Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Perceptions Of Hispanic Offenders Toward Reentry Programs
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Perceptions Of Hispanic Offenders Toward Reentry Programs

702
views

Published on

This is an overview of the literature review of my thesis that I presented at a national conference

This is an overview of the literature review of my thesis that I presented at a national conference


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
702
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PERCEPTIONS OF  HISPANIC OFFENDERS  TOWARD REENTRY  PROGRAMS Marisa Moggio Southeast Missouri State University
  • 2. INTRODUCTION   The Bureau of Justice Statistics reported in  December 2007 that there are 2,293,157  prisoners being held in federal or state prisons or  local jails.   The proportion of offenders returning to federal  prison within 3 years increase from11.4% in 1986  to 18.6% in 1994 (Bureau of Justice Statistics)  BJS reported in 2007 of the 2,293,157 prisoners:  3,138 Black male prisoners per 100,000 Black males  1,259 Hispanic male prisoners per 100,000 Hispanic  males  481 White males prisoners per 100,000 White males
  • 3. HISTORY OF REENTRY   During 1800s, prisoners served a determinate  amount of time in very crowded prisons.  In the 1900s, inmates began serving  indeterminate sentences which began to focus on  the rehabilitation of the inmates.  Parole board began to emerge in many states.   Indeterminate sentencing and parole boards  collapsed in the late 1970’s, early 1980s  (Petersilia, 2003).   During 1980s and 1990s, “get tough” policies  were implemented along with mandatory  sentencing and truth­in­sentencing laws. 
  • 4. REENTRY PROGRAMS  Petersilia (2003) defined reentry programs as “all  activities and programming conducted to prepare  ex­convicts to return safely to the community and  live as law abiding citizens” (p.3).   Travis et al. (2001) defined reentry as a process  with programs and activities that aid the  prisoner in the reentry process.   Seiter & Kadela (2003) explained reentry  programs specifically focus on the transition from  prison to community and/or initiate treatment in  a prison setting and link with a community  programs to provide continuity of care. 
  • 5. IN­ PRISON REENTRY PROGRAMS  Some reentry programs are offered inside prison.   According to Austin (2001), “While incarcerated,  inmates can participate in limited number of  programs that are designed to assist them in  enhancing their ability to succeed upon release”  (p.323).   However the participation rate of reentry  programs inside prison are declining.   Lack of inmate participation is linked to small,  unorganized and ill suited in­prison programs. 
  • 6. POST­RELEASE REENTRY  PROGRAMS  Petersilia (2004) indicated the ultimate goal of  reentry programs is reintegration, which clearly  includes more than remaining arrest­free for a  specified period time.   Effective reentry programs address education  and employment issues along with substance  abuse treatment.   Listwan, Cullen & Latessa (2006) emphasized  that reentry programs cannot focus solely on  educating offenders, but rather reentry programs  should help offenders understand the  consequences of their behavior and help them  develop alternatives. 
  • 7. REENTRY PROGRAMS  Researchers argued correctional programs should  focus their attention on high risk offenders.    Serious Violent Offender Reentry Initiatives  (SVORI)  Bouffard & Bergeron (2006) concluded the reentry  program successfully reached the targeted population  and increased community relations between the  offenders and society.   Reentry Courts   Basile (2002) proposed implementing reentry courts  that closely monitor the offender’s progress and also  meeting the need for public safety while providing  needed services to the offender. 
  • 8. DEMOGRAPHICS  An estimated 600,000 inmates are returning to  communities around the United States (Lynch &  Sabol, 2001; Petersilia, 2003; Travis et. al, 2001).   The majority of ex­prisoners are mostly male,  minority, and unskilled (Petersilia, 2003).  Race is a critical dimension when discussing  reentry.  Petersilia (2003) indicated, “About one­third of  parole entrants are white, 47 percent are black  and 16 percent are Hispanic, hence about two­ thirds of all returning prisoners are racial or  ethnic minorities” (p. 26). 
  • 9. HISPANICS  According to the Census Bureau website, in 2006,  the Hispanic population grew to around  44,321,038 which constitute 15% of the total  population.  According the Bureau of Prison website, they  incarcerate 200,148 inmates and of those 31.2%  are Hispanic.  17% Mexican, 1.6% Dominican Republic, and 1.5%  Columbian.   Petersilia (2003) stated, “In terms of inmates in  prison, Hispanics represent the fastest growing  minority group” (p. 26). 
  • 10. PROBLEMS INMATES FACE WITH  REENTRY  Substance Abuse   Durose & Mumola (2006) surveyed prisoners about  their substance abuse issues and reported 66%  indicated they had been using drugs during the  month prior to their offense and 25% stated they  were dependent on alcohol prior to entering prison.   Petersilia (2003) explained, “We do know that the  vast majority of prison inmates with substance abuse  problems do not receive treatment in prison” (p. 47).   Without proper substance abuse treatment inside  prison, returning offenders have trouble resisting  temptation or kicking their habit. 
  • 11.  Physical and Mental Illness  Petersilia (2003) emphasized, “By any indicator,  prison inmates and releasees are less healthy—both  physically and mentally—than the population at  large” (p. 34).   Hammett (2001) reported, “nearly one quarter of all  people living with HIV or AIDS, one third living with  Hepatitis C, and one third with TB in the United  States in 1997 were released from a correctional  facility that year (p. 302).   Petersilia (2002) explained, “Even when public  mental services are available, many mentally ill  individuals fail to use them because they fear  institutionalization, deny they are mentally ill, or  distrust the mental health system” (p. 369). 
  • 12.  Education  Visher et al. (2003) reported that the highest level of  education the majority of respondents had prior to  entering prison was 10th and 11th grade.   Vacca (2004) emphasized that educational programs  need to teach inmates to read effectively, but also  provide reinforcement that helps promote successful  transition back into society.   Bedard, Eschholz & Gertz (1994) indicated the  importance of having correctional education respond  to the needs of different ethnic groups. 
  • 13.  Employment  Travis et al. (2001) stated, “Studies have shown that  having a job with decent wages is associated with  lower rates of offending” (p. 31).  Petersilia (2001) suggested that incarceration is  stigmatizing and that there is reluctance among  employers to hire ex­offenders.   Along with employers not wanting to hire ex­ offenders out of fear, is the fact that they are legally  banned from working in certain fields.    Visher et al. (2003) conducted a study of inmates  preparing for reentry and reported only 30% of  respondents currently had a job in prison. 
  • 14.  Family Connections  Reintegration can be a stressful time and many  offenders will turn to their family for support.  Visher & Travis (2003) indicated, “Strong ties  between prisoners and their families or close friends  appear to have a positive impact on post release  success” (p. 99).   La Bodega de la Familia (the family grocery)  According to Shapiro & Schwartz (2001), La Bodega de la  Familia has been testing the proposition that strengthening  families of substance abusers under supervision can  improve success of treatment.   La Bodega de la Familia targets each family’s strengths  which can be brought to the surface to assist in offender’s  reentry. 
  • 15. MY PLAN  The purpose of this case study is to explore the  perceptions of Hispanic inmates and correctional  personnel regarding reentry programs inside the  prison.   The research questions that will guide this study  are:  1. What are the perceptions of Hispanic offenders  regarding reentry programs?  2. What are the perceptions of the correctional  personnel regarding the impact of reentry programs  on Hispanic inmates? 
  • 16. METHOD  This study will utilize a case study approach.  A case study is a “strategy of inquiry in which  the researcher explores in depth a program,  event, activity, process, or one or more  individuals” (Creswell, 2009, p. 13). 
  • 17. POPULATION AND SAMPLE  Non­probability sampling  The sample will be obtained from one of the  Bureau of Prisons (BOP) facilities.  For this study a Federal Correctional Institution  (FCI) that is located in the Midwest has been  chosen.  It houses approximately 1,278 male offenders.   The participants will be selected from Hispanic  inmates participating in reentry programming  inside the prison  The second sample will be selected from  correctional personnel who teach reentry  programs. 
  • 18. DATA COLLECTION AND  INSTRUMENTATION   The data will be collected by the researcher.   The qualitative data will be obtained through  semi­structured, open­ended, face­to­face  interviews with Hispanic inmates and  correctional personnel at the FCI.   An interview schedule has been developed from  the emergent themes of the literature review.   The interviews will be conducted in English or  Spanish, which ever the participant prefers.   The interview will be tape recorded and  transcribed verbatim
  • 19. DATA ANALYSIS  A copy of the research proposal will be forwarded  to the Human Subject Committee.    Upon the approval of the committee, the  interview will be conducted.  The tape recordings will be transcribed verbatim  and the researcher will identify emergent themes  from the transcriptions.   In order to organize and access emergent themes  from the transcriptions, the findings will be  imported in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.