Innovation and professional development - Y3 L7

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  • 1. Y3 BA PRIMARY EDUCATION2012-2013ICT AND A FOUNDATION SUBJECTLECTURE 7INNOVATION ANDPROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT
  • 2. REFLECTIONS ONJOHNSON ET AL 2012
  • 3. Have developed a positiveattitude towards newdevelopments in technology andshow a willingness to takeresponsibility for your owncontinuing professionaldevelopment in this area
  • 4. BYODVLEGAMESGPSANALYTICSINNOVATIONTRANSFER
  • 5. SMART PHONES
  • 6. FROM VLE TO LP
  • 7. VIDEO GAMES
  • 8. Data Mining4Matrixcalculates comprehensive measures of Within School Variation• provides measures of the effectiveness of learning in every teaching group• supports a headteachers grading on teaching as required by 2009 inspections• converts low-level data into high level commentaries• reveals performance comparisons to contrast with CVA adjusted values• enables a school to easily carry out its own research and analysis into pupil performance• supplies the tools to raise standards and promote pupil achievement• delivers the metrics needed to support assertions in the SEF
  • 9. ROBINSONSOMEKHLUCKINHARGREAVESON INNOVATIONIN EDUCATION
  • 10. ROBINSON 2011
  • 11. SOMEKH 2007Attempts to use ICT in ways thattransform pedagogy and learning arestrongly constrained by factorsbeyond participants controlIn an education system driven byhigh-stakes assessment the mosteffective mechanism for introducingan innovative course is to tie it to anew examinationThere is very strong evidence thatinnovations in pedagogy can beintroduced rapidly if they are tied tochanges in what is assessed.
  • 12. LUCKIN ET AL 2012• different technologies can improve learning by augmenting and connecting proven learning activities• this potential will only be realised through innovative teaching practice.• we found relatively little technological innovation in some of the more effective learning themes• many efforts to realise the potential of digital technology in education have made two key errors: they have put the technology above teaching and excitement above evidence
  • 13. THE KNOWLEDGECREATING SCHOOLThe tinkering teacher is anindividualised embryo of institutionalknowledge creation. When suchtinkering becomes more systematic,more collective and explicitlymanaged, it is transformed intoknowledge creation…Transfer is difficult to achieve for itinvolves far more than telling orsimply providing information…This is most easily achieved when ateacher tinkers with informationderived from anothers professionalpractice. Hargreaves (1999)
  • 14. SERVER FREE3D PRINTINGGESTURESMAKINGCRITICAL DIGITAL LITERACIESOERTMINEXT BIGTHINGS
  • 15. SERVER-FREE
  • 16. 3D PRINTING
  • 17. GESTURES
  • 18. MAKING
  • 19. CRITICAL DIGITAL LITERACY
  • 20. OER
  • 21. TMI
  • 22. Identify examples of innovativepractice in how ICT is used in yourchosen foundation subject. Who arethe leading practitioners in the use ofICT in this subject?
  • 23. In what ways does ICT enableteachers to take responsibilityfor their development asprofessionals?
  • 24. APPRENTICESHIPPATTERNS
  • 25. TRAINEES ASINNOVATORSThere was only limited evidence of trainees beingable to act as significant change agents in schools.School contexts and cultures in relation to ICTwere more frequently described as moderatingfactors than as enablers with regard to supportingICT innovation. They were more likely to beassociated with inhibiting the transfer of practicethan with supporting trainees to innovate.Schools’ willingness to accommodate newapproaches was a key factor in terms of impact.Where trainees were able to share new ideas andapproaches with peers and school colleagues,they appeared to be able not only to develop theirown practice but also to change schools’ views ofICT.
  • 26. STANDARDS
  • 27. THE CASE FORCHANGECollaborative professionaldevelopment is morestrongly associated withimprovements in teachingand learning... [it] appearsmore likely to producechanges in teacherpractice, attitudes or beliefsand in pupil outcomes.
  • 28. THE IMPORTANCE OFTEACHINGWe know that teachers learn best formother professionals and that an openclassroom culture is vital...Too much professional developmentinvolves compliance with bureaucraticinitiatives rather than working withother teachers to develop effectivepractice...Two thirds of all professionaldevelopment is passive learning -sitting and listening to a presentation.
  • 29. TEACHING AS ADESIGN SCIENCETeachers acting as design scientistswould observe four basic precepts, to1. keep improving their practice,2. have a principled way of designingand testing improvements in practice,3. build on the work of others,4. represent and share their pedagogicpractice, the outcomes they achieved,and how these related to the elementsof their design.
  • 30. SOCIAL LEARNING
  • 31. BUILDING YOUR PLN“An important part of learning is to buildyour own personal learning network - agroup of people who can guide yourlearning, point you to learningopportunities, answer your questions, andgive you the benefit of their ownknowledge and experience.” Tobin, 1998
  • 32. SUPPORT COMMUNITIESNaace www.naace.co.ukMirandanet mirandanet.ac.ukCAS computingatschool.org.ukVital vital.ac.ukIctopus www.ictopus.org.ukTES community.tes.co.uk/forums/22.aspxEdugeek www.edugeek.net www.osiriseducational.co.uk
  • 33. ONLINE NETWORKS www.osiriseducational.co.uk
  • 34. FOR NEXT WEEKCome with your work from yourFoundation Subject…