Need For Change Powerpoint

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This PowerPoint presentation serves as a Call to Action for American educators in light of our ever-growing global economy and "flattening" of the world.

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Need For Change Powerpoint

  1. 1. For which century are you preparing your learners?<br />Now Is the Time for Change in American Education<br />
  2. 2. “Our Nation is at risk. Our once unchallenged preeminence in commerce, industry, science, and technological innovation is being overtaken by competitors throughout the world.” <br />A Nation at Risk, April, 1983, http://www2.ed.gov/pubs/NatAtRisk/risk.html<br />
  3. 3. It has been 27 years since we first received this call to action for the American people. But what have we done since then?<br />
  4. 4. Are we asking our students to travel back in time each time they come to school?<br />Welcome to<br />1980!<br />Or traverse oceans to understand our global competitors and colleagues?<br />
  5. 5. What does it take to motivate us to change? <br />Think of a change you’ve made in the last five years—personally or professionally. Write it down.<br />What led you to make the change?<br />List the steps it took you to make the change?<br />What kind of support did you need to make the change? From where did you get the support?<br />Have you been able to sustain the change? If so, how? If not, why?<br />Adapted from Leading Change in Your School: How to Conquer Myths, Build Commitment, and Get Results by Douglas B. Reeves, 2009, ASCD<br />
  6. 6. What does it take to motivate us to change? <br />It took September 11, 2001, to get us to look more seriously at security measures.<br />It has taken global warming to get us to worry about recycling.<br />How far behind in the global economic race does America have to fall before we figure out what to do to catch up?<br /> Change<br />Knowing<br />Doing<br />
  7. 7. The future ain’t what it used to be. ~Yogi Berra<br />
  8. 8. “Curriculum” <br />From the Latin meaning, “a path to run in small steps”<br />Where is our path taking our students? <br />
  9. 9. What Is the Value of Education? <br />Consider the following statistics from the U. S. Department of Labor and Census Bureau: <br />College graduates made an average of $51,554 in 2004. Those with advanced degrees made $78,093.<br />Adults with a high school diploma made $28,645<br />High school dropouts averaged $19,169<br />http://www.learnmoreindiana.org/needtoknow/Pages/Valueofeducation.aspx <br />
  10. 10. What Is the Value of Education? <br />75% of future jobs are likely to want employees with at least a license or certificate. <br />Occupations that require a bachelor&apos;s degree are projected to grow the fastest, nearly twice as fast as the national average for all occupations.<br />http://www.learnmoreindiana.org/needtoknow/Pages/Valueofeducation.aspx <br />
  11. 11. What Is the Value of Education? <br />On average, a college degree is worth an extra $23,000 a year.<br />$23,000 x 40 years = $920,000<br />http://www.learnmoreindiana.org/needtoknow/Pages/Valueofeducation.aspx <br />
  12. 12. Educators must understand . . . <br />Global economic trends and perspective<br />China, India, and Japan represented 18% of the world’s gross domestic product in 2004. That figure is expected to reach 50% of the world’s GDP within 30 years. <br />One in five U.S. jobs is tied to international trade and increasing. <br />Over 400,000 U.S. income tax returns were processed in India last year. <br />Teachers need a deep understanding of the interconnectedness and interdependence of all human beings—cultural knowledge; linguistic abilities.<br />Multiple sources, including Curriculum 21: Essential Education for a Changing World edited by Heidi Hayes Jacobs, 2010, ASCD; Catching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization by Yong Zhao, 2009, ASCD<br />
  13. 13. Educators must understand . . . <br />Science and technology trends<br />Technology and automation of jobs is taking over the labor market, saving employers salaries and benefits. <br />Jobs are being moved to the worker, such as the case with Jet Blue airlines using at-home workers for reservations. <br />34% of doctoral degrees in natural sciences and 56% of engineering PhDs in the U.S. are awarded to foreign-born students.<br />In how many classes is keyboarding, typing a paper in Word, and creating a Powerpoint presentation considered peak technology implementation? <br />Multiple sources, including Thomas Friedman in his 2005 speech at MIT; “Jobs and the Skills Gap” by Willard R. Daggett; Catching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization by Yong Zhao, 2009, ASCD<br />
  14. 14. Is our educational system “broken”?<br />3 in 10 college freshman repeat high school courses.<br />Catching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization by Yong Zhao, 2009, ASCD<br />
  15. 15. Is our educational system “broken”?<br />1.2 million students drop out of high school every year—a student drops out every 26 seconds. <br />Catching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization by Yong Zhao, 2009, ASCD<br />
  16. 16. Is our educational system “broken”?<br />70% of 8th-graders can’t read at grade level. <br />Catching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization by Yong Zhao, 2009, ASCD<br />
  17. 17. Is our educational system “broken”?<br />America’s high school graduation rate ranks 19th in the world. Forty years ago, we were first. <br />Strong American Schools, 2008<br />
  18. 18. The greatest tragedy in America is not the waste of our natural resources. The real tragedy is the waste of our human resources.~Oliver Wendell Holmes<br />
  19. 19. 13 Principles of Change<br />1. Decide with data, not opinions.<br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  20. 20. 13 Principles of Change<br />2. Enlist passionate people who see the possibilities.<br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  21. 21. 13 Principles of Change<br />3. Focus on fluency in literacy.<br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  22. 22. 13 Principles of Change<br />4. Grow staff through professional learning.<br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  23. 23. 13 Principles of Change<br />5. Hold teams accountable for learning results.<br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  24. 24. 13 Principles of Change<br />6. Inspire innovative instruction—instruction matters more than structure. <br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  25. 25. 13 Principles of Change<br />7. Join with the community to form true partnerships. <br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  26. 26. 13 Principles of Change<br />8. Know your students, know your strengths, no excuses.<br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  27. 27. 13 Principles of Change<br />Live lofty expectations. <br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  28. 28. 13 Principles of Change<br />10. Measure learning by proficiency.<br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  29. 29. 13 Principles of Change<br />11. Nurture positive relationships.<br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  30. 30. 13 Principles of Change<br />12. Offer multiple pathways to achievement.<br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  31. 31. 13 Principles of Change<br />13. Prioritize the curriculum—less is more. <br />“The Process of Change—Why Change, What to Do, and How to Do It” by Dr. Richard Jones, International Center for Leadership in Education, 2008<br />
  32. 32. “We are confident that the American people, properly informed, will do what is right for their children and for the generations to come.”<br />A Nation at Risk, April, 1983, http://www2.ed.gov/pubs/NatAtRisk/risk.html<br />
  33. 33. Consider yourself “properly informed.”<br />What will you do with the information?<br />What do we need to cut, to keep, and to create to prepare our learners for the century in which they will live?<br />
  34. 34. I’d Like to Teach the World to Think<br />Educational Change . . . It’s the real thing.<br />
  35. 35. A Call to Action<br />by <br />Meredith Hairell<br />University of Houston--Victoria<br />

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