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Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks

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Presentation at COMET-ENVISION workshop on Future Media Distribution Networks Nov. 10-11 2011, Slough, UK.

Presentation at COMET-ENVISION workshop on Future Media Distribution Networks Nov. 10-11 2011, Slough, UK.

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  • 1. SCALABLE VIDEO CODING IN CONTENT-AWARE NETWORKS Michael Grafl Institute of Information Technology Alpen-Adria Universität Klagenfurt, Austria COMET-ENVISION workshop on Future Media Distribution Networks Nov. 10-11 2011, Slough, UKMichael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 1
  • 2. OUTLINE Introduction ALICANTE  Project Overview  Conceptual Architecture  Comparison to ICN Use Cases for SVC in CAN (Analysis wrt. ICN research challenges)  Unicast  Multicast  P2P Streaming  Web/HTTP Streaming Step-by-Step Walkthrough Conclusions Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 2
  • 3. INTRODUCTION Information-Centric Networking (ICN)  Revolutionary approach Content-Aware Networking (CAN)  Evolutionary approach  ALICANTE project Scalable Video Coding (SVC)  Extension of H.264/MPEG-4 AVC  Spatial, temporal and quality (SNR) scalability  Base layer + multiple enhancement layers  Coding overhead: ~ 10% wrt. H.264 Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 3
  • 4. ALICANTE Project Info:  EU FP7-ICT project  Duration: March 2010 – Aug 2013  20 partners "Media Ecosystem Deployment through Ubiquitous Content-Aware Network Environments" Goal: New Home-Box layer and CAN layer with distributed cross-layer adaptation and universal multimedia access enabling cooperation between providers, operators, and end-users http://ict-alicante.eu Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 4
  • 5. ALICANTE CONCEPTUAL ARCHITECTURE User Environment: devices and end user User Environment Context- aware Service Environment: content and services Service Environment HBHB HB HB HB Layer: networkedContent- Home-Box Layer components as overlay HB Network- aware aware MANE MANE CAN Layer: in-network CAN CAN CAN MANE MANE components as overlay CAN CAN CAN Physical Layer: AS AS AS autonomous systems Network Environment Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 5
  • 6. ALICANTE VS. FULL ICN APPROACH  Evolutionary approach for FI (Mid-way to full ICN)Approaches:  Caching and storage Best effort  In Home-Boxes (network edge) QoS-based virtual splitting and Content Servers Content-aware networks  Scalable and Cost-Efficient  Content-type awareness Content Distribution ALICANTE Service-aware networking  Name/location resolution – approach Full ICN at Service level (not in routers)  Content/object awareness  Content-awareness  Name/location  aggregated CA and associated resolution, routing of processing at network level requests, caching at network nodes  Deployment Degree of awareness on upper layer information at network level  Seamless/incremental deployment Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 6
  • 7. USE CASES FOR SVC IN CAN Role of scalable media formats for enabling content-aware networking Unicast, Multicast, Peer-to-Peer Streaming, Web/HTTP Streaming Analysis wrt. ICN research challenges:  Routing & Forwarding  Caching & Buffering  Quality of Service/Experience (QoS/QoE) Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 7
  • 8. SYSTEM OVERVIEW FOR USE CASES S1 Mobile R1U1 ICNN2 ICNN1 R2U2 HD-Ready TV Buffer Buffer S2 R3 SVC-Base LayerU3 Full-HD TV Enhancement Layer 1 Enhancement Layer 2 Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 8
  • 9. USE CASES: UNICAST Example: Video on Demand (VoD) RTP (with SST of SVC) and RTSP Routing & Forwarding:  ICN node can react to network fluctuations • In-network adaptation of SVC at ICN node (for short-term fluctuations) • Signal to sender for dropping SVC layers (for long-term fluctuations) Caching & Buffering:  ICN node can perform prefix caching • Reduce start-up delay • Selective caching of SVC layers QoS/QoE: (applies to all use cases)  Consider terminal capabilities when requesting SVC layers  Monitor network conditions at ICN nodes (cf. ALICANTE)  Smooth, undistorted playout Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 9
  • 10. USE CASES: MULTICAST Receiver-Driven Layered Multicast (RDLM) of SVC RTP in MST mode (each SVC layer in own session) Routing & Forwarding:  ICN nodes adapt to network conditions through subscription to SVC layers  ICN nodes as bridges between native and overlay multicast (ALICANTE: virtual content-aware network of ICN nodes)  Selective treatment of SVC layers (MPLS, DiffServ) Caching & Buffering:  Prefix caching to reduce start-up delay in non-live scenarios Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 10
  • 11. USE CASES: P2P STREAMING Receivers request pieces from multiple senders P2P network as overlay Receiver only requests SVC layers supported by end-user terminal Routing & Forwarding:  ICN nodes can act as peers, forming an in-network overlay Caching & Buffering:  Aggregate requests and perform information-centric buffering (during sliding window) at ICN nodes Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 11
  • 12. USE CASES: WEB/HTTP STREAMING Download via HTTP (partial) GET requests  Content fragmented into segments (e.g., per SVC layer and GOP)  Manifest file describes structure of segments and available representations  Standard: Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) Overcome NAT traversal & firewall issues Stateless sender Unicast, multicast, and multisource (P2P-like) scenarios Routing & Forwarding:  ICN node signals network condition to receiver (implicit adaptation) Caching & Buffering:  SVC-based prefix caching using HTTP-based CDN infrastructure  Buffering during sliding window creates multicast tree  Information-centric buffering in multisource scenario Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 12
  • 13. STEP-BY-STEP WALKTHROUGHAVC 8decoding AVC decoding 6 Source 7 9 1 5 HB SVC to AVC transcoding HB HB SVC 2 encodingSVC to AVCtranscoding 4 3 MANE CAN MANE 2nd SVC Adaptation 1st SVC Adaptation at MANE at MANE HB Source Stream Base Layer (AVC) Enhancement Layer 1 Enhancement Layer 2 Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 13
  • 14. CONCLUSIONS Towards ICN: Scalable media coding formats (e.g., SVC) in combination with in-network adaptation  Routing & Forwarding  Caching & Buffering  QoS/QoE Enabling content-awareness within the (core) network Context-awareness at receiver & sender (& ICN node) ALICANTE  Towards deployment of a networked "Media Ecosystem"  Collaboration of CAN layer and Home-Box layer Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 14
  • 15. LITERATURE[1] J. Pan, S. Paul, R. Jain, “A survey of the research on future internet architectures”, IEEE Communications Magazine, vol.49, no.7, pp.26-36, July 2011.[2] V. Jacobson, D. Smetters, J. Thornton, M. Plass, N. Briggs, R. Braynard, “Networking named content”, Proc. of ACM CoNEXT 2009, Rome, Italy, December 2009.[3] H. Koumaras et al., “Media Ecosystems: A Novel Approach for Content- Awareness in Future Networks,” Future Internet: Achievements and Promising Technology, Springer Verlag, pp. 369-380, May 2011.[4] ALICANTE Web site, http://ict-alicante.eu/.[5] M. Wien et al., “Performance Analysis of SVC,” Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 17, no. 9, pp. 1194-1203, 2007.[6] T. Stockhammer, “Dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP – standards and design principles,” in Proceedings of the Second Annual ACM Conference on Multimedia Systems, New York, NY, USA, pp. 133–144, February 2011.[7] M. Grafl, et al., “Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks: Research Challenges and Open Issues,” in: N. Blefari-Melazzi, G. Bianchi, and L. Salgarelli (eds.), Trustworthy Internet, Springer, pp. 349-358, June 2011. Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 15
  • 16. THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION! Questions?Michael Grafl Scalable Video Coding in Content-Aware Networks 16