3lesson4plan2taskanalysis

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3lesson4plan2taskanalysis

  1. 2. TASK ANALYSIS <ul><li>Task analysis requires the recording of all steps for meeting a given objective in observable , or behavioural, terms and in sequential order. </li></ul>
  2. 3. TASK ANALYSIS <ul><li>When initiating any complex classroom activity it is helpful to make a CHECKLIST of all facets of the particular task you have set the students. </li></ul><ul><li>include all the ACTIONS that you anticipate ought to take place, and should be arranged, as far as is possible in sequential order. </li></ul>
  3. 4. Here is an example: <ul><li>As a lesson activity a class of Grade 4 students will make a simple collograph block of a scary monster and produce a simple print from it using a crayon rubbing technique. </li></ul><ul><li>Make a list of the actions necessary to complete the task! </li></ul>
  4. 5. <ul><li>A collograph print </li></ul>
  5. 11. Short Form
  6. 12. <ul><li>Lesson Title: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Name of the lesson </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lesson Link: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connection with the lives of the students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>other curriculum areas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>previous study </li></ul></ul>
  7. 13. <ul><li>State Goals: </li></ul><ul><li>Refer to Illinois State Goals 25/26/27 </li></ul><ul><li>Objectives : </li></ul><ul><li>State the intended learning outcomes </li></ul>
  8. 14. Indictors of a Good Objective <ul><li>A good objective: </li></ul><ul><li>Provides context for learning </li></ul><ul><li>States what will be learned (skills or concepts) </li></ul><ul><li>Indicates student behavior that will demonstrate the learning </li></ul><ul><li>Indicates the level of performance (how well) </li></ul>
  9. 15. <ul><li>An objective is a clear description of the behavior or product you want students to be able to perform/demonstrate, as the result of instruction or an activity. It should be specific, concise, observable and measurable. A good objective clearly communicates your intent and leaves little room for interpretation. Before writing learning objectives, ask yourself these questions: </li></ul><ul><li>What are you planning to achieve? </li></ul><ul><li>Why are you going to achieve this? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you intend to achieve this? </li></ul><ul><li>How will you measure the fulfillment of the objective? </li></ul><ul><li>What will the outcome be? </li></ul>
  10. 16. A Formula ( Short: A B C D ) Given [ C ONTEXT/CONDITION] students will demonstrate through [ B EHAVIOR/PRODUCT] [AT A DESIRED D EGREE OF A CHIEVEMENT].
  11. 17. Definition of Elements CONTEXT/CONDITION is the teaching contents and procedures (materials/ resources/ setting/ experience) you provide for students in this lesson (or course). BEHAVIOR/PRODUCT is what students are expected to be able to do or the product or result of the doing. The behavior or product should be observable or examinable . Verb samples : describe, explain, identify, list, evaluate, construct, draw, paint, collage, photograph, etc. DEGREE describes how well the student must perform in order for the performance to be considered acceptable. Use adverbs to distinguish the expected but measurable achievement. Adverb samples : accurately, effectively, clearly, successfully, convincingly, appropriately, skillfully, fluently, knowledgeably etc. ACHIEVEMENTS (CONCEPTS AND/OR SKILLS) are the concepts that you want students to know and/or the skills that you want students to be able to do. The concepts and skills should be contextually and clearly related to each other and to your lesson. Given [ C ONTEXT/CONDITION] students will demonstrate through [ B EHAVIOR/PRODUCT] [AT A DESIRED D EGREE OF A CHIEVEMENT].
  12. 18. Examples (exercise): <ul><li>Conceptual objective: Given a range of photographs of public buildings from western culture students will explain clearly how the form of architecture in the examples could indicate the possible social function of each building. </li></ul><ul><li>Skill objective: Given cardboard and glue, students in groups will construct a sturdy model for a simple building, no larger than 12” x 18” that successfully uses shape and detail to indicate the possible social function of the building. </li></ul>
  13. 19. Examples: <ul><li>Conceptual objective: Given a range of photographs of public buildings from western culture students will explain clearly how the form of architecture in the examples could indicate the possible social function of each building . </li></ul><ul><li>Skill objective: Given cardboard and glue , students in groups will construct a sturdy model for a simple building , no larger than 12” x 18” that successfully uses shape and detail to indicate the possible social function of the building . </li></ul>
  14. 20. <ul><li>OBJECTIVES: </li></ul><ul><li>Given three examples of each of two artist’s work students will explain clearly the different emotional effects produced by those works. (concept) </li></ul><ul><li>Using watercolor paint students will create a painting that effectively communicates a chosen feeling through the use of color and paint technique appropriate to that feeling. (skill) </li></ul><ul><li>With reference to the work of their classmates students will identify the emotion produced by the work supported by appropriate reasons. (concept) </li></ul>
  15. 21. <ul><li>Assessment Criteria: </li></ul><ul><li>What criteria will be applied to assess learning. Refer to objectives and link them </li></ul><ul><li>An assessment criterion should directly correlate to a stated objective in a lesson plan. The key elements in the objective, BEHAVIOR/PRODUCT and the DEGREE of ACHIEVEMENT , should be included in the criterion statement to indicate the examination of students’ performances. </li></ul>
  16. 22. Basic Concepts of a Criterion <ul><li>The assessment should be doable and can indicate the multiple levels of students’ performances. </li></ul><ul><li>The assessment should observe or examine students’ achievement-associated behavior or product. </li></ul><ul><li>The achievement should be explicitly described but reachable. </li></ul><ul><li>The method of measurement should be fair, clear, and evenly distributed (i.e. scoring rubrics). </li></ul>
  17. 23. <ul><li>Relationship of objectives and assessment criteria: </li></ul><ul><li>Given three examples of each of two artist’s work students will explain clearly the different emotional effects produced by those works. </li></ul><ul><li>Using watercolor paint students will create a painting that effectively communicates a chosen feeling through the use of color and paint technique appropriate to that feeling. </li></ul><ul><li>With reference to the work of their classmates students will identify the emotion produced by the work supported by appropriate reasons. </li></ul>ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Clarity of explanation of emotional effects Effective use of painting technique to communicate emotion
  18. 24. <ul><li>Teaching Resources Needed to Support the Lesson </li></ul><ul><li>List all resources to be used: prints, overheads, slides, PowerPoint, art examples… etc. </li></ul>
  19. 25. <ul><li>Art Materials Necessary for the Lesson: </li></ul><ul><li>List the materials students will need … an itemized list </li></ul>
  20. 26. BODY OF THE LESSON <ul><li>INTRODUCTION (and Motivation) </li></ul>
  21. 27. BODY OF THE LESSON <ul><li>DEVELOPMENT </li></ul>
  22. 28. BODY OF THE LESSON <ul><li>CONCLUSION </li></ul>
  23. 29. <ul><li>CRITICAL REFLECTION </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Critique </li></ul>

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