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Arte387Ch4

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  • 1. Chapter 4: Scoring and Judging Strategies Katherine Bozec and Rick Reed ARTE 387/687
  • 2. Objective/Subjective Distinction
    • These terms have been used to describe test types, however, a better use would be the way a test is scored.
    • Objective is not dependent on the mind, it is actual facts, every scorer comes to the same results
    • Subjective is dependent on the mind or an individual’s perception for existence and feelings, the scorers may have different results
  • 3. Scoring or Judging Examples
    • Any task that needs assessing, needs to be rated, judged, or scored.
    • The type of scoring strategy you need depends on the type of assessment information you want.
    • As art educators we need to understand the different scoring options.
  • 4. Checklists
    • Checklists specify behaviors, characteristics, processes, etc. and provide a place to record whether they are present or missing.
    • Checklists are useful for formative and summative assessment.
    • Checklists are used to indicate many things in assessing art and the thinking processes behind the art.
  • 5. Tallies
    • Tallies are used to track the number of times a certain behavior or event occurs.
    • Tallies can be helpful to determine how many times a student uses a certain process in an art critique, for example.
    • This type of tally would be helpful to the student as well because it would help them understand their own thinking and problem-solving processes.
    • The most common use of keeping a tally sheet is to correct a specific behavior.
  • 6. Rating Scales
    • Rating scales- rely on a numerical, verbal or graphic system for translating judgments of quality or degree.
    • Appropriate for examining problem- solving processes, products, and attitudes or motivation.
    • Emphasizes cognitive processes of reflecting and judgment/ evaluating.
  • 7. Rating Scales
    • Anchors need to be well defined to increase objectivity in scoring.
    • Students understanding is assured when they help define the anchors.
    • The likert- scale is an example of a rating scale.
      • “ Always,”“Very often,” “often,”“sometimes,” “hardly,” “hardly ever,” and “never”.
      • “ can’t do,” “can barely do,” “can do,” “can do well,” and“ wow.”
    • Benchmarks descriptors of performance levels with designated anchor
  • 8. Errors of the Rating Scale
    • Central Tendency Error
    • Halo or Sudden Death Error
    • Leniency Error
    • Construct- Relevant Error
    • Jumping the Gun Error
    • Comparison Error
  • 9. Critiques
    • Strategy takes place during or after completion of the art performance task and is focused on assessing that art performance task.
    • Informal diagnostic assessment strategy pin points strength and weaknesses of a student
    • Formative assessment
    • Address intended purposes and objectives.
    • Continuous assessment Strategies- on going assessments with both formative and summative components
      • Select performance task criteria to be discussed in the critique
      • Define achievement levels for each task criterion
      • Assign scores for each achievement level
      • Design a way for students to record their scores during the critique
    Critique Example
  • 10. Interviews
    • Teacher
    • Gives insight into the understandings, feelings, attitudes, interest, and motivations of the individual.
    • Information about students’ thinking processes
    • Tool for assessing students’ knowledge and skills in all four visual art disciplines.
    • Peer, Parent, and Other
    • Same as teacher interview but involves a student, family members, other teachers, art- related professionals.
    • Interviews
    • Interview plan
    • Video tape
    • Digital Portfolio
    • Guests
    • Peer interviews
  • 11. Student Self-Assessment
    • Types
    • Journal Probes
    • Annotated Portfolios
    • Learner Reports
    • What’s the Principle? What’s the Problem?
    • Dual Juror Viewpoints
    • Measuring Sticks
    • Constructed Response Items
  • 12. Observations
    • Informal or structured
    • Indicates students’ behaviors, habits, and also how well instruction is working.
    • Variables to Assessing Using Observation Techniques
    • Students Attitudes
    • Students Perceptions
    • Students Work Habits
    • Students Thinking Processes
  • 13. Review & Questions
  • 14. Jeopardy Choose a category. You will be given the answer. You must give the correct question.
  • 15. Choose a point value. Choose a point value.
  • 16. In this way of scoring every tester comes up with the same results
  • 17. What is objective scoring?
  • 18. This type of scoring specifies behaviors, characteristics, processes, etc. and provides a place to record whether they are present or missing.
  • 19. What are checklists?
  • 20. In this way of scoring the scorers may come up with different results.
  • 21. What is subjective scoring?
  • 22. These are used to track the number of times a certain behavior or event occurs.
  • 23. What are tallies?
  • 24. These scales rely on a numerical, verbal or graphic system for translating judgments of quality or degree.
  • 25. What are rating scales?
  • 26. These items need to be well defined to increase objectivity in scoring, they also keep a boat from moving.
  • 27. What are anchors?
  • 28. This is a way to assess student artwork and it rhymes with boutique.
  • 29. What is critique?
  • 30. When applying for a job hopefully you get one of these, these are also helpful for teachers, students, parents and peers.
  • 31. What are interviews?
  • 32. Journal Probes, Annotated Portfolios, and Learner Reports are types of this.
  • 33. What are student self-assessments?
  • 34. You can do this type of looking formally or informally.
  • 35. What is observation?
  • 36. Students Attitudes, Perceptions, Work Habits, and Thinking Processes are variables used during this assessment technique.
  • 37. What is observation technique?
  • 38. Final Jeopardy Make your wager
  • 39. Central Tendency, Halo or Sudden Death, Leniency, Construct- Relevant, Jumping the Gun, and Comparison are these types of errors.
  • 40. What are rating scale errors?