Renaissance sculpture
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Renaissance sculpture

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New version of Renaissance but in a separate section and including images.

New version of Renaissance but in a separate section and including images.

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  • 1. Renaissance Sculpture Revision
  • 2. Renaissance Sculpture • The discovery of the nature and the human body were more important than the imitation of Antiquity. • The polychromes, the gilding and the various techniques employed emphasize the pictorial quality of the works. • An innovation was that the artist was no longer content to be a mere craftsman, but he had the mission of adorn. • Sculpture and painting are going to be together many times. • Projects were important in cities such as Florence were competitions were hold when they had to command an important work, as in the case of the Doors of the Baptistery.
  • 3. Renaissance Sculpture • During the Quattrocento there is an intention to define an idealized, perfect bur naturalistic representation of the human body. • The novelty is the concept of beauty embodied by youth, whereas the gerontocracy in power strove to relegate the young and adolescent to the sidelines of social life. • The sculptures have three characteristics: – Gothic tradition – Renewal of Antiquity – Resource to the single point of view that underlines frontality.
  • 4. Renaissance Sculpture • Tomb sculpture. – The wall tomb was the favourite framework used by the Renaissance sculpture. – The backed tombs were contaminated by the successive forms taken by altarpieces: the recess was surrounded by statuette aligned vertically on the pilasters. – Artists adopted a tripartite structure, contrasting the central arcade, which emphasized the image of the deceased with lateral niches containing statues of saints or virtues. – The development of the representation of the dead denoted a new conception of the portrait. Depiction of faces was often dictated by the concept of the ideal
  • 5. Renaissance Sculpture • Tomb sculpture. – The wall tomb was the favourite framework used by the Renaissance sculpture. – The backed tombs were contaminated by the successive forms taken by altarpieces: the recess was surrounded by statuette aligned vertically on the pilasters. – Artists adopted a tripartite structure, contrasting the central arcade, which emphasized the image of the deceased with lateral niches containing statues of saints or virtues. – The development of the representation of the dead denoted a new conception of the portrait. Depiction of faces was often dictated by the concept of the ideal
  • 6. Renaissance Sculpture • The portrait – The art of medallist developed – They tended to specify and define the natural features of an individual, with attention to physiognomy and its psychological bearing, and without forgetting the course of the time. – Female portraits implied a searching focus on the beauty of woman, and inspired the artist to a celebration of beauty, with a softer and more tender treatment.
  • 7. Renaissance Sculpture • Nude – There is a predominance of male nudes. They follow the Gothic tradition. – Female nudes appear in small bronze statues, imitating the antique statuary. – Male nude kept the workshops especially busy. – Some of the models are those made by Michelangelo: Bacchus and, later on, David.
  • 8. Renaissance Sculpture • Mannerism – Works oscillated between the fantastic and the maniera (following the example of Michelangelo) – Sometimes the ideal took preference – Powerful images opposed to elongated weightless ones – Undulating spirals animated groups and twisted sinuous bodies – Exaggerated expression to the point of morbidity and the bizarre was preferred – Instead of being a sign of decadence, the diversity shows an art in search of itself.
  • 9. Renaissance Sculpture • Materials and technique – Bronze substituted other precious materials. It was casted and finished by chisel. At the beginning it was not highly polished – Extensive use of marble and fine calcareous stones – Details of images are sometimes gilded – Backgrounds can be coloured
  • 10. Renaissance Sculpture • Authors and examples: – Ghiberti: Doors of the Baptistery in Florence (East Doors and Paradise Doors)
  • 11. Renaissance Sculpture Donatello: David, Condottiero Gattamelata
  • 12. Renaissance Sculpture – Michelangelo: (Terribilita) Pieties, David, Medici’s Tombs
  • 13. Renaissance Sculpture
  • 14. Renaissance Sculpture
  • 15. Renaissance Sculpture • Mannerism: – Materials: stucco, a mix of plaster, lime and sometimes powdered marble is well suited for modelling. – The search for effect was often concentrate on polychrome sculpture. – Fountains appear combining sculpture with the effects of water. – In tombs marble and bronze are the main materials. – Artists were itinerant, attracted by rulers to their courts.
  • 16. Renaissance Sculpture – Mannerism: • Cellini: Perseus
  • 17. Renaissance Sculpture • Berruguete: Toledo’s Choir stalls
  • 18. Renaissance Sculpture • Leoni: Charles V’s portraits