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Eating healthy on the Road
 

Eating healthy on the Road

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  • Water is usually free, so here is a way to really save since soft drinks and tea can cost upwards of $2.00 if there are free refills.It is hard to determine how many empty calories you have consumed in a sugar-sweetened beverage when they are constantly refilled. Interestingly, a recent study showed that people who drink water instead of artificially-sweetened beverages tended to make better food choices. Be especially cautious with alcohol served with meals. A glass of wine is typically about 120 calories, but specialty drinks like cocktails, daiquiris, margaritas, etc. have other ingredients and mixers added that can really increase the calories. Choose something low calorie and practice what you learned about savoring the flavor. The biggest drawback is the temptation, once you’ve had a drink, to throw caution to the wind! Alcohol may increase your appetite too.
  • What are some restaurants that fit the title of Southern cooking? (Cracker Barrel, Roy Rogers, and other family style restaurants)

Eating healthy on the Road Eating healthy on the Road Presentation Transcript

  • Lesson from a series of 8 classes:
  • Americans Are Eating OutMore and Cooking Less• Average personeats more than 4meals per weekprepared awayfrom home.
  • The Challenges• Fat, fat everywhere!• Portions are large• Loads of sodium• Focus on meat• Fruits andvegetables few andfar between
  • Do You Suffer From“Portion Distortion?”According to the National RestaurantAssociation’s Dinner Decision MakingStudy, most consumers rank portionsize as one of the 10 “hallmarks of agreat place to eat.”
  • Calorie Difference: 165 Calories250 Calories20 ounces85 Calories6.5 ouncesThings have changed….20 Years Ago Today
  • Portion Choices
  • 1520 calories111 g fat66% of calories are fatSource: Men‟s Health 20 Worst Foods in AmericaWorst BurgerCarl‟s Jr. Double Six Dollar Burger
  • 1,145 calories71 g fatRuby Tuesday Bella Turkey BurgerWorst "Healthy" BurgerSource: Men‟s Health 20 Worst Foods in America
  • Watch out for misleading informationon some restaurant nutrition websites!CABOT AGED CHEDDAR & MUSHROOM BURGERServing Size(g) 245g Servings 2Calories 600 Calories from Fat 360Total Fat 40gSaturated Fat 16gTrans Fat 2gCholesterol 120mgSodium 910mgTotal Carbohydrates25gDietary Fiber 2gSugars 2gProtein34gSource: http://www.unos.com/kiosk/nutritionUnos.html (UNO Chicago Grill)
  • Can You Achieve Your NutritionGoals and Still Eat Out?
  • Survival Strategy #1Know what you want before you go in.• Call ahead for the menu –decide what you will eatwhen you are not hungry.• Don‟t consider othermenu items once you getthere.• Order before others toavoid changing yourmind.
  • Survival Strategy #2Don‟t be afraid to special order.• Ask if specialpreparationrequests arepossible• Request items onthe side orremoved• Pay attention tomenu descriptionsMay I have thefish grilled, please?
  • Beware of these high-caloriemenu descriptions:• Fried, deep fried• Sautéed in oil or butter• Crispy• Creamy• Batter-dipped• Cheese sauce• Golden brown• Au gratin• Creamed• Alfredo sauce“A little more butterwill make it tasteeven better...”
  • Opt for these lower-caloriepreparations:• Grilled• Broiled• Stir-fried• Blackened• Light wine sauce• Broth (soups)• Low-fat or fat-freesalad dressing ormayonnaise
  • Survival Strategy #3Curb a ravenous appetite.• Eat light snack (100-200 calories)1 hour before meal if extremely hungry:– Fruit or whole grain crackers with a protein.• Curb your appetite at the restaurant:– Drink water with lemon.– Eat broth-based soup.– Start meals with salad(light dressing) instead of bread
  • Salad Tips• Good choices - fresh vegetables,fruits, beans.• Limit salads with mayonnaise ---coleslaw, potato salads and pastasalads.• Go easy on cheese, eggs, nuts andcroutons.• Skip bacon bits.• Dress the salad with vinegar, lemonjuice or low-calorie dressings.• To eat, use the „dip and stick‟ method.
  • • Let it slow down your eating pace• The perils of the bottomless beverage• Caution: alcohol and calories– Limit or greatly reduce your intake.– Choose lower calorie options.– Does the pleasure justify the calories?– No nutritional value.– Pour small amounts, savor the flavor– “Uninhibiting” effect  “what the heck”Survival Strategy #4Drink water with your meal.
  • • Share food with diningcompanions.• Divide large entrees inhalf.– Add salad or soup,if needed.• Order appetizers,soups, salads in placeof entrees.Survival Strategy #5Consider the portion size.
  • • Plan to takeleftovers home.• Ask for a take-homecontainer when thefood arrives. Fill itbefore you eat.• Ask if smallerportions areavailable:– Kiddie/junior size– Lunch size
  • Survival Strategy #6Pack a meal from home occasionally.• Healthy “planned-overs”• Lower-calorie frozen entrees• Made-ahead soups and stews• Fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables• Salads with reduced calorie dressing• Potatoes or sweet potatoes with toppings• Know the benefits of brown bagging– Controlled portions– Healthier– Cost-efficient– Time for exercise
  • Steak/Seafood/Southern CookingRestaurants• Forego the appetizer .• Limit bread.• Choose smallest steak possible – leanest cuts includefilet and sirloin….OR• Choose grilled fish or chicken (small portions).• Watch portion size of potatoes (think size of fist).• Order steamed or grilled veggies – request withoutbutter or sauce.• Choose boiled seafood over fried.• Limit mayo-based seafood dips(each little cup is 2 T. – mostly mayo @100 calories per T.)
  • • Skip the hushpuppies, cornbread andbiscuits or have just one….not one ofeach.• Consider having a vegetable plate -Ask how each choice has beenprepared (some have lard, bacon fat,etc. added)
  • Balancing the Buffet – AYCE!(such as Ryan‟s, Golden Corral, etc.)• Survey before you serve.• Use smallest plate possible.• Pile no thicker than deck of cards.• Take 1-2 tablespoon portions –lots of white space.• Fill ¾ of plate with lower calorievegetables and fruits.• Select one portion of a non-friedmeat .• Sit away from the buffet table.• Wait 20 minutes before getting a dessert. Choose ½ cupportion of one dessert, if you still want it. (visualize yourlittle dish from class)
  • Ying and Yang of Chinese Food• VERY high in sodium.• Order from the menu (what menu???)– Beef and Broccoli– Shrimp and Lobster Sauce• Green tea may have benefits.• Egg drop, won ton or hot & sour soup good forstarters.• Choose chicken and seafood over duck andpork, if not fried.• Look for dishes that feature vegetables.• Choose plain rice rather than fried rice ornoodles - brown rice may be an option.• Limit dishes with sweet and sour sauces ornuts.• Those green beans are shiny for a reason!• Habachi grill? Request no oil or butter.• Desserts – sherbet, fruit, fortune cookie (about25 calories!)An egg roll can have300-400calories, mostly fromthe fried wontonwrapper.
  • Making the Most of Mexican• Healthy ingredients: rice, beans,grilled chicken and lean steak,salsa, limited avocado• What makes it unhealthy: cheese,sour cream, tortilla chips - ask forthese on side or removed• Chips and salsa?...think 10calories and 1 g fat per chip.• Eat taco salad without shell• Chili & other soups often low fatand high fiberLess healthy choices:1.Crispy shell chicken taco2.Refried beans3.Steak Chalupa4.Crunch wraps or gordita-typeburritos5.Nachos with refried beans6.Adding sour cream or cheeseHealthier choices:1.Grilled chicken soft taco2.Grilled vegetable fajitas3.Black beans4.Shrimp ensalada5.Grilled „fresco‟ style steak burritoor fajitas6.Veggie and bean burrito
  • Italian Restaurants• Pasta Dishes– Choose tomato or marinarasauces instead of:• Alfredo, carbonara, saltimbocca, parmigiana• Lasagna, manicotti, stuffed pastas(all have lots of cream and cheese)– Bread/Breadsticks often doused in butter or oil - requestthem plain. Eat just one.• Pizza– Order thin crust…..not original, deep dish, pan or hand-tossed; avoid stuffed crust– Lowfat toppings: pineapple, Canadian bacon, ham, grilledchicken, vegetables; request “light on cheese”– High-fat Toppings: extracheese, pepperoni, sausage, bacon, alfredo sauce
  • Fitting In Fast FoodsFried Chicken
  • Breakfast on the GoLess Healthy Choices• Biscuits or croissants• Sandwiches with sausage and/orcheese• Bagels loaded with cream cheese• Donuts• Lattes, mochas and cappuccinoswith whole milkBest Choices• Bagels with spreads on side• Jams/jellies• Breakfast sandwiches withbagels or English muffins andegg• Flavored coffees with skim milkLess Healthy Option• Sausage biscuit with egg• Orange juice (8 oz.)= Meal total670 calories33 grams fat1,015 mg sodiumHealthier Option• Egg, Canadian bacon, cheeseon plain English muffin (nobutter)• 1/2 Orange juice (4 oz.)= Meal total390 calories12 grams fat830 mg sodium
  • Best Choices• Regular, single-pattyhamburger without mayo,special sauce or cheese• Grilled chicken sandwich orstrips• Veggie burger• Garden salad with grilledchicken and low-fat dressing(check out serving size on backof dressing package)• Baked potato (watch toppings)• Yogurt parfait• Apples or other fruitLess Healthy Choices• Double-patty hamburger withcheese, mayo, special sauce, bacon• Fried chicken sandwich• Fried fish sandwich (tartar sauce)• Salad with toppings such as bacon,cheese, and ranch dressing• French fries• Milkshakes• Chicken “nuggets” or tendersBurger Chains
  • Sub Sandwich ChainsLess Healthy Choices• Foot-long sub• High-fat meat such as bacon,meatballs, or steak• Mayo-based, like Tuna Salad• The “normal” amount of higher-fat (Cheddar, American) cheese• Mayo, oil and special sauces• Keeping the sub “as is” with alltoppings and condiments• Choosing white bread or “wraps”Adding chips and cookiesBest Choices• 6-inch sub• Lean meat (roast beef, chickenbreast, lean ham) or veggies• One or two slices of lower-fatcheese (mozzarella)• Low-fat dressing, light mayo ormustard• Add extra veggie toppings• Choose whole-grain bread ortake the top slice off your suband eat it open-facedOctober 2007 Journal of Consumer Research studyfound that people tend to eat 350 more calories permeal at a sub shop than at McDonalds.
  • Fried Chicken ChainsBest Choices• Grilled or skinless chickenbreast without breading• Honey BBQ chickensandwich• Garden salad• Mashed potatoes• Limited gravy and sauces• Remove skin before eatingfried chickenLess Healthy Choices• Fried chicken, original or extra-crispy• Teriyaki wings or popcornchicken• Caesar salad (unless you requestdressing on side and nocroutons)• Chicken and biscuit “bowl”• Extra gravy and sauces
  • Add Healthy SnacksTo Meet Your Goals• Low-fat milk• Low-fat yogurt• Fresh fruit• Baby carrots; carrotor celery sticks• Vegetable juice• Cereal, fruit andskim milk
  • Summary: Make Eating OutHealthier for You• Choose restaurants that offer healthier selections.Do your homework.• Plan ahead what you‟ll eat.• Make special requests.• Consider the portion.• Share meals or requestto-go box.• Drink water with your meals• Supplement your meals with healthy snacks.
  • Presented by:Debbie Melvin, MS, CFCSArea Nutrition AgentLafourche and Terrebonne ParishesDeShoin York Friendship, MPA, CFPPAssociate Specialist - NutritionSouthern University AgCenter
  • Smart Portions Curriculum TeamA. Kay Singleton, M.S., R.D.Associate Extension Agent (FCS/4-H), Southeast/Crescent RegionDebbie Melvin, M.S., C.F.C.S.Extension Agent (Nutrition), South Central/Crescent RegionTerri Crawford, M.S.Extension Agent (Nutrition), Central RegionPenny Thibodeaux, M.S.Extension Agent (4-H), Southwest RegionJoan P. Almond, M.S.Extension Agent (FCS), Northwest/North Central RegionBeth Reames, Ph.D., LDN, R.D.Professor and Extension SpecialistEvva L. Z. Wilson, Ph.D.Extension Specialist andFNP Curriculum Coordinator (retired)