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Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
Libr 430 Week 8
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Libr 430 Week 8

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  • 1. LIBR 430 WEEK 8 Synthesizing Legal Information
  • 2. Analogies &amp; Distinctions <ul><li>Case comparison is based on the premise that like cases should be decided in like manner </li></ul><ul><li>Making valid predictions involves drawing analogies from similar cases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Similar issues, possibly fact patterns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Applicable reasoning &amp; policy statements </li></ul></ul>
  • 3. When Reasoning, Discussing and Writing <ul><li>Demonstrate that the case is binding legal authority </li></ul><ul><li>Assure the reader that the facts you’re comparing were key facts in the decided case </li></ul><ul><li>Give reader enough information to make independent comparison </li></ul>
  • 4. Analyzing Multiple Cases <ul><li>Multiple cases might address a particular issue but with many different variations </li></ul><ul><li>Precedents oftentimes has different fact patterns to client’s case and one another with different results </li></ul><ul><li>Goal: Reconcile diverse results and advise client on the predicted outcome </li></ul>
  • 5. Synthesis <ul><li>Purpose – to find collective meaning in cases </li></ul><ul><li>Rules of law are clarified through multiple cases </li></ul><ul><li>Involves more than listing cases </li></ul>
  • 6. When to Synthesize <ul><li>No express definition of an element </li></ul><ul><li>Rule not expressly stated </li></ul><ul><li>Definition is vague </li></ul><ul><li>Cases analogized don’t address all the determinative facts </li></ul><ul><li>Several cases are all relevant in some way </li></ul>
  • 7. <ul><li>Cannot fully understand a rule of law from just one case </li></ul><ul><li>After reviewing several cases, communicate the standards the court will apply </li></ul><ul><li>Collective legal proposition more important than a list of case briefs </li></ul>Why Synthesize
  • 8. Synthesis is a Common Process <ul><li>We synthesize information daily </li></ul><ul><li>Creating a chart may help, especially if it is a complex issue </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesis can be a difficult skill that requires practice </li></ul>
  • 9. <ul><li>Neighbor ignores a sign warning trespassers to keep out and enters Mr. Jones&apos; land to smell his award winning roses. </li></ul><ul><li>Held: Neighbor liable for trespass </li></ul>Example
  • 10. Neighbor ignores a sign warning trespassers to keep out and enters Mr. Jones&apos; land seeking to escape a mob of angry bees. Held: Neighbor not liable for trespass.
  • 11. Neighbor ignores a sign warning trespassers to keep out and enters Mr. Jones&apos; land seeking to escape a swarm of angry bees. While evading his pursuers, neighbor accidentally tramples on Mr. Jones&apos; award winning roses. Held: Neighbor liable for damages to roses.
  • 12. What do the Three Cases Stand for Collectively? A. Neighbor ignores a sign warning trespassers to keep out and enters Mr. Jones&apos; land to smell his award winning roses. Held: Neighbor liable for trespass. B. Neighbor ignores a sign warning trespassers to keep out and enters Mr. Jones&apos; land seeking to escape a swarm of angry bees. Held: Neighbor not liable for trespass. C. Neighbor ignores a sign warning trespassers to keep out and enters Mr. Jones&apos; land seeking to escape a swarm of angry bees. While evading his pursuers, Neighbor accidentally tramples on Mr. Jones&apos; award winning roses. Held: Professor Berry liable for damages to roses.
  • 13. Look for the Common Threads <ul><li>In each case, Neighbor was trespassing on someone’s land without permission, but the results were different </li></ul><ul><li>The decision maker considered different factors to modify the rule. </li></ul>
  • 14. How? <ul><li>The proposition in the first case is that a person is liable for trespass if they enter someone’s land without permission </li></ul>
  • 15. How? <ul><li>The second case modifies the rule established in the first case. A person is relieved of liability from trespass when it is necessary to protect oneself from physical danger. </li></ul>
  • 16. How Cont’d. <ul><li>This case refines the rule further. When someone trespasses out of necessity, they are still liable for any actual damage to the property. </li></ul>
  • 17. Sample Chart No, but liable for property damage Yes Yes C. Yes No No Yes B. Yes Yes No No A. Yes Liable for Trespass Property Damage Necessity Trespass
  • 18. What’s the collective meaning? <ul><li>&amp;quot;A person who enters the land of another without permission is liable for trespass except where entry is necessary to avoid physical danger, in which case a person is liable only for actual damage to the property.&amp;quot; </li></ul>
  • 19. Using the Factors <ul><li>Identifying the factors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Factors – categories of facts the court considers to decide an issue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Elements are conditions that must be present, but factors are guidelines the court will consider </li></ul></ul>
  • 20. First, Find the Common Threads <ul><li>Identify the common threads in the cases </li></ul><ul><li>Look for patterns that explain the holding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A particular fact </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Combination of factors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Policy considerations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Once locate pattern, easier to locate the factors </li></ul></ul>
  • 21. After Locating Common Threads <ul><li>Tie the common threads together </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The synthesized rule should reflect the different cases, definitions, limitations and exceptions, in a coherent statement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Organize your analysis around the common threads, not the individual cases </li></ul><ul><li>Apply synthesized rule to facts on hand </li></ul>

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