Lecture 3 - Games and Programming
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Lecture 3 - Games and Programming

on

  • 861 views

Ofsted (2009) and others report that the ‘making things happen’ strand of the ICT National Curriculum is often taught less effectively than other areas of the subject in schools beyond the ...

Ofsted (2009) and others report that the ‘making things happen’ strand of the ICT National Curriculum is often taught less effectively than other areas of the subject in schools beyond the Foundation Stage, and many groups and individuals, now seek ways to improve this provision.

In this lecture we explore some of the ways for using interactive computer simulations, including computer games, within the primary classroom, looking at arguments both for and against game based learning. We look to at the ‘gamification’ of some aspects of education at school. Your tutor explores some of the parallels between computer gaming and programming and you are introduced to the Scratch programming environment which makes it easy for children to create simple animations and games of their own.
In Session Task

You have opportunity to play a number of computer games. Write a Blogfolio post reflecting on the place of games in primary education.
Work with a partner to create a scripted animation or simple game in Scratch. Upload this to Blogfolio with comments on your experience of the process of creating this.

To Follow Up

Listen to either Williamson (2009)

Flash Animation

or read Resnick (2007).

Post a critical reflection on your chosen article to your blog.

You may wish to do more work on the development of your animation
or game, or to explore more of what you can program using Scratch,
which may be downloaded from http://scratch.mit.edu

Statistics

Views

Total Views
861
Views on SlideShare
602
Embed Views
259

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0

3 Embeds 259

http://blogfolio.org.uk 256
https://twitter.com 2
http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Lecture 3 - Games and Programming Lecture 3 - Games and Programming Presentation Transcript

  • Learning and Teaching with ICT Year 2, Lecture 3 February 2012
    • Pupils should be taught…
    • how to plan and give instructions to make things happen [for example, programming a floor turtle, placing instructions in the right order]
    • to try things out and explore what happens in real and imaginary situations [for example, trying out different colours on an image, using an adventure game or simulation].
    • Pupils should be taught…
    • how to create, test, improve and refine sequences of instructions to make things happen and to monitor events and respond to them [for example, monitoring changes in temperature, detecting light levels and turning on a light]
    • to use simulations and explore models in order to answer 'What if ... ?' questions, to investigate and evaluate the effect of changing values and to identify patterns and relationships [for example, simulation software, spreadsheet models].
    • Unit 1F. Understanding instructions and making things happen
    • Unit 2D. Routes: controlling a floor turtle
    • Unit 3D. Exploring simulations
    • Unit 4E. Modelling effects on screen
    • Unit 5E. Controlling devices
    • Unit 6C. Control and monitoring - What happens when...?
    bit.ly / qcaict
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    • Your IT curriculum focuses on teaching how to use software, but gives no insight into how it’s made.
    • One of the things you hear from the businesses is that 'I don’t just want people who are literate in technology, I want people who can create programs.’ I think that is a real wake up call for us in terms of our education system and we are acting on that.”
    • The narrowness of how we teach children about computers risks creating a generation of digital illiterates
  •  
  •  
    • Decomposition
    • Pattern recognition
    • Abstraction
    • Algorithms
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •