Massachusetts
      Why did you do it?
      Adopted OGC API over 10 years ago
      In 2001, ArcIMS was not up to task of affordably publishing 100+ OGC compliant map services
      Have viewed OSS as a supplement, not a replacement for Esri technology
    • Massachusetts
      Any advice to offer?
      Support exists, but finding it and becoming familiar with the new model takes some time
      Ensure you have access to adequate technical support via consultants and/or staff for configuration and deployment
    • Oklahoma
      What are you doing?
      Powers the OKMaps clearinghouse
      Catalog, data viewer, consumable OGC web services
    • Oklahoma
      Why did you do it?
      Reduce licensing costs
      Original project was grant funded, no budget for maintenance
      Ability to “clone this clearinghouse” and provide to counties so they can help feed the state system
      Not yet, however
    • Oklahoma
      Any advice to offer?
      “Although one may avoid licensing costs, there are still significant costs”
      Need for staff expertise
      Good professional partner
      OSS is under constant development, important to stay current on releases
    • New Jersey
      What are you doing?
      OGC web services (WMS, WFS) to power a variety of agency applications & Publish data to The National Map
      Web application front-end is OpenLayers; backend is EsriArcGIS Server REST/cached base map
      OGC compliant orthophoto services
      Via a LizardTech Express Server
    • New Jersey
      Why did you do it?
      Fill in some gaps in the Esri product offerings
      Robust OGC support
      JavaScript development before release of REST API
      Supplement existing Esri infrastructure
      Comfortable with a heterogeneous environment
    • New Jersey
      Any advice to offer?
      When you venture into OSS, understand the release cycle and model
      Daily builds are available and sometimes have something you want
      But can be less stable
    • Conclusion
      It’s continuing to mature
      Quality of tools
      Business ecosystem
      It’s adding value
      To both government and business
      We’re likely to be seeing more of it, not less
    • Questions?
      Michael Terner
      mgt@appgeo.com
      @MT_AppGeo
      LearonDalby
      ldalby@sanborn.com
      @learondalby