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5 Reasons to Stop Investing in Facebook - SXSW Interactive 2012 - Social Media

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SXSW Interactive 2012 Presentation: Brands have been diving head first into Facebook over the past few years but their social reality has failed to live up to their lofty expectations. Guided by a sea …

SXSW Interactive 2012 Presentation: Brands have been diving head first into Facebook over the past few years but their social reality has failed to live up to their lofty expectations. Guided by a sea of experts who can say "social" but can’t do social, brand pages often resemble online ghost towns with engagement that consists of mere small talk and fake smiles. To make matters worse, Facebook went from a friendly handhold to a ruthless chokehold of world-wide-web domination. This presentation will help you put Facebook back in its rightful place. PLEASE NOTE: In order for the hyperlinks in the presentation to work, you must download the PDF. Unfortunately, Slideshare's UI doesn't tolerate them. Many thanks.

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  • 1. Reasons Yo u S h o u l d S t o p I n v e s t i n g in Facebook by Niki WeberEmail Website Linkedin Dateniki.e.weber@gmail.com metavintage.com linkedin.com/in/nikiweber May 8, 2012
  • 2. Before we begin, here’s a note about Identifying sources The icons shown below can be found throughout the presentation. Each are hyper-linked. All you have to do is click on the icon to drive to additional information (e.g. deeper explanations, research findings, clarifications, references, sources, etc.). IDEA Click for insights, further clarification, explanations DATA Click for statistics, research, resources SHARE Click fo credits, inspirations, sparks5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing in Facebook 2
  • 3. Back in the day Should I be on Facebook?5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 3
  • 4. Today Social = Facebook5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing in Facebook 4
  • 5. What’s needed A Social Reset Go Back. We f*cked up everything.5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing in Facebook 5
  • 6. How I really Feel about Facebook PERSONALLY PROFESSIONALLY “Social networking...which seemed to It doesn’t matter what I think personally. promise my brain the vitamin of human It only matters what my target audiences’ interaction, but actually traded my info think, feel, do, and see. If my audience is to the corporate world and left me with on Facebook, I need to be there. If they little more than a blackhole that sucked aren’t, I need to go where they are. away what little attention span the internet had already left me with...”*5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 6
  • 7. Who am I? My 8-mile speech I’m by no means a digital prophet. My creativity is a combination of left and right brain. Most recently I was the Digital Planning Director/Creative Innovations Director at TBWAChiatDay. I don’t have a Facebook page for 7 compelling reasons. For Facebook testing and observation I use an alias named, ‘Lola.’ I only blog or tweet to discuss my personal, non-work passions. At work, my passion is my client. Their brand. Not mine. I’m direct. I don’t shy away from a debate. Please refrain from bashing BrainSport’s website—there is a reason for everything. I don’t hate Facebook and I’m not really anti-social. I often speak in hyperbole for added dramatic effect. I am strongly opposed to marketing bullshit. This is not a hater speech. I have nothing to gain from giving this talk. I have no doubt Facebook could give a shit about this talk.5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 7
  • 8. What Facebook probably Thinks of my talk PRICKED EGO BUT WILL PRETEND NOT TO GIVE A SH!T Here DOES NOT GIVE A SH!T WILL NOT WILL ACKNOWLEDGE RETAILIATE5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 8
  • 9. Let’s also Get this out of the way Occasionally, Facebook isn’t a terrible idea. However, even if you’re in Facebook’s sweet spot, it still means you need a Social Reset. Facebook is only a part of what social entails. From my experience and from audience insights, I believe Facebook isn’t a terrible idea when: YOU’RE TARGETING YOUR BRAND CAN YOUR BRAND ORGANICALLY THESE AUDIENCES: BE CLASSIFIED AS: MANIFESTS AS: • Moms (all phases) • Retail/CPG • Customer service • Students (of all levels) • Complex, new product • Events • New parents • Mature produce • Content creators • Narcissists • Cause/non-profit • Pictures • The lonely, voyeurs, or stalkers • Commodity (looking to differentiate) • Exciting polls! • Casual gamers • Social gaming • Rewards and incentives • Existing passionate communities • Babies! • Famous and followed • Persons going through a breakup • Pet-based (sponsored-celebs) or some other painful life event • Celebrity-ladened • Exclusive and insider • Deal-seekers (artist, team, player, etc.) • Birthday celebrators • Rapidly changing inventory • Wedding-minded • Critics, conversationalists, or “in-the-knowers”5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 9
  • 10. Why now? Last July I was pissed...5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 10
  • 11. Why now? It’s a time where... THERE’S AN ALARMING LACK “THOUGHTS” ARE REDUCED OF OPINIONS AND CREATIVITY TO SOUND BYTES PEW AND MASHABLE OUR INSTINCTIVE ATTRACTION TO SEEM UNDER THE SPELL GOSSIP HAS MADE FACEBOOK THE OF FACEBOOK US MAGAZINE FOR NON-CELEBS I MISS BRANDS DOING THINGS FACEBOOK’S “CONNECTIONS” THAT WERE MEANINGFUL ENABLE GROUP THINK THAT MADE ME WANT TO BE TO A DEGREE THAT LOYAL TO THEM MAKES ME NERVOUS AN INCREDIBLE AMOUT I MISS A TIME WHERE APPLE OF BAD DATA AND AND REDBULL AREN’T THE ONLY MISINFORMATION TWO BRANDS DOING THINGS IS BEING SYNDICATED RIGHT MARKETING-WISE5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 11
  • 12. 5 Reasons you should Stop investing in Facebook5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 12
  • 13. 5 Reasons you should Stop investing in Facebook 1 WE’RE EXPERIENCING A SOCIAL-CARGO-CULT AND IT’S DISTORTING THE LANDSCAPE5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 13
  • 14. What is a Social Cargo Cult? The real-life ethnological phenomenon that happens when a technologically primitive society comes in contact with a technologically more advanced society. (Think of digital immigrants entering the world of digital natives.) It’s a term used to describe anyone else who imitates superficial features of a system (in this case, military logistics) and hopes to replicate the original’s success, without any thought or understanding of the intrinsic workings of the system. Reason #15 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 14
  • 15. Evidence of a Social Cargo Cult Inexperienced social media ‘gurus’ and Facebook’s massive marketing tidal wave left behind a modern day cargo cult of social vocabulary. Today, nearly every marketer can speak social, but most do not know what the hell they actually mean. Reason #15 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 15
  • 16. How does a social cargo cult impact the Social Media Landscape? a. c. e. Repetitious Theoretical Bully jargon social experts tactics d. b. Safe bets SOCIAL Misinformation SLUDGE deluge Reason #15 Reasons You Should Stop Investing in Facebook 16
  • 17. What Social Sludge looks like Reason #1 The Internet5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 17
  • 18. A word about Those safe from the storm “TRUTH IS, NOT EVERYONE CAN BE COOL [SOCIALLY] AND FOR THOSE WHO ARE NOT, YOU HAVE FACEBOOK. - Anonymously Obvious Reason #15 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 18
  • 19. 5 Reasons you should Stop investing in Facebook 1 WE’RE EXPERIENCING A SOCIAL-CARGO-CULT AND IT’S DISTORTING THE LANDSCAPE 2 YOU DON’T OWN IT, IT’S NOT YOURS, AND IT WILL NEVER PUT YOU FIRST, EVER5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 19
  • 20. You don’t own it. It’s not yours. Your brand. Their server. Their data. Without even a fight, most brands gave Up power, control and ownership. Reason #25 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 20
  • 21. 5 Reasons you should Stop investing in Facebook 1 WE’RE EXPERIENCING A SOCIAL-CARGO-CULT AND IT’S DISTORTING THE LANDSCAPE 2 YOU DON’T OWN IT, IT’S NOT YOURS, AND IT WILL NEVER PUT YOU FIRST, EVER 3 EXPECTATION HAS FAILED TO LIVE UP TO THE REALITY5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 21
  • 22. Expectations To Live Up Have Failed To Reality Reason #35 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 22
  • 23. Expectation Reality Free & Easy Expensive & Hard work Reason #35 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 23
  • 24. Expectation Reality Why Not ? Oh Sh!t Reason #35 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 24
  • 25. Expectation Reality Authentic Community Forced Relationship Reason #35 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 25
  • 26. Expectation Reality We Have Social We Have A Process Figured Out On Paper Reason #35 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 26
  • 27. Expectation Reality Facebook Fans Facebook…the F*ck If I Know Reason #35 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 27
  • 28. Expectation Reality Honest, Transparent Opportunistically Honest, & Authentic* Transparent & Authentic Reason #35 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook *The Bullshit Trinity of Social 28
  • 29. 5 Reasons you should Stop investing in Facebook 1 WE’RE EXPERIENCING A SOCIAL-CARGO-CULT AND IT’S DISTORTING THE LANDSCAPE 2 YOU DON’T OWN IT, IT’S NOT YOURS, AND IT WILL NEVER PUT YOU FIRST, EVER 3 EXPECTATION HAS FAILED TO LIVE UP TO THE REALITY 4 LEGALLY AND / OR STRUCTURALLY YOU’RE PROBABLY F*CKED5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 29
  • 30. Legally and / or structurally You’re probably f*cked. FULLY STAFFED PROGRAMMATIC STRUCTURE UNDERSTAFFED HIGH LEGAL’S POWER LOW OVER SOCIAL Reason #45 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 30
  • 31. 5 Reasons you should Stop investing in Facebook 1 WE’RE EXPERIENCING A SOCIAL-CARGO-CULT AND IT’S DISTORTING THE LANDSCAPE 2 YOU DON’T OWN IT, IT’S NOT YOURS, AND IT WILL NEVER PUT YOU FIRST, EVER 3 EXPECTATION HAS FAILED TO LIVE UP TO THE REALITY 4 LEGALLY AND / OR STRUCTURALLY YOU’RE PROBABLY F*CKED 5 FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE PATH TO IPO5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 31
  • 32. On the path to Ipo Facebook Lost Its Mind Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 32
  • 33. Facebook koobecaF Be open Decline to comment Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 33
  • 34. Facebook koobecaF Apps on Our mission is to Facebook may not give people the integrate, link to, power to share & promote, distribute, make the world more or redirect to any open & connected app on any other competing social platform Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 34
  • 35. Facebook koobecaF 425mm 425mm monthly monthly active mobile actively missed users opportunities Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 35
  • 36. Facebook koobecaF Frictionless Without sharing expressed consent Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 36
  • 37. Facebook koobecaF F-Commerce F-Commerce is the future is a huge fail Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 37
  • 38. Facebook koobecaF Premium 60% of people ads drive do not want to brand impact engage with brands via social media Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 38
  • 39. Facebook koobecaF Facebook partners Facebook profile with Spotify is required to have a Spotify account Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 39
  • 40. Facebook koobecaF Developer Voted friendly worst API Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 40
  • 41. Facebook koobecaF Facebook Brand sites will will replace continue to live brand sites on our servers Stephen Haines, commercial director of Facebook’s U.K. Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 41
  • 42. Facebook koobecaF Facebook Facebook is strongly is #1 in referral encouraging longer traffic engagement within Facebook Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 42
  • 43. Facebook koobecaF Brands get 46% more Brand pages are engagement with seeing a drop in Facebook Timeline engagement, brand pages regardless of whether they’ve switched to Timeline Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 43
  • 44. Facebook koobecaF “I know that “In most cases people don’t want younger people privacy...especially think very much younger people” the same as older people when it comes to online ” Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 44
  • 45. Facebook koobecaF “Many lightweight An exhaustive interactions over time” amount of insignificant and often deal-ladened interactions over time with no measurable ROI Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 45
  • 46. Facebook koobecaF Social at scale We missed our will not be free profit goals by $500 million, pay up brands Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 46
  • 47. Facebook koobecaF Premiums allow “We’re sort . brands to share of like 1951 . content on the best television” places on Facebook Mark D’Arcy, a former Time Warner ad exec who’s now Facebook’s director of global creative As stated on Facebook’s fMC site solutions, said of Facebook ads Reason #55 Reasons you should stop investing in Facebook 47
  • 48. 5 Implications for Moving forward5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 48
  • 49. 5 Implications for Moving forward 1 ACCEPT REALITY & FORCE CLARITY (even if it’s an uncomfortable process)5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 49
  • 50. 5 Implications for moving forward Accept reality & force claritySolution #15 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 50
  • 51. 5 Implications for moving forward Part of accepting reality If you want to realistically deliver a memorable experience, you can have two but not all three principles in effect—a take on Keeley’s Triangle. FAST (even if it’s an uncomfortable process) FREE ENGAGING (e.g. intern vs. professional blogger, (meaningful, relevant, community manager, outreach structures, irresistibly shareable) systems, and measurement)Solution #15 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 51
  • 52. 5 Implications for moving forward Part of accepting reality If you want to realistically deliver a memorable experience, you can have two but not all three principles in effect—a take on Keeley’s Triangle. FAST (even if it’s an uncomfortable process) ...but it’s going to cost you (e.g. systemic team, quality creative, risk tolerance, etc.) FREE ENGAGING (e.g. intern vs. professional blogger, (meaningful, relevant, community manager, outreach structures, irresistibly shareable) systems, and measurement)Solution #15 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 52
  • 53. 5 Implications for moving forward Part of accepting reality If you want to realistically deliver a memorable experience, you can have two but not all three principles in effect—a take on Keeley’s Triangle. FAST (even if it’s an uncomfortable process) ...but it’s going to cost you (e.g. systemic team, quality creative, risk tolerance, etc.) FREE ENGAGING (e.g. intern vs. professional blogger, (meaningful, relevant, community manager, outreach structures, irresistibly shareable) systems, and measurement)Solution #1 ...but it won’t be fast.5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook (e.g. will be programmatic, will require a dedicated team, etc.) 53
  • 54. 5 Implications for moving forward Part of accepting reality If you want to realistically deliver a memorable experience, you can have two but not all three principles in effect—a take on Keeley’s Triangle. FAST (even if it’s an uncomfortable process) ...but it will not be good or ...but it’s going to cost you it will have a short shelf life (e.g. systemic team, quality and be hard to replicate creative, risk tolerance, etc.) (e.g. polls, pushed content, sweepstakes, contests, posts, etc. –not reactive or proactive, just pushing) FREE ENGAGING (e.g. intern vs. professional blogger, (meaningful, relevant, community manager, outreach structures, irresistibly shareable) systems, and measurement)Solution #1 ...but it won’t be fast.5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook (e.g. will be programmatic, will require a dedicated team, etc.) 54
  • 55. 5 Implications for Moving forward 1 ACCEPT REALITY & FORCE CLARITY (even if it’s an uncomfortable process) 2 ROLL-UP YOUR SLEEVES (take action–test, learn, optimize and repeat)5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 55
  • 56. 5 Implications for moving forward Roll up your sleevesSolution #25 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 56
  • 57. 5 Implications for Moving forward 1 ACCEPT REALITY & FORCE CLARITY (even if it’s an uncomfortable process) 2 ROLL-UP YOUR SLEEVES (take action–test, learn, optimize and repeat) 3 PUT FACEBOOK BACK IN THEIR PLACE (and treat them like the media vendor they’ve become)5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 57
  • 58. 5 Implications for moving forward Put Facebook back in their placeSolution #35 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 58
  • 59. 5 Implications for Moving forward 1 ACCEPT REALITY & FORCE CLARITY (even if it’s an uncomfortable process) 2 ROLL-UP YOUR SLEEVES (take action–test, learn, optimize and repeat) 3 PUT FACEBOOK BACK IN THEIR PLACE (and treat them like the media vendor they’ve become) 4 OBTAIN TRUSTED SOCIAL EXPERT (they build more than blog)5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 59
  • 60. 5 Implications for moving forward Obtain trusted social expertSolution #45 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 60
  • 61. 5 Implications for Moving forward 1 ACCEPT REALITY & FORCE CLARITY (even if it’s an uncomfortable process) 2 ROLL-UP YOUR SLEEVES (take action–test, learn, optimize and repeat) 3 PUT FACEBOOK BACK IN THEIR PLACE (and treat them like the media vendor they’ve become) 4 OBTAIN TRUSTED SOCIAL EXPERT (they build more than blog) 5 SEEK COUNSEL FROM THE SOCIAL CLAIRVOYANT (as qualified & accurate as 99.2% of social media experts*)5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook *It’s an educated guess 61
  • 62. Solution #55 Reasons You Should Stop Investing in Facebook 1n Facebook MetaVintage.com/Fortune 62
  • 63. 5 Implications for Moving forward 1 ACCEPT REALITY & FORCE CLARITY (even if it’s an uncomfortable process) 2 ROLL-UP YOUR SLEEVES (take action–test, learn, optimize and repeat) 3 PUT FACEBOOK BACK IN THEIR PLACE (and treat them like the media vendor they’ve become) So, now what? 4 OBTAIN TRUSTED SOCIAL EXPERT (they build more than blog) 5 SEEK COUNSEL FROM THE SOCIAL CLAIRVOYANT (as qualified & accurate as 99.2% of social media experts*)5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook *It’s an educated guess 63
  • 64. Consult an expert on mixing ‘Friends & Money’ “If you need a friend, get a dog.”5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 64
  • 65. If you forget everything else Remember to ask.. . “WHY AM I ON FACEBOOK?”5 Reasons You Should Stop Investing 1n Facebook 65
  • 66. Shout - out’s &Thank you’sIt takes a village to do digital correctly, and this presentationis no different. A very special thanks to my digital friends whohelped me along the way.J.P. Guiseppi Nick DrakeTim Shea Kari McGlynnAdam Wiese Gage CleggRyan Potter All My BrainSport PeepsEugene Buono Jon, Roberto & the Rest of the Guys at CovelopTo request the full-length presentation, please send me an e-mail.By Email Website LinkedinNiki Weber niki.e.weber@gmail.com metavintage.com linkedin.com/in/nikiweber
  • 67. Appendix CAVEAT: Keeping up with the trials and tribulations of Facebook is a full-time job. I’ve included the most up-to-date research in an attempt to stall the obsolesce of this presentation. Eventually my blog (metavintage.com) will act as the real-time version of the document. It will dive into certain slides deeper, add new research and Facebook developments, provide voice-over commentary, etc. Additionally, I tried to feature research sources with the least bias, but most consistency (e.g. eMarketer). Additionally, it’s incredibly hard to separate fact from fiction. I’ve tried to shed light on the side of the argument that rarely is seen. I would be more than happy to add opposing views to the deck as it grows, so please feel free to send.
  • 68. OPENING: A LITTLE BACKGROUND BEFORE WE BEGIN
  • 69. Appendix A HEADS UP ON WHAT I MEANT BY “INVESTMENT”? I’m referring to the blood, sweat, tears, and dollars spent on keeping a Facebook brand page alive. Apologies if you came here thinking that by “investment” I was referring to the IPO kind. I wish I was clairvoyant last July when I submitted this topic, but unfortunately it was pure serendipity. Although, it would have been incredibly badass to have predicted it seven months ago. One critical caveat: The aim of this presentation always was to get marketers to look at Facebook a little more critically and a little less like a groupie. I want to encourage discussion. My opinions are by no means perfect, but it’s a conduit to broaching a subject that shockingly hasn’t been addressed. Please comment away and hit me up on LinkedIn or through email. I’d love to optimize this presentation so it eventually becomes a smart, useful tool.Appendix BACK
  • 70. Appendix WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY BACK IN THE DAY? I’m referencing 2008, 2009, and the early part of 2010. During this time brands we’re still tight with MySpace and only starting to consider Facebook presences. To be fair, social was so new that most brands didn’t have time or the future insight to address the question: What’s my brands role in social? Why am I on MySpace or Facebook? How will being social benefit my business? Brands’ social strategy (if there even was one) was more of a follow the leader vs. the right thing to build my brand. As you can see below, In 2008 and 2009 MySpace spending was still exceeding Facebook spending. At this point in time, brands were not in a state of social hysteria and actually contemplated participating on Facebook (and social in general.) By no means was Facebook a no-brainer nor did the idea of Facebook equate to social. However, in 2010, Facebook exponentially pulled away with the lead.Appendix NEXT
  • 71. Appendix BACK IN THE DAY THERE WERE TANGIBLE METRICS: At the close of 2009 there was no mention of “engagement,” “social at the core,” or “advocacy” as a social media marketing objective. Instead, three separate and independent studies showed marketers using hard, tangible metrics to define objectives like increased website traffic or lead generation. In looking back, we were closer to finding the true ROI of social media in 2009 than we are today.Appendix BACK
  • 72. Appendix A DRAMATIC SURGE IN FACEBOOK LOVE OCCURRED IN 2010 AND CONTINUES TO GROW. A dramatic surge in Facebook love occurred in 2010. Through a brilliant CMO and agency exec targeted campaign, massive audience numbers, and a sexy start-up sheen, Facebook has become synonymous with social. Having a presence on the platform has become a literal no-brainer. Without a doubt, brands are in love with Facebook and believe it to be their primary social media outlet. 85% of companies viewed Facebook as successful, aAppendix significant jump from 54% in 2009. Yet Facebook hadnt matched message or bulletin boards, with 93% reporting it was a successful tactic. foursquare also saw a significant increase in usefulness; it wasnt even measured in 2009, yet in 2010, 75% of companies reported it was a successful tactic. NEXT There was a 10% increase in Facebook utilization by Fortune 500 companies in 2010. Facebook usage continued to increase from 2011 - 2012.
  • 73. Appendix BY 2011& 2012, SOCIAL MEDIA GREATLY IMPACTS BRANDS, THEIR BUSINESS, AND THEIR BUDGETS. Facebook and social media in general are impacting marketers more than any previous vendor or medium, because it goes beyond the walls of marketing. The perception of social media begins to change in 2010 with more companies viewing it as important. 86% reported social media technologies to be somewhat or very important to their business and marketing strategies in 2010, up from 79% in 2009. And growth was even stronger among those The rise of social media is the leading factor impacting who consider it “very important.”Appendix the marketing world at 70%. Surprisingly, critical business factors like competition, ROI, and disruptive technologies don’t come close to the impact social media has had on their organizations. NEXT
  • 74. Appendix BY 2011& 2012, SOCIAL MEDIA GREATLY IMPACTS BRANDS, THEIR BUSINESS, AND THEIR BUDGETS. Multiple, separate and independent studies show budget allocation for Facebook and social media in general is on the http://gim.ie/xz9o rise, even though the medium has failed to produce convincing ROI.Appendix NEXT
  • 75. Appendix BY 2011& 2012, SOCIAL MEDIA GREATLY IMPACTS BRANDS, THEIR BUSINESS, AND THEIR BUDGETS. Multiple separate and independent studies show budget allocation for Facebook and social media in general is on the rise even though the medium has failed to produce convincing ROI.Appendix http://gim.ie/ywZn http://gim.ie/ywW2 NEXT
  • 76. Appendix BY 2011& 2012, SOCIAL MEDIA GREATLY IMPACTS BRANDS, THEIR BUSINESS, AND THEIR BUDGETS. Multiple separate and independent studies show budget allocation for Facebook and social media in general is on the rise even though the medium has failed to produce convincing ROI.Appendix http://gim.ie/ywVG NEXT
  • 77. Appendix FACEBOOK STARTS TO UP THE ANTE. In the last half of 2011, most Fortune 500 brands felt a full-court offense from Facebook’s sales teams. I’ve pasted below a few slides that I always chuckled at... Are these not the least engaging ad units opportunities What a weird primary stat to share and compare...I This triangle is probably the least creative, primarily un- you’ve ever seen? Events? polls? Comments? Likes? never cared how long a user stayed on a customizable, un-sexy, and uninteresting tool kit for And search-like banners? These options may homepage, it was the action they took or the brands.Appendix occasionally convert and deliver on some people’s content that engaged them that was important. The definition of engaging, but in my opinion they are the data is too vague to be insightful. least engaging units, which a majority of brands don’t need to generate revenue. NEXT
  • 78. Appendix FACEBOOK FILES FOR IPO. On February 2, 2012, Facebook filed for IPO. Finally the public received greater transparency into Facebook’s inter- workings. Two things were clear: (1) Facebook was $500 million under their profit projections. (2) In possibly an unfair comparison, Facebook is way behind where Google was at this same stage given their inability to define a clear and valuable monetization platform. Implication for brands: The sales pressure we’ve started to adjust to is going to continue to grow and possibly get worse.Appendix NEXT
  • 79. Appendix FACEBOOK HOLDS THEIR FIRST fMC. On February 29, 2012 Facebook held its first conference in New York for marketers (and some of their media and agency partners) called fMC. It was a myopic but thoroughly detailed attempt to educate marketers on social and new changes to their platform. They created guides, org charts, and rule books for marketers. They presented self-funded Forrester studies. Most of their suggestions required a brand to be a heavy but nimble content producer. The most alarming aspect to me was what Facebook didn’t say. The changes they cited as being necessary to success lay at the feet of brands and marketers, but very little changed within Facebook that actually helps brands. It was like a friend who talks about themselves the whole time and never asks how you’re doing. To be fair, some content was good, some bad. All was in an effort to increase Facebook revenue generation. None focused on improving the experience for Facebook users.Appendix Facebook created a microsite to host the conference’s various materials here: http://www.facebook.com/business/fmc NEXT
  • 80. Appendix FACEBOOK HOLDS THEIR FIRST fMC. At fMC, Facebook announced a variety of improvements and changes. Primarily the changes centered around new offerings for marketers in the areas of analytics, ads, and timeline. Below (and on the next few slides) I’ve recapped a few of the changes I found most interesting. New Facebook Ad Offerings: Reach Generator: Rather than pay on a per-click or per-thousand impressions basis, Reach Generator lets advertisers pay a fixed fee based on their Page’s fan count. In return, Facebook guarantees exposure of a Page’s posts to 75 percent of their fans a month, and roughly 50 percent a week, by showing them as ads in the ads sidebar, news feed, and logout page. Typically a Page post only reaches 16 percent of a Page’s fans, so this creates a simple way to pay for added distribution. It will be interesting to see how fans respond to this more pervasive advertising. Will Unlikes increase? Will fans engage? Only time will tell. Also, it was shocking to me that posts on a brand’s Facebook page only reaches 16% of their fans. That’s insanely low, proving that remaining on Facebook is no longer free even from an exposure standpoint. Facebook “Premium” Advertising (including mobile): Premium for Facebook guarantees impressions and placement for Sponsored Stories and premium ads in the news feed, home pages and log-out page, in addition to their former placement on the right hand side of the page. These ads are derived from Facebook page posts. Premium stories and ads show up on tablets and mobile devices now as well. Well, these ads will certainly keep brands and their community managers busy churning out content–irregardless if your a brand who naturally creates content or not. I’m not sure this is a truly viable option for all brands. Additionally, I believe this isn’t a compelling mobile advertising opportunity. Considering over half of Facebook’s universe logs in primarily thought mobile, brands must cut their odds of reaching people by 50% from the get-go.Appendix The company is finally trying to monetize mobile, a little bit, selling an ad product that guarantees brands that their "fans" will see posts to brand pages on Facebook, even if Facebook has to push them into user News Feeds on desktop or mobile. http://www.facebook.com/business/fmc New Media & Marketing: http://bit.ly/HPI8gy NEXT
  • 81. Appendix FACEBOOK HOLDS THEIR FIRST fMC. At fMC, Facebook announced a variety of improvements and changes. Primarily the changes centered around new offerings for marketers in the areas of analytics, ads, and timeline. Below (and on the next few slides) I’ve recapped a few of the changes I found most interesting. Facebook Timeline & Brand Pages Updates: Private Messages Between Brands and Users Brands will be able to send and receive private messages with users. They claim this will allow for much deeper consumer interaction and will also enable community managers to take extended customer inquiries off the Timeline and into a private message. So in other words, Facebook has given brands a way to hide negative conversations from their page or timeline. For a company who talks about the need to be open and transparent, this is bit of a step backwards.Appendix http://www.facebook.com/business/fmc New Media & Marketing: http://bit.ly/HPI8gy NEXT
  • 82. Appendix FACEBOOK HOLDS THEIR FIRST fMC. At fMC, Facebook announced a variety of improvements and changes. Primarily the changes centered around new offerings for marketers in the areas of analytics, ads, and timeline. Below (and on the next few slides) I’ve recapped a few of the changes I found most interesting. New Facebook Ad Offerings: Facebook Direct Messaging (Another Way to Look at Private Messages): Heres how the direct messaging system will work: If a Facebook user sends brands a message, they can answer back - though consumers must initiate the dialogue. Brand pages were previously relegated to responding to customer concerns only via wall post responses. I think these quotes sum it up nicely: "The problems its going to create for community management, “Yet Another Social CRM Channel - Help or Headache? customer care, and one-to-one responses are going to be relatively Facebook introduced the direct messaging feature among a significant," said Michael Scissons, CEO of social media marketing slew of ad product announcements on Wednesday. With the company Syncapse. "You think of these large brands and the news, one could almost hear a pack of CRM directors groan, challenges theyve had with simply publishing [on Facebook]. Now they realizing theyll need to add Facebook to phone, email, live chat, are managing the two-way dialogue in a one-to-one manner. Its going Twitter, etc. on their laundry list of channel concerns.” to create a significant amount of work." "Bob Kraut, SVP of advertising and marketing communications "Brands who take their consumer relationships seriously are already for Arbys, suggested the direct messages may help firms avert monitoring and responding frequently to fans comments and questions comment threads that spiral out of control, causing bad on Facebook," said Lisa Mabe, founder of Washington, DC-based branding. "This [will] lower the risk and be better for customers in marketing and PR firm Hewar Communications. "Similarly, consumers the long run," he said. "There will be more people in the game, will expect brands to acknowledge and get back to them in a timelyAppendix and maybe less transparency. But maybe the customer is fine manner via the new private messages. Brands absolutely must stay on with that. Its the customer that counts." top of their private messages coming in from consumers or else risk turning off or even losing customers." (Right...the customer is fine with less transparency, not the circumventing a huge PR nightmare.) http://www.clickz.com/clickz/news/2156896/facebooks-direct-messaging-brands-talking NEXT
  • 83. Appendix FACEBOOK HOLDS THEIR FIRST fMC. At fMC, Facebook announced a variety of improvements and changes. Primarily the changes centered around new offerings for marketers in the areas of analytics, ads, and timeline. Below (and on the next few slides) I’ve recapped a few of the changes I found most interesting. New Facebook Ad Offerings: Facebook “Log-Out Experience” Ad Unit: Facebook is starting to take a different approach to advertising, which traditionally uses a cost- per-click or cost-per-views model with their new log-out ad unit. At $700,000 each day, this brand exclusive ad unit is worth about $256 million a year — assuming it stays at this price — which represents an extra 6.7 percent of revenue growth (based off $3.7 billion in revenue in 2011). While Facebook has tried to condition advertisers to take a more social approach, the log-out is a shotgun for those looking for the most reach and frequency as quickly as possible. Things to consider: + Targeting isn’t ideal as users can be targeted only by age and gender, according to Facebook. + Reach of the log-out ads is limited to the number of users who actually log out -- a subset of Facebooks U.S. audience. (When announcing log-out ads last month at the fMC conference for marketers, company executives said that 37 million U.S. users log out daily.) However, these “logger-outers” represent only a subset of Facebook’s universe. Why do these people log-out? What’s their demographic/psychographic/ technographic background? Are they logging out because they are on a shared computer? A work computer? + While I’m always down for testing, the price tag is too pricey for most brands’ to serve simply as a test. ButAppendix maybe most importantly, the ads, should history repeat itself, will fail with Facebook members, but brands will snag them anyway. http://read.bi/GQEyUW http://bit.ly/GNJ9Vb NEXT http://bit.ly/GPsulF
  • 84. Appendix FACEBOOK HOLDS THEIR FIRST fMC. At fMC, Facebook announced a variety of improvements and changes. Primarily the changes centered around new offerings for marketers in the areas of analytics, ads, and timeline. Below (and on the next few slides) I’ve recapped a few of the changes I found most interesting. Facebook Timeline & Brand Pages Updates: Facebook Page Insights Page insights will start reporting data with a latency of 5-10 minutes, not two or more days as it currently stands. I guess it’s great that after 5+ years of existence, brands can finally see a limited selection of reporting in real-time. It’s amazing to me this wasn’t fixed years ago. Seems like a pending IPO forced the correction.Appendix http://www.facebook.com/business/fmc http://tcrn.ch/H2qSXl NEXT
  • 85. Appendix FACEBOOK STARTS TEACHING BRANDS HOW TO BE SOCIAL. With Alicia Keyes playing music in the background, Facebook presented some pretty audacious recommendations to brands at fMC. A few of my favorite, jaw-dropping ones are included below. To see the rest, visit the link below. Implication for marketers: Start treating Facebook like a vendor. Stop providing them with the all-access-pass to your brand.Appendix Want a social blueprint for how to be a social brand? Facebook has you covered. Not sure how to structure your company? Facebook has you covered. http://www.facebook.com/business/fmc NEXT
  • 86. Appendix FACEBOOK STARTS TEACHING BRANDS HOW TO BE SOCIAL. Facebook presented some pretty audacious recommendations to brands at fMC. A few of my favorite, jaw-dropping ones are included below. To see the rest, visit the link below. Implication for marketers: Start treating Facebook like a vendor. Stop providing them with the all-access-pass to your brand.Appendix Want to know what’s wrong with your corporate culture? Want to know what you’re doing wrong in your social marketing efforts (in other words Facebook)? Facebook has you covered. Want a solution that provides more revenue to Facebook? Facebook has you covered. http://www.facebook.com/business/fmc NEXT
  • 87. Appendix FACEBOOK STARTS TEACHING BRANDS HOW TO BE SOCIAL. With Alicia Keyes playing music in the background, Facebook also shared the findings of a self-financed Forrester study that looked appears to focus on social media (not just Facebook exclusively). To see the studies, visit the link below. Implication for marketers: Start treating Facebook like a vendor. Stop providing them with the all-access-pass to your brand. You want some Facebook-funded research, which served as the backbone to everything shared at fMC, but that doesn’t delve into any of the outstanding questions marketers have? Facebook has you covered with these two Forrester studies:Appendix http://www.facebook.com/business/fmc NEXT
  • 88. Appendix FACEBOOK STARTS TEACHING BRANDS HOW TO BE SOCIAL. In March, Paul Adams, Facebook’s global brand experience manager chided brands for their behavior in social (e.g. Facebook) in a presentation titled, Why Marketers Misunderstand Facebook. His Point: Whenever a new mass medium is invented, marketers try to force their old habits into the new platform. That doesnt work, and its only when marketers learn how the new medium really works that they become successful using it for advertising. To prove his theory, Adams condensed the entire history of media, from the invention of the printing press in 1440 through to today, into just two well-designed PowerPoint slides. The first one notes which media were subject to censorship and which contributed to the death of privacy; the second notes the occasions in which people attempted to use new media as a replacement—rather than an addition—for the old. His stated example: The telephone, Adams explains, was originally thought to be a fantastic solution to broadcasting. You’d dial-in, leave the receiver dangling, and listen along with all the others to the day’s broadcast. My Point: Facebook isn’t social. Facebook is like a brands’ customer service 800 number. I think it’s less that brands don’t get Facebook. It’s more like they understand the giant undertaking and wonder whether it’s worth it. With little to no positive, clearly documented ROI to show, Adams just comes off as a typical arrogant Facebook employee overstepping their bounds and missing the huge elephant in the room–their platform is starting to die, it allows for limited brand engagement, it doesn’t deliver ROI, and to do it right can be an expensive pain in the ass.Appendix http://slidesha.re/GY5uTg BACK
  • 89. Appendix WHAT’S A SOCIAL RESET? Most brands started on Facebook without truly understanding why and how it would benefit their business. Their social strategy (if there even was one) was more of a follow the leader vs. the right thing to build my brand. With volumes of data and anecdotal evidence, we need to pause what we’re doing. For the moment, we need to stop building more branded apps, stop with the like- driven campaigns, & stop including Facebook in brainstorms, and internal meetings, Right now, It’s time for some tough self-reflection... Why am I on Facebook? Is my audience even on Facebook in a meaningful way? Are they even my fans? What value does my brand derive, and is it set up for success? Are there other, possibly better-suited, places for my brand to exist (even beyond the usual suspects of Twitter, YouTube, etc.) based on what I know about my target audiences’ behaviors? This presentation is dedicated to all the advertisers, marketers, entrepreneurs, creatives, clients, users, gurus, people, humans, and the like–we need a social reset, a pause in the insanity to reflect and redefine social. Let’s look at the evidence from the past few years–the data. Let’s be honest about our issues with legal, corporate structure, and political realities. Let’s look at the audiences and see what they are up to and where else they may be. Let’s firm up tangible, beneficial, business-driving success metrics.Appendix One final caveat: I’m not saying brands and agencies haven’t mapped this out already. It’s my hypothesis that the pressure Facebook has been placing on them since announcing the IPO has made waters murky and most haven’t had time to re-evaluate. NEXT
  • 90. Appendix WHAT’S A SOCIAL RESET? Today a remarkable series of events have led to social being equivalent to Facebook. However, even in the face of Facebook’s explosive growth and marketers exponentially increasing financial commitment, engagement is only slightly greater today than it was in Q1’2009.Appendix NEXT http://gim.ie/yHpS
  • 91. Appendix WHY A SOCIAL RESET IS NEEDED? As shown in the previous slides, increased spending by brands is projected in 2012. However, for all the increased spend and interest being showered on Facebook by most brands, they are getting little in return.Appendix NEXT
  • 92. Appendix WHY A SOCIAL RESET IS NEEDED? There’s a huge gap between where brands are investing their budgets and what channels yielded the best results. http://gim.ie/ywSwAppendix http://gim.ie/ywSv NEXT
  • 93. Appendix WHY A SOCIAL RESET IS NEEDED? There’s a huge gap between where brands are investing their budgets and what channels yielded the best results. Here’s another data set proving the same point. http://gim.ie/ywV6 http://gim.ie/ywVPAppendix NEXT
  • 94. Appendix WHY A SOCIAL RESET IS NEEDED? This social inflation is literally taking budget away from digital, proven, effective, mission critical initiatives like SEO and email.Appendix NEXT
  • 95. Appendix WHY A SOCIAL RESET IS NEEDED? Because CMO’s are taking actions based on misguided beliefs. Social media is not free. Social media is time intensive, and your time is valuable. As your presence grows you may need to pay for tools or additional staff, but at minimum you need to account for the value of the time you commit.Appendix BACK
  • 96. Appendix MY PERSONAL FEELINGS ON FACEBOOK... The point of this slide is to acknowledge that although I may personally dislike Facebook, I always push opinions to the side and dive in to the behaviors of my brands’ target audiences. Also, the quote on the right of the slide is part of a brilliant piece written by Alex Pasternack over on Vice’s blog, MOTHERBOARD, a few years ago. He beautifully articulated my opinion of Facebook back in 2010. You can check out his post here: http://bit.ly/wSks6qAppendix BACK
  • 97. Appendix WHAT IS AN 8-MILE SPEECH? In the final battle in the movie 8-Mile, Eminem preempts the bashing or trash-talking one could throw at him and eliminates his foes’ ammunition in the process (e.g. “i know everything he’s gotta say against me. i am white i am a fuckin bum. i do live in a trailer with my mom...”). This is my 8-mile pre-empt. I don’t know everything, and am not a digital prophet by any means. I purely am responding to experiences I’ve dealt with in the past few years and trying to make a topic I’m passionate about discussed or contemplated. I’m by no means a digital prophet. And I think titles like this one are asinine (cough AOL). My creativity is a combination of left and right brain. It comes from synthesizing, finding patterns, turning data into insight, listening to audiences, having an unconventional, “why not” attitude, actively seeking knowledgeable criticism, studying the ‘why” of human behavior, trusting my gut, and pretty much having no fear in failing. Most recently I was the Digital Planning Director, Creative I left in November 2011 to join a startup I’m psyched about. Innovations Director at TBWAChiatDay. I don’t have a Facebook page for 7 compelling reasons. I never had the urge to have one, status updates were akin to spam in my opinion, I can be OCD about privacy and corporations profiting off my data, a clean SEO is important to me, I felt posting updates felt narcissistic, and honestly, I’m not cool enough to have one.) For Facebook testing & observation I use an alias named, ‘Lola’. My Facebook-less life is akin to a drug dealer who doesn’t sample his or her product, but knows the habits of their audience well. (I’m not alone in my personal ‘anti-Facebook-socialness’ by the way–Google Mr. Max Palevsky). And no, I’m not condoning drug dealing, I’m highlighting a shared similarity. I only blog or tweet to discuss my personal, non-work passions. And I do so under an alias because unless you’re into the same passions it’s partially none of your business and nothing you’d care about and I tend to go by MetaVintage. At work, my passion is my client. Their brand. Not mine. I believe all agency and marketing folk should be immersed in their brand, not building a brand for themselves. I’m direct. I don’t shy away from a debate. The big BUT is that I absolutely accept and am open to being proven differently. Debates move things forward and make things better. Please refrain from bashing BrainSport’s website—there is a I have rationale for why they are the way they are. Hear me out first before you bash it. reason for everything I don’t hate Facebook and I’m not really anti-social. I’m not saying Facebook is terrible for every brand. Most of what Facebook is good for could be executed through a great CRM strategy more effectively and efficiently (enter my experience on Adobe). Also, I actually love that social puts a lot of power back in the people’s hands. I often speak in hyperbole for added dramatic effect. So when you see it in action throughout the deck, please bear with me.Appendix I am strongly opposed to marketing bullshit. And jargon and metaphors. This is not a hater speech. A hater speech relies on emotional appeal. I plan to come at you with tangible facts and anecdotes from real world experience. I have nothing to gain from giving this talk. Except the high possibility of getting a bunch of excruciating shit, push back and nitpicking. I have no doubt Facebook could give a shit about this talk. And I’m cool with that. BACK
  • 98. Appendix GOOD FACEBOOK PAIRINGS. Like I mentioned before, I believe Facebook can be compelling for certain brands or initiatives that share certain Facebook-friendly characteristics. Two recent examples–the backlash Rush Limbaugh advertisers recently experienced within social media as well as the the rapid spread of the Kony 2012 video. The phenomenon that was the Kony 2012 video was a success not simply because of Facebook, but because of the collective social effect it was designed to leverage– 86.6MM views on Vimeo and Youtube (and counting), a How unfortunate to be the community managers for the brands advertising on viral slingshot of tweets (many by highly followed celebs), Rush in early March. An absolutely blitz by angry consumers quickly convinced Facebook’s 1.4MM likes, the mass media picking it up, over 44 advertisers to withdrawal support from Rush’s show. For those brands who etc. The point is that without all of these other social didn’t act quickly, it got ugly. So ugly that most brands pulled public-facingAppendix platforms in conjunction with Facebook, Kony 2012 would comments and tweets in the short term and continued with their planned tweets most likely not have become the sensation it was. and posts as planned. It was absolutely cringe worthy as it was clear many brands weren’t ready to deal with the shitstorm. Rush has said salacious comments before, but it’s the wide spread adoption and inherent comfort level the masses feel towards social media, the fact it targeted women who are avid and vocal users of social, and the ease at which you could share your opinion directly with the brands you wanted to made this particular comment have more dire consequences. http://nyti.ms/HfQf8y http://read.bi/HalOAQ http://nyti.ms/HfQpNd http://abcn.ws/HfQ64X BACK
  • 99. Appendix THE IMPETUS FOR THIS PRESENTATION. This past November I took a leap of faith and went to a startup I truly think can help people. Prior to joining BrainSport, I was the Digital Strategy Director/ Creative Innovation Director at TBWAChiatDay. I had the unique privilege to work across some amazing global, Fortune 500 brands. I submitted this topic last July in pure frustration late one night from work. We had just been presented a deck from Facebook claiming brand sites would soon be replaced by Facebook. I was sick of writing presentations and strategies I didn’t believe in. They were becoming formulaic as we kept hitting up against the same anti-social realities most large brands encounter (moderation, legal restrictions on UGC, no staff to manage, etc.) I sat through multiple presentations from Facebook across multiple clients with a swapped client logo, the same vocabulary, the same false promises, the same self-centeredness, the same ideas and overstepping of bounds, and the same bully tactics. I’ve been lucky enough to work with and befriend some of the most genius and creative minds in the advertising and marketing world. I consistently witnessed their talent go down the drain as Facebook provided them with the ugliest, least inspiring, constricted and rigid canvas to paint upon. We were waisting their time on ideas that will never be worthy of more than a shallow ‘like.’ And I quite frankly who better? An overwhelming majority of so-called social media actually have never planned and executed a social campaign in their life. I’ve done more social than is probably healthy.Appendix BACK
  • 100. Appendix A FEW CAVEATS. These points are simply my opinions based on both past and present experiences. However, I wanted to highlight two points that go beyond opinion to fact. 1. Pew & Mashable Under the Spell: I’ve purposely stayed away from including research from Pew & Mashable within this deck because I believe Mashable has lost objectivity when it comes to Facebook as there hasn’t been a strong negative editorial on Facebook in months–months filled with changes and mistakes. Additionally, I wouldn’t be surprised if some of the ridiculous studies coming from Pew weren’t somehow funded silently by Facebook as they are doing a slew of research with social media and nearly every study showcases Facebook as a hero. All of their social studies live here if you’re interested in checking it out: http://bit.ly/H9RhV7. 2. Bad Data & Misinformation: Somewhat dovetailing with the point mentioned above, there is an incredible amount of misinformed data being syndicated online. Having been up to my ears in Facebook to an even greater degree for the past few months, it’s been startling for me to see what’s omitted in the research Facebook and their partners publish. I’ve purposefully tried to stick to the same few research sources throughout this presentation in an attempt to have a consistent baseline. I have a myriad of studies that are incongruous and/or only telling half the story. However, my point in highlighting my experience is to bring awareness and ensure others begin to pay closer attention to sources & methodology and to think deeper on what other questions my be left outstanding. One final note, Red Bull & Apple aren’t the only brands doing things correct. However, they are two great examples who have been doing it right before the Facebook-era, during Facebook’s era, beyond Facebook’s platform, and will continue to develop lasting bonds with their customers in the post-Facebook era.Appendix BACK
  • 101. REASON 1: WE’RE EXPERIENCING A SOCIAL-CARGO-CULT AND IT’S DISTORTING THE LANDSCAPE
  • 102. Appendix WHY IS UNDERSTANDING “CARGO CULT” IMPORTANT? I spent a majority of time here because the principle is somewhat laced throughout all five reasons to stop investing in Facebook. It gets to the root of why my definition of “social” or “engagement” will most likely be significantly different than the definitions provided by a brand, a marketer, a CMO, a Facebook sales rep, etc. Additionally, I believe looking at constructs of the past and applying them to the future is simply wise. It provides a means to navigate technological innovation when the new is so new that no one truly can be an expert–especially in moments where we cannot be certain how the masses will respond without actually giving them time to respond.Appendix NEXT
  • 103. Appendix A DEEPER DIVE INTO WHAT A CARGO CULT IS... What is a “cargo cult”? The term refers to the real-life ethnological phenomenon of what happens when a technologically primitive society comes in contact with a technologically more advanced society. The term is used to describe anyone else who imitates or mimics superficial features of a system (in this case, military logistics) and hopes to replicate the originals success, without any thought or understanding of the intrinsic workings of the system. (Think the Gods Must Be Crazy or Digital Non-Natives colliding with Digital Natives.) What is the most famous occurrence of cargo cult in history? During WWII, partly because of the limitations of aircraft of the time, several airbases were needed in the many South Pacific islands like Papua New Guinea and Melanesia so that bombers could refuel and such. The natives of these island lived primitively with absolutely no technology or outside influences. One day, out of the sky, planes began dropping the most modern, progressive innovations literally on top of them on a daily basis. The Allies shared this technology with the hospitable natives. However, when the war ended several years later, we left as suddenly as we had arrived. Military bases were abandoned and the steady flow of cargo which had altered the Islanders’ lives completely dried up. The men and women of Tanna Island had grown to enjoy the radios, trucks, boats, watches, iceboxes, medicine, Coca-Cola, canned meat, and candy, so they set into motion a plan to bring back the cargo. They believed they had surreptitiously learned the secrets of summoning the cargo by observing the practices of the American airmen, sailors and soldiers. So, they made an understandable mistake: they began mimicking the behavior of their military visitors and started crafting makeshift airfields, headphones, and even signal towers, out of things like bamboo and indigenous trees, eagerly waiting for another shipment. Renowned physicist Richard Feynman coined the phrase “cargo cult science” based on such cults. The term draws a metaphor for research which is polluted by the mind’s tendency to cherry-pick evidence that supports the desired outcome. Though it is tempting to look down on these islanders for their misguided assumptions, they are simply an extreme example of this very human bias. For them it was easier to believe that the control towers, headsets, and runways were the cause of the cargo-Appendix carrying airplanes rather than an effect, so they closed their minds to alternative explanations. What is the most modern day resurgence of Cargo Cult besides the one occurring within social media? Modern design, especially web design, information architecture and interaction design. In their worse misapplication, design patterns can lapse into a sort of Cargo Cult, in which past structures and layouts and flows are imitated and reproduced with no real understanding of how or why they worked in their original context. http://bit.ly/HEJziZ NEXT
  • 104. Appendix A DEEPER DIVE INTO WHAT A SOCIAL CARGO CULT IS... What is a Social Cargo Cult? The original Cargo Cults were people overawed by more advanced technology (in the famous case of World War II era aviation artifacts) who began imitating the forms of what they saw (wooden radio towers, torch-lit runways, counterfeit uniforms) in hopes of bringing the benefit ("cargo") that they had witnessed flowing from these same rituals and objects in the past. The modern-day Social Cargo Cults are the behaviors of people [brands, marketers and most advertising agencies] overawed by more advanced technology [in this case the surge of activity within social, Facebook jaw-dropping numbers, the overnight billionaires living the American Dream, and all the sexy VC & start-up sizzle that comes with it] who began imitating and mimicking the forms of what they saw [in this case the social jargon created by Facebook and so-called social media experts, meaningless, intangible vocabulary, words not backed up matching actions, efforts with no return communicated as successful, the hype in the press, the words other CMO’s are using, the rhetoric spewed in the speeches they are giving at social starf*cking conferences, etc.] in hopes of bringing the benefit [fame, awards, glory, peer recognition, career growth, earned media, and perhaps a true connection with fans] that they had witnessed flowing from these same rituals and objects in the past [by other brands in the past]. A Social Cargo Cult occurred when inexperienced social media ‘gurus’ and Facebook’s massive marketing tidal wave collided to create a social vocabulary adopted and mimicked by marketers. As a result, nearly every marketer can speak social, but most do not know what the hell they actually mean. Marketers are imitating or reproducing the social efforts of others with no real understanding of why it worked or what it meant in its original context.Appendix NEXT
  • 105. Appendix A SOCIAL CARGO CULT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THINGS LIKE: A brand opening a Facebook page and spending millions in advertising, but having an intern managing it. A brand creating a Facebook app that crops photos somehow, but that fans never touch. Yet, Adweek still features them in an article, and the CMO can point to it as evidence of their digital brilliance. A marketer speaking at an AMA conference about the benefits of social media although never successfully executing a social campaign ever and/or not having one metric besides likes to prove it. A Social Cargo Cult occurs when a marketer says their primary objective on Facebook is to drive sales (35%) but in reality they can’t prove that metric so they fall back to likes (60%). Or when a marketer says a critical marketing objective is building and fostering a community via engagement on Facebook, but less than 2% of a brand’s Facebook fans engage with their page on average. And it’s this... (P&G laying off a bunch of people because their CMO believes social is more efficient with little to no evidence on how besides pointing to Old Spice’s earned media impressions. On a side note, Facebook sourced success with P&G in an update to their IPO filing...very interesting indeed.)Appendix http://bit.ly/HGO0NS http://bit.ly/HEfI8G NEXT http://bit.ly/HGNpvF http://read.bi/HEJsnR http://read.bi/HBSfJu
  • 106. Appendix SYMPTOMS OF A SOCIAL CARGO CULT. Social simulation plagued by a lack of depth of knowledge, understanding, or experience by marketers requesting work from agencies, while at the same time turning to Facebook salespersons for social advice, has created a digital environment where most brands: Believe the same --> Facebook’s never-ending advice syndication and direct brand engagement coupled with inexperienced social gurus has led to the dissemination of consistent misinformation See the same --> Theoretical social experts’ ramblings take this misinformation and syndicates it to make matters worse Say the same --> So now we all begin to simulate what we see and read and begin speaking the same jargon Do the same --> Facebook’s inflexibility, the brand’s aversion to risk and loss of control, and emulation result in the same dumb, forced social executions Spend the same --> Bullied by Facebook, brands follow the platform’s recommendations, which don’t necessarily help generate revenue for their brand but do make Facebook a sick amount of moneyAppendix http://bit.ly/HS0BHG NEXT http://bit.ly/HS0Jal
  • 107. Appendix A DEEPER DIVE INTO HOW A SOCIAL CARGO CULT IMPACTS THE LANDSCAPE... While Facebook and so-called gurus taught marketing professionals in trendy conference keynotes, highly stylized infographics or breathtaking videos about "this crazy social networking thing the kids are doing", they neglected to mention anything about proper monetization strategies, making conversions and what exactly are the meeting points between conventional business advertising and social networking. Apparently just starting a Facebook account for your business is like some kind of magical totem that compels otherwise miserly customers into buying your product. Meaning, these particular business owners have the misconception that as soon as they sign up with various social media sites, customers are going to fall from the sky in droves and they’ll immediately be inundated with more business than they can handle. No clear boundary between adoption of conventions and imitation of conventions.The primary instances of Social Cargo Cults were distinguished by the fact that the things made by the members of the traditional society in imitation of the technologically more advanced invaders did not function, did not fulfill the same ends as the things of which they were imitations. Social Cargo Cult thinking in technology products might have worked in the past, when customers really didnt know any better and you could overwhelm them with slick marketing campaigns, but things are different now, thanks to online reviews and word-of-mouth. Yet they still try, wasting millions and millions on modern-day equivalents of wooden radar towers. Social Cargo Cult marketing often comes from the CEO, powerful business managers, big customers, and other annoying people who read an article in an in-flight magazine and think that makes them experts. Usually, cargo cult marketing is about following the herd -- other companies do it and get publicity for being leaders. "So our company should do the same! We need to have a Twitter account, or a Facebook page, or a mobile app!" Many companies launched Websites in 1995, blogs in 2005, and Second Life islands in 2007, as a result of cargo cult marketing. The problem with cargo cult thinking is that successful marketing requires follow-through. Twitter accounts need to be staffed and filled with content that people want to read, along with monitoring Twitter for mentions of your brands and responding to comments. The same is true for Facebook pages and blogs. Done right, these channels can be powerful tools, but if theyre simply set up and abandoned -- which is usually what happens with Social Cargo Cult -- potential customers will simply ignore your effort. Social Cargo Cult isnt entirely wasteful. It gets the CEO or other busybody off your back. Maybe youve already investigated Twitter and decided it wasnt useful for your company. But the CEO insists you need a Twitter account. You can spend a lot of time educating the CEO why Twitter is not a good fit for the company, or you can just set up the Twitter account and be done with it. You have to pick your battles. Social Cargo Cult can also generate publicity. You can get some good news coverage for beingAppendix one of the first companies to set up a Twitter account, Facebook feed, YouTube channel, or whatever the latest hot thing is, regardless of whether the hot thing proves useful in the long term. That still doesn’t mean you should do it because in the long run your investment will not covert to sales. Social Cargo Cult is responsible for a lot of starts and stops in the marketing world. It’s why Facebook attends internal marketing brainstorms. It’s irrational and illogical and frustrating as hell. It’s like we’re all speaking millions of social dialects. http://bit.ly/HS0BHG NEXT http://bit.ly/HS0Jal
  • 108. Appendix A DEEPER DIVE INTO SOCIAL HORSE SH*T... Repetitious Jargon: Every cult leader, drill sergeant, self-help guru and politician knows that if you want to quiet all of those pesky doubting thoughts in a crowd, get them to chant a repetitive phrase or slogan. Those are referred to as thought-stopping techniques, because for better or worse, they do exactly that. Why It Works: The “Analytical” part of your brain and the “Repetitive Task” part tend to operate in separate rooms. Shutting down those nagging voices in the head is helpful for stressed-out individuals, but even more helpful to a person who wants to shut down an audience full of nagging internal voices with social suggestions. Sounds Like: • Social by design • “F-Commerce” • Social at the core • Mission control (stolen from Gatorade) • Frictionless sharing • "Stories" instead of ads (Facebook’s new word for ads–reminds me of times when old school creatives say they are making :30 video or content instead of commercials) • Mission control • Social blueprints. • Social CMO With new jargon being circulated constantly and tons of marketers not understanding what it means but not wanting to show any sign of weakness, we get people talking the talk but failing to walk the walk. I think a lot of the pain and ambiguity surrounding social media would go away if we started using concrete, descriptive and maybe even tangible words. If we eliminate the jargon–of which a good majority is created and disseminated by Facebook–and start saying things that are crystal clear, we will be one-step closer to success. We need to not indoctrinate these words into our vocabulary and instead must carve out the words that are right for our brands.Appendix http://bit.ly/HRZQhR NEXT
  • 109. Appendix A DEEPER DIVE INTO SOCIAL HORSE SH*T... Misinformation Deluge: With mass amounts of data, little due diligence being followed by marketers and brands, and little qualified experience, there’s always two sides to every data point. At least this blogger was transparent, imagine how many are not... “Earlier this month I wrote how the promise of Facebook traffic has enticed millions of sites to use Facebook...Facebook provided me with the figures below...” http://bit.ly/HkdErO http://bit.ly/HOJ1qG Brand pages are seeing a drop in http://selnd.com/H0YwPc Brands get 46% more engagement, regardless of whether engagement with Facebook they’ve switched to Timeline. Timeline brand pages.Appendix http://bit.ly/HEfI8G http://slidesha.re/GY5uTg Even though Facebook constantly touts its massive audience, http://bit.ly/I1ZPfj only 50% of registered users are active. Academic studies prove Zuckerberg’s gut to be wrong. NEXT
  • 110. Appendix A DEEPER DIVE INTO SOCIAL HORSE SH*T... Theoretical Social Experts: When I was at TBWAChiatDay I would interview countless social media strategists and maybe one or two were qualified. With the demand for the social media gurus taking off and the fact it’s easy to lie about your experience, it truly takes one to know one who is not [socially savvy]. To go back to the Social Cargo Cult, these so-called experts are actively using straw words, communities, social media policies, AMA presentations, etc. All are meaningless, literally lacking in depth and these are the people many agencies are taking their marching orders from. It’s critical you hire the right people for social. They are directly interacting with potential and existing customers. Make sure you have the right filters in place so you can identify the have’s from the have nots.Appendix http://bit.ly/IGyXiD http://mz.cm/IGyq0b NEXT
  • 111. Appendix A DEEPER DIVE INTO SOCIAL HORSE SH*T... Safe Bets: With Facebook’s rigid requirements, brands do not have many opportunities to customize their efforts or develop rich, creative experiences. Additionally, CMO’s are scared to dance too far outside the generally agreed upon social comfort zone and/or the limits imposed on them by their legal team. Yes, I will give you the Old Spice response videos. They were a smart and creative use of social media, but it’s been nearly two years since they launched and we still source it as a best practice. Why aren’t there new creative executions to source? Instead, we’ve been flooded by a bevy of boring share your stories, asinine daily posts, ridiculous branded apps like NesCafe Your Face, Orangina Your Originals, Museum of Me, or some variation of Elf Yourself. Just typing this slide has bored the sh*t out of me. You get the point. Enough said.Appendix http://bit.ly/HUkV0V NEXT
  • 112. Appendix A DEEPER DIVE INTO SOCIAL HORSE SH*T... Bully Tactics: Facebook recently unveiled a variety of best practices for brands to follow at fMC in February 2012. If you dig into the data, my recommendation would be to take their best practices with a grain of salt. They were created with Facebook’s best revenue-based intentions in mind–not brands or their fans. According to Facebook, you have to be a frequent content producer to be relevant in social, which is absurd. How many brands should be content producers? How about they invest in creating a great product and great How convenient? customer service? http://on.fb.me/HHCrm3 http://bit.ly/HYuJmmAppendix The only source Facebook provided for their approach to measurement is the same company they are in a relationship with...seems like the potential for bias is high. NEXT http://bit.ly/IFZuiD http://on.fb.me/IFZy1T
  • 113. Appendix MORE EXAMPLES OF SOCIAL SLUDGE: Social Sludge is the amazingly depressing layer of social stickiness on top of an ocean of amazingly brilliant, exciting, funny, gross, experiences, content, tools, etc. called the internet. Layers of likes and unwanted updates and lack-luster user-generated content spammed everywhere covers it up. I often wished for a button where I could shut it all off completely. I want my beautiful, “pristine” Internet back. (If one day, Facebook did indeed all go away, the Internet would still be there, people would still visit it, and it would be full of niche social communities to suit customer passions. I believe some senior marketing and advertising executives think the Internet would disappear if Facebook ever went away.)Appendix  *I realize I’m creating my own jargon by the way. However, in some instances I’ve found really hyperbolic visual metaphors are NEXT helpful in communicating to marketers across all of their social dialects. I will try to keep them to a minimum.
  • 114. Appendix THOSE SAFE FROM THE STORM: My experience led me to believe brands that do Facebook well tend to do everything well on other social platforms too. Just to make sure, I double checked and charted out the social footprints for the following brands: Starbucks, Coca Cola, Oreo, Disney, MTV, Whole Foods, Threadless, Pixar, Skittles, Red Bull, Converse, Lady Gaga, YouTube, Victoria’s Secret, Eminem, Rihanna, House (the TV show) and iTunes. Sure these brands live a large life on Facebook, but if you take the time to dive into the details, they also have healthy presences on at least five or more of the following: Twitter, Google+, YouTuBe, Vimeo, Image Sharing Sites, Pinterest, Company Blog, Niche, Interest-Based Communities, Geo-Location Communities, & their Brand Website. Why? They’re spending time improving the product, following their audience’s lead, not kissing the ass of their boss or the marketing/advertising industry. They are investing in analytic platforms, CRM and customer service integration, content creation, etc. Lady Gaga doesn’t just have a Facebook page. She has no rule book. No terrible social experts to drag her down. She’s done Gilt and Etsy. She may even be overly social saturated at this point, but the point is I’m willing to bet she would never but all of her social eggs in Facebook’s basket.Appendix Socialbakers.com, 2/26/12 BACK
  • 115. REASON 2: YOU DON’T OWN IT, IT’S NOT YOURS, AND IT WILL NEVER PUT YOU FIRST, EVER
  • 116. Appendix YOU DON’T OWN IT. IT’S NOT YOURS. Do you want to base your community efforts upon a platform over which you have no control, which has one of the lowest response rates in history, where most of your updates won’t been seen by the majority of your audience, where few individuals meaningfully interact with each other on branded pages, with little demonstrable ROI, and where the owner can shift the ground beneath your feet at any moment without warning? All of the brand interaction information stays on their servers. You dont know the longevity of Facebook. They could go away, just like MySpace, and so could everything that occurred on the platform (at least for now). It’s like a renting an apartment with Facebook as your landlord when you could easily own your own house. Every action, piece of content, conversation could disappear in a day, and yet we think investing a lion’s share of social spend in Facebook (e.g. maintenance and development) is a smart business decision. At best, you’ll only be left with the data that you have managed to migrate (which most brands haven’t given thought to). The rest – and it will probably be the lion’s share – will be lost to the ether. You will have to hope that the goodwill you’ll have built up will stay with your fans and followers, and that perhaps they’ll take the time to find you and to tune into you via some other channel. But the point is that you have little control over this data.  As Facebook grows, and as fan counts increase, it is increasingly apparent that we need to do more to transform registered Facebook users into registered X brand users/ subscribers. Often brands, list their social extensions under the title of owned media. The last thing a Facebook page should be considered is owned media...it should be moved over to paid at the very least.Appendix http://bit.ly/JlfDeu NEXT
  • 117. Appendix FIRST, SOME SERVER 101 The process of servers is something like this: you enter a URL (link) on your web browser, the web browser sends a request to the server, the server sends the data for the webpage back. Then your web browser reads the code and shows the page on your computer screen. (The actual process is a bit more complex than this involved DNS, IP, protocols, etc.) We dont have to own a server to host data. Some companies offer server rental—hosting service. Large companies (Google, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, etc.) prefer to store their data on their own servers due to security purpose and also their data is too much for those web hosting companies to handle. When you upload data to the web, the data will be kept on the server of the service (e.g. You upload your photo on Facebook, your photo will be store somewhere in Facebooks server).Appendix http://tcrn.ch/HTT5xS http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Server_(computing) NEXT
  • 118. Appendix YOU DON’T OWN IT. IT’S NOT YOURS. Facebook is pretty specific on explaining who owns the content between the user and Facebook, but it does not say a lot regarding a third party: the brand. If you rely on Facebook for your community platform, then you also rely on them to disclose data that is needed to measure ROI.  The reason why Facebook does not allow you to harvest data is simple - it belongs to them and has a value. They want to use it for targeted advertising and they simply don’t want you to have it. The only part of ROI you can really measure is cost savings from using networks to share content instead of using paid media. This element of ROI may be enough to justify your basic costs for managing the FB page, but it is not the whole picture. Only a few things are patently clear (at least if you search for it), which I’ve highlighted to the right. I’m completely open to be proven wrong but, so please share any information and I’ll be happy to update.Appendix https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms http://on.fb.me/HTTdxu NEXT
  • 119. Appendix YOU DON’T OWN IT. IT’S NOT YOURS. Even users are having a tough time getting their own data from Facebook:Appendix http://bit.ly/JyazSy BACK
  • 120. REASON 3: EXPECTATION HAS FAILED TO LIVE UP TO THE REALITY
  • 121. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Free & Easy // Expensive & Hard Work Facebook is seemingly fun for CMO’s right until they approve a campaign or program. The hard, extremely detailed, unbearable at times, pain in the ass of bringing a Facebook page and/or idea to life –and keeping it alive– is an often thankless job. Most clients passively say “not it” and delegate to the lowest level of staff who isn’t equipped to handle the task at hand. (Just look at the effect on 1-800-Flowers and Carbonite both during and post the Rush Limbaugh fiasco.) FREE & EASY EXPENSIVE & HARD WORK Facebook is cost-efficient for my brand. Social done right is time consuming–and quite frequently– In theory the idea of transparency is romantic and beautiful. Like a pain in the ass. To be fan-worthy or helpful a brand not a couple who says their relationship is effortless. Like a model only needs an appetite for risk, but also loads of content who says they’re blessed with a great metabolism. For a brand to and/or a huge staff to dive into the details and respond to be transparent on Facebook (for real--actually answering and providing insightful info) you have to be willing to walk around the every possible PR disaster in real-time—all are not free. world with toilet paper on your shoe and when you finally notice the cotton gift you’ve been dragging, you brazenly walk on • It’s like direct response in real-time, but with a live audience. committed to your mission and willing to shake off the present Without a sound staff and process you’ll be set up to fail and awkwardness or uncomfortableness. Most do not have the risk the effects of a negative word-of-mouth reverb bravado nor the staff/ processes to pull this off effectively. • The implications around the new “story” ads immediately conjure nightmares for most clients • Clients now need to pay to reach a majority of their Facebook fan base through the Reach Generator • This may be the one point in which Facebook and I agree as they stated at the fMC that “Social at scale will not be free.” All of this might be worth it if your audience lives and breathes Facebook, or you’re a non-profit, or have large budgets to spend in a quest to differentiate against the competition, for example. However, most of the time starting and perfecting Twitter or a corporate blog can be a better, more manageable call.Appendix http://bit.ly/Ifot8r BACK
  • 122. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Why Not? // Oh Sh!t WHY NOT? OH SH!T Being on Facebook is a no brainer with its huge user base, Facebook’s viral reach is compelling. Although it can amplify the free real estate, and viral reach. positive quickly, it also can turn one negative comment into an echo chamber of compounding complaints and inescapable damage. Without the right staff, you’re risking a PR nightmare. • Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that angry user- generated comments on Internet sites can further perpetuate negative perceptions of an organization undergoing the crisis. • The Verde Group, in conjunction with the Baker Retailing Initiative at the Wharton School of Business, found that 31% of dissatisfied customers tell others about their problems (compared to our 29%), and that they tell on average 4 other individuals about their negative experience (compared to our 4.2). Likewise, they found that roughly 64% (compared to our 68%) of customers who are recipients of negative word of mouth about a specific vendor will choose to shop elsewhereAppendix http://bit.ly/GTpAxj http://bit.ly/H40nOD http://bit.ly/HUeg2Y http://bit.ly/JiscXd NEXT http://gim.ie/yf5z
  • 123. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Why Not? // Oh Sh!t More evidence most brands aren’t ready for the full depth and breadth of responsibility that accompanies a Facebook page:Appendix http://bit.ly/HUdXoI BACK
  • 124. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Authentic Community // Forced Relationship Facebook communities have become an assault of fake smiles, projected lifestyles, a engagement akin to Groupon, but requiring more commitment and staff. AUTHENTIC COMMUNITY FORCED RELATIONSHIP When we discuss Facebook and branded communities Facebook Facebook brand pages are filled with people who liked and/or our industry typically refer to the hypothetical, utopian their page to enter a sweepstake and/or to get discounts Facebook brand page. On this page we dream of a dedicated and exclusive offers. This disconnect between fan and community full of your brand’s fans, living the Big Pimping lifestyle most brands’ behavior on Facebook leaves me with that with a wonderful two-way dialogue, insider information, and a true same feeling I have when someone attempts to high five and mutual value exchange between brand and fan. me and a sick sort of pain juts in my gut and I sort of blush in awkward anticipation and then not to seem rude I actually proceed to reciprocate the high-five in a rush to get it over with as quickly as possibly but then we miss altogether and try again and its a whole-lot-a-awful. Evidence can be found on the following seven pages.Appendix NEXT
  • 125. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Authentic Community // Forced Relationship Truth is, not everyone can be cool [socially] and for those who are not, you have Facebook...and amazing low engagement rates. Case in point #1 & 2: Studies show that less than 1 percent of your “Daily Active Users” on Facebook are engaging your contentAppendix http://bit.ly/IfqRMD http://bit.ly/GPsulF http://tnw.co/GPwUJ5 In another study, researchers looked at People Talking About This, a Facebook metric, for the top 200 brands on Facebook over a six-week period back in October and they found the percentage of “People Talking About This”  to be 1.3%.   NEXT
  • 126. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Authentic Community // Forced Relationship Facebook communities have become an assault of fake smiles, projected lifestyles, a engagement akin to groupon but requiring more commitment and staff. Truth is, not everyone can be cool [socially] and for those who are not, you have Facebook...and amazing low engagement rates. Case in point #3: “Engagement on the Facebook walls of leading brands is down 22%. Brands arent playing for the long term. Engagement is the crown jewel of a community marketer. Its always talked about and drives the relevance and power of the platform. We reviewed public engagement data for 300 of the top brands on Facebook over a one-year period starting in July 2010. The results show a clear decline in average engagement.” –Ad Age August 2011Appendix http://bit.ly/JyRjo9 NEXT
  • 127. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Authentic Community // Forced Relationship There’s a sort of social dysmorphia that occurs when you compare why brands think fans like their page vs. why the fans actually fan their pages...and there’s multiple studies to prove it. Case in point #1:Appendix http://bit.ly/I4g2D0 NEXT
  • 128. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Authentic Community // Forced Relationship There’s a sort of social dysmorphia that occurs when you compare why brands think fans like their page vs. why the fans actually fan their pages...and there’s multiple studies to prove it. Case in point #2: Case in point #1:Appendix http://bit.ly/Ifot8r http://bit.ly/GPsulF NEXT
  • 129. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Authentic Community // Forced Relationship Weirdly enough, marketers seem to understand the primary means fans are contacting brands...and it’s not social.Appendix http://bit.ly/Ifot8r NEXT
  • 130. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Authentic Community // Forced Relationship More proof that fan motivation more closely resembles coupon.com than a community...Appendix http://bit.ly/Ifot8r NEXT
  • 131. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Authentic Community // Forced Relationship Additionally proof that creating a Facebook page full of fans does not guarantee loyalty or future purchases...Appendix BACK
  • 132. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Social Figured Out // Process on Paper Clearly, marketers are increasingly realizing the essential role that social media—and engaging content for those media—must play in any brand campaign. However, it is just as clear that marketers are still struggling to identify best practices in the cluttered and often confounding space. All of which might explain why a majority of companies (64%) aren’t yet requiring definitive measurable ROI to justify their social media budgets. WE HAVE SOCIAL FIGURED OUT WE HAVE A PROCESS ON PAPER Only 9% of surveyed organizations have full-time positions dedicated to managing social media responsibilities 90% include those as part of someone’s overall responsibilities 85% of companies are handling their social media efforts internallyAppendix http://bit.ly/GTheFS BACK
  • 133. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Facebook Fans // Facebook...the F*ck If I Know Facebook fans on average tend to be complainers, the outer fringe, discount seekers, commenters, the lonely, or extreme loyalists (who would purchase a product with or without a Facebook page). FACEBOOK FANS FACEBOOK...THE F*CK IF I KNOW My Facebook fans are my target audience. My Facebook fans are not my target audience. Recent ComScore research confirm that that, “...Those people that seek you or find you or like you in a social environment are often very different from the target [brands] you’ve been thinking about.”Appendix http://on.mash.to/IfuJgn BACK
  • 134. Appendix EXPECTATION VS. REALITY: Honest, Transparent & Authentic // Opportunistically Honest, Transparent & Authentic In theory the idea of transparency is fantastic. However, to authentically execute, a brand must be willing to embrace risk, occasionally placing their brand in a negative light, and admitting error when necessary. It’s not hard, it just take nerves of steel–something that CMO’s with short shelf lives do not want to contend with. OPPORTUNISTICALLY HONEST, TRANSPARENT & AUTHENTIC HONEST, TRANSPARENT & AUTHENTIC The study found that in 2011, 94% of the 50 top brands’ Facebook pages directed users to a one-way communication page, such as a tab or a closed Facebook wall that didn’t allow consumers to initiate a conversation. This was up from 91% of the top 50 brands’ pages in 2010. Additionally, 56% of those brands did not respond to a single customer comment on their Facebook page in 2011; the same percentage of non-responses as in 2010. While consumers’ rate of interaction with non-promotional messages clearly showed what content fans preferred, brands did not pick up on the feedback—only 13% of posts from brands were personal or customer-centric. More often—61% of the time—posts were promotional, and, demonstrating consumers’ disinterest in such content, these posts received only 11% of all consumer responses.Appendix BACK
  • 135. REASON 4: LEGALLY AND/OR STRUCTURALLY YOU’RE PROBABLY F*CKED
  • 136. Appendix WHAT IS THIS CHART MEANT TO SHOW? Two of the most critical pieces of a successfully functioning "social" brand, is (1) a modern legal team with an understanding and flexibility that lends itself to the space and (2) and a foundational structure with staff, systems, experience, understanding, and an organizationally-wide "social" acceptance. My pig flying zone is meant to capture this utopian land where a marketing team or brand is structured adequately for "social" initiatives while at the same time enjoys the freedom of a trusting legal team. Very few, if any, brands are in the pig flying zone. (However, if you can prove me wrong please make your case. Id love to include as an example of someone doing it right.) For example, a brand flying in the pig zone does not… • Live social initiative to social initiative • Moderate (at any level) • Tack on social to an employees existing set of duties • Have a team of three of less • Approve a creative idea, but then later alter it significantly to appease legal • Run posts past legal first • Write out a bunch of planned Facebook posts weeks or even months in advance and rigidly adheres to the syndication of this approved contentAppendix The next few slides demonstrate my point through non-biased facts and figures and deeper explanations. Enjoy! NEXT
  • 137. Appendix HONESTY AROUND RESOURCE & TRANSPARENCY ISSUES FROM CMO’S IS ABUNDANT. STRUCTURAL PROBLEM LEGAL PROBLEM Spending millions in social without having the right Social is a risky business. A conservative legal sized team staffed is like wearing flip-flops with a department with final say over marketing will kill a couture gown. brand’s ability to be social. Heavy moderation and restrictions on UGC (user-generated content) The foundational structure of an organization and reduce interactions to a fake and cursory their partner agencies sets them up for failure. experiences. Whether staffing is inadequate, employees lack required skills, budgets are too small, antiquated Success in social takes a confidence and a corporate hierarchy is inefficient, or institutional transparency that could withstand walking around processes are slow-meaning make it nearly with toilet paper on your shoe all day, every day. impossible for brands–especially mature brands– to programmatically attack social. As a result most For me, moderation is not a good idea in social. If brands live initiative to initiate, not thinking into the someone slams your brand and you have a future. Facebook page, you have to deal with it. If a person interacts with your brand in a racist or sexist way Brands can’t live campaign to campaign. It’s a long you still have to deal, but you can more easily marathon and everything should weave together diffuse. and reinforce each other. This tends to happen organically for a brand that clearly stand for With a young, small brand I tend to think acting fully something and clearly separates what they could open and transparent is best. Start-ups and non- do from what they should do. profits tend to act and then beg for forgiveness later. With an older, larger brand legal concerns areAppendix warranted and you need to clearly define the play- box your creative and PR partners can play within before you brief. http://bit.ly/Ifot8r NEXT
  • 138. Appendix SOCIAL CARGO CULT REARS IT’S UGLY HEAD AGAIN. I can nearly guarantee that most brands have no clue what to do next with the community they’ve built. I’ve seen 30 or some folks involved from multiple departments and partner agencies focused on one brand, all in the hopes of launching some social stunt meant to generate millions of likes or a Facebook branded-application meant to become viral. Nearly every time, the team barely gets through the effort alive and the results dodn’t live up to the hype (or the amount of work entailed). Why does this phenomenon consistently occur with regards to social initiatives? Here’s my theory: Social media requires a ton of work, effort, dedication, an understanding of both the macro strategy and the willingness to dive into the details. (You almost need to be a little ADD to really get social media.) Its like managing a working farm, which is exhausting, hard work with no huge crescendo. Instead progress, growth, and success are all slow burns. The work never ends and it’s often thankless and unglamorous. So what do CMO’s do? They approve a creative idea and basque in the glory of its potential and cite the idea when they demonstrate their social savviness at global marketing conferences. They ignore the details, the mechanics, the known legal issues, the gears that keep an initiative moving, and delegate to those beneath. These pain in the ass issues are what executive clients block out as they take their Facebook funded trip to Napa and dump the hard, painful execution in the hands of their employees –hands which are completely tied.Appendix As a result, the approved creative idea and what actually gets through legal are often two very different things. They socially live initiative to initiate, shiny bauble to shiny bauble, not thinking into the future. http://gim.ie/yFgP NEXT
  • 139. Appendix LEGALLY OR STRUCTURALLY YOU’RE PROBABLY F*CKED. You don’t have to take my word on it. Marketers will even admit privately (not publicly) social and its ramifications on their company have been and continue to be huge pains in the ass.Appendix ibm.com/cmostudy NEXT
  • 140. Appendix LEGALLY OR STRUCTURALLY YOU’RE PROBABLY F*CKED. 95% Of Facebook Wall Posts Not Answered By Brands If social media is a conversation, and we’re supposed to listen and respond to consumers in real-time, then this is bad social business. If a brand cannot get responses cleared by their legal people and they don’t have the structure to manage flare-ups easily, they’re probably f*cked. The telecommunications and airline sectors had the highest rates of answered wall posts, but even those were woefully low, at 26% and 28%, respectively.   Information in social media spreads extremely fast. If a brand doesn’t respond, they permit others to take over their brand’s messaging. Perhaps, Facebook’s new private messaging capability will help these numbers increase, but it will come at the expense of the openness of the conversation.Appendix http://bit.ly/GPu2Mj http://bit.ly/H2o3ph NEXT
  • 141. Appendix COULD THIS BE ONE AREA WHERE FACEBOOK & I AGREE? Perhaps we do agree on this point. Facebook printed a handy guide, including the org chart below, as a takeaway from their fMC conference in February. It’s meant to show businesses how they should manage social and by social they mean Facebook. I wonder if they thought about the fact brands staffing up may mean less advertising spend?Appendix http://bit.ly/HO8noV NEXT
  • 142. Appendix SOME MORE LEGAL EVIDENCE... Legal allows marketing teams to listen and have private conversations in controlled customer panels. However, if you’re seeking true engagement, good luck. Embarking in the land of user participation or self- generated content is a legal team’s worst nightmare. The only path forward for brands, in my opinion, is to find legal specialists who understand social and aren’t learning as they go. (I often hear brands say, “we’re hiring social stewards to spread the social gospel”...good luck with that as well. Unless the social steward has a contract that prevents firing for 2+ years, no one worth their salt would want to take the job. These folks will be the fall people for any social screw-up...which is bound to happen at some point. Unless legal changes, no company-wide progress will be gained long-term.)Appendix ibm.com/cmostudy http://bit.ly/GThIvP NEXT
  • 143. Appendix SOME MORE STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE... Considering brands were understaffed in 2010, these lackluster percentages are not significant enough to effect business. It’s another example of marketing wanting to speak social to their colleagues to sound modern and progressive, but not wanting to invest and actually do social properly.Appendix NEXT BACK
  • 144. Appendix A GREAT PIECE DEMONSTRATING THE COMPLEXITY AND HIGH COST OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING...Appendix http://bit.ly/HMH4KS NEXT
  • 145. Appendix SOME MORE STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE... Brands even admit their top challenge is too few resources, because it’s hard to invest without a tangible, demonstrable return. My favorite of course.Appendix http://bit.ly/H4aAKW NEXT
  • 146. Appendix SOME MORE STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE... And yet more honesty around resource issues from brands...Appendix ibm.com/cmostudy NEXT
  • 147. Appendix SOME MORE STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE... Please don’t get me wrong, I don’t believe what I’m saying is revolutionary. Brands seem to know they need staff. The only problem is they are saying what they’d like to do without any follow-through. It’s yet another demonstration of a social cargo cult. It’s as if they’ve become masters of saying the right thing that they’ve become comfortable substituting action with intent.Appendix http://bit.ly/GThIvP NEXT
  • 148. Appendix SOME MORE STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE... Sounds promising but I’ll believe it when I see it. Staffing up on the digital side alienates and threatens the old- school contingent resulting in mountains of politics and playing-nice–preventing true change from occurring long-term. I can count on one-hand the number of mature, legacy brands who have embraced digital experts and empowered them to do the things they needed to do. (Sure sounds promising!) “We are reprioritizing skill sets and org structures within our marketing teams to better align with the transformation we are seeing in how we communicateAppendix with consumers–namely through digital channels.” http://bit.ly/GThIvP NEXT
  • 149. Appendix SOME MORE STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE... Most CMOs plan to deploy new technologies to grapple with big data, but most CMO’s are unprepared to manage the impact of key changes in the marketing arena.Appendix ibm.com/cmostudy NEXT
  • 150. Appendix SOME MORE STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE... Here are similar results to the page before, but cited from a different study.Appendix http://gim.ie/yw0D NEXT
  • 151. Appendix SOME MORE STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE... This would scare me if I was a present-day CMO with no retirement in sight. Successful CMO’s will hire experts (perhaps even smarter than themselves) to help them transform into a digitally savvy brand. I believe a CMO’s fear of not-knowing and becoming obsolete results in a failure to invest and hinders the long-term growth and longevity of their brands/ products.Appendix http://bit.ly/HMwyHF BACK
  • 152. REASON 5: FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE PATH TO IPO
  • 153. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. Did you feel an insane amount of pressure from Facebook over the last six months or so? You can thank their IPO filing for that. With a myopic eye on valuation, Facebook’s salespersons put a full-court-press on brands and their agencies. With Facebook missing internal revenue projections by $500 million, the last thing on Facebook’s mind is their users. Their strategic, strong and consistent push on C-Level marketers and advertising ‘experts’ has been impressive and painful at the same time, often lacking insight, creativity or strategy. Many brands have also experienced feedback from Facebook that oversteps the bounds of a vendor/ client relationship. Could you imagine NBC being invited to critical marketing strategy meetings for Fortune 500 brands? Could you imagine NBC criticizing and chastising the marketers for their lack of creative & social savvy? Could you imagine NBC changing the screen size and resolution and dimension every few months or so?Appendix NEXT BACK
  • 154. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. “Declined to comment” is a typical Facebook response to press questions regarding tough issues and I’m not talking about info they shouldn’t tell their audience in fear of revealing corporate competitive secrets. I’m talking about things like privacy, increased fees for brands, omitted data sharing, off the record relationships with “study” publishers, etc. I’m talking about a those moments where Facebook is not in control and adopts a “no comment” policy to tough questions from reporters. It’s easy to publish and syndicate answers, it’s harder to answer them. For as much data as Facebook is tracking, the public certainly sees very little of it. And when we do, it’s typically strategically self- serving. For such an open company, they sure say ‘no comment’ a lot. Zuckerberg’s IPO Letter:Appendix http://usat.ly/Ig0K9J http://bit.ly/HIIcR0 http://read.bi/Ig1r2M NEXT
  • 155. AppendixAND FOR THE RECORD, PEOPLE DO NOT WANT TO BE OPEN. http://gim.ie/yDWU NEXT
  • 156. AppendixAND FOR THE RECORD, PEOPLE DO NOT WANT TO BE OPEN. http://gim.ie/yDWU NEXT
  • 157. AppendixAND FOR THE RECORD, PEOPLE DO NOT WANT TO BE OPEN. http://gim.ie/yDWU BACK BACK
  • 158. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. Seems like Facebook’s mission statement is cancelled out by its restrictive branded app policies.Appendix BACK http://on.fb.me/IDKfG8 http://bit.ly/HAz9QQ
  • 159. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. Facebook touts its strong mobile presence, while brands cast a blind eye to the fact they’ve missed massive audiences especially over the past 2.5 years. According to their IPO filing: Facebook reports 845 million Thats’s 425 million missed Monthly Active Users (MAUs) opportunities to reach Facebook users in December 2011 only. 57% of monthly active users Think of all the missed opportunities since Facebook’s visit Facebook every day and inception in 2007. (The new mobile ‘deals‘ advertising they are classified as Daily Active announced at fMC is not a true solution unless you think Users (DAUs) coupons are consistently compelling.) It’s like running a TVAppendix spot and having a black screen 50% of the time. 425 million of those monthly Now think of the demographic you’re missing. The group of active users (~50%) used people who log into Facebook through mobile. Wish Facebook would release more information about them. I Facebook mobile products in have a feeling they are tech-savvy and you wish you could December, 2011 reach them. http://gim.ie/zrEQ BACK http://gim.ie/BqEx http://tcrn.ch/zWYiVx http://1.usa.gov/HyMtcQ
  • 160. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. “The recent trend toward social readers and other types of frictionless sharing may at first glance seem innocuous, if inane. But it has occurred The term became popularized following Mark Zuckerbergs just as privacy advocates are pushing to create more privacy protections announcement at the F8 developers conference in 2011 in for readers through state laws, and may result in the loss of VPPA, the which he described developments to Facebook which one federal law that protects privacy in content consumption. And users would allow "real-time serendipity in a friction-less may not understand that sharing what they read with friends may mean experience.” sharing what they read with the government, as well. That is a whole lot more serious than just annoying your friends with your taste for celebrity gossip. Indeed, it may be another step toward the death of the Fourth Amendment by a thousand cuts.” - The Wake Forest Law Review Facebook’s Privacy Policy was recently renamed ‘Data Use’ policy.Appendix http://bit.ly/Huca8z http://bit.ly/HucfZN http://bit.ly/Iix4Ml http://zd.net/H0Zz1J BACK
  • 161. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. Forrester Research Analyst Sucharita Mulpuru told Bloomberg: “There was a lot of anticipation that Facebook would turn into a new destination, a store, a place where people would shop. But it was like trying to sell stuff to people while they’re hanging out with their friends at the bar. Facebook would not comment on the matter when we asked.” Gap, Nordstrom, J.C. Penny, Gamespot Close Facebook Storefronts Just as fast as they went up, f-commerce storefronts silently closed with little to no press attention or response from Facebook.Appendix http://bit.ly/Iwr6rB BACK http://www.allfacebook.com/facebook-commerce-exit-2012-02 http://bit.ly/IwrgPI
  • 162. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. Ignore the fact that the data Facebook showcases below is somewhat meaningless as it discusses time spent on home pages and not conversion or interaction rates, the truth of the matter is people are finding brands on social to be less desirable than ever before.Appendix http://bit.ly/GTpAxj NEXT http://scr.bi/IiYZNA
  • 163. AppendixAND FOR THE RECORD, FANS ARE FATIGUING... http://bit.ly/Hr8WnD NEXT
  • 164. AppendixAND FOR THE RECORD, FANS ARE FATIGUING... http://bit.ly/Hr8PbD NEXT
  • 165. AppendixBUT YOU CAN’T JUST BLAME FACEBOOK.BRANDS ARE AT FAULT AS WELL. http://bit.ly/GPv375 BACK
  • 166. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. UPDATE: Spotify has added a "private listening" mode to counter complaints about the automatic sharing of playlists on Facebook. "Were rolling out a new client as we speak where you can temporarily hide your guilty pleasures. It works like a browsers private mode," tweeted Daniel Ek, CEO and founder of Spotify. "We call it private listening and you can find it in the Spotify/File menu and toggle it on/off," he added. Spotify will stop sharing what you listen to until you turn it off or until the next time you log on, a spokeswoman from Spotify explained. "Many of our users have told us that they like to share what theyre listening to, but also want an easy way to hide their occasional guilty pleasures," the spokeswoman said. I wonder if forcing Spotify users to have a Facebook account was Facebook or Spotify’s idea when they defined the terms of their “partnership”?Appendix http://on.msnbc.com/HieJf4 BACK http://bit.ly/Hig1qw http://bit.ly/HicXKU
  • 167. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. Bugs, poor documentation, a never-ending changes in the API, and other headaches (although they’ve recently Elliot Schrage, vice president of communications and public policy at improved documentation) make Facebook’s API not well Facebook stated, “We believe we have one of the most developer- liked. Moreover, developers see Google as a bigger growth friendly platforms on the Internet.” area than Facebook given it’s wide spectrum of product offerings. Schrage and developers seem to have differing opinions.Appendix http://bit.ly/Hib3dl http://bit.ly/H5MRhl http://on.mash.to/H448ng BACK
  • 168. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. I could create a whole separate deck on the inaccuracy of this idiotic and http://bit.ly/Hkfwkt misinformed declaration by Facebook.Appendix http://cnet.co/HkeWmN BACK
  • 169. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. Text It’s impossible to be the best referral of traffic and the site with the longest engagement rates. Something has to give.Appendix http://bit.ly/HkeiFI http://bit.ly/HOGsVr http://bit.ly/HkdXmB http://bit.ly/HOJgSB BACK
  • 170. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. TBD Don’t believe everything you read. Unless you have some experience under your belt, you will really never know for sure.Appendix http://bit.ly/HkdErO BACK http://bit.ly/HOJ1qG
  • 171. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. The age of privacy is over according to Zuckerberg and Facebook is simply adjusting to this new social norm. In a six-minute interview on stage with TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington, Zuckerberg spent 60 But recent papers from Harvard, Berkeley and University of seconds talking about Facebooks privacy policies. He states, “"And then Pennsylvania researchers show that kids and young adults in the last 5 or 6 years, blogging has taken off in a huge way and all these do want to keep information private. They just aren’t as different services that have people sharing all this information. People savvy about privacy laws, and kids and teens in particular have really gotten comfortable not only sharing more information and are concerned about a specific type of privacy — namely different kinds, but more openly and with more people. That social norm whether parents, teachers and other adults are viewing is just something that has evolved over time...We view it as our role in the their information. system to constantly be innovating and be updating what our system is to reflect what the current social norms are.” Facebook has more data than it knows what to do with, and yet a comment like this from Zuckerberg proves they are disregarding the data if it doesn’t suit their commercial interests.Appendix http://bit.ly/I1ZPfj http://slidesha.re/GY5uTg BACK
  • 172. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. I’m not sure my brand should be investing millions of dollars in a platform who claims to be a destination for lightweight interactions. . http://slidesha.re/GY5uTgAppendix NEXT
  • 173. AppendixA CLOSER LOOK AT SOCIAL ROI.Data is a pain in the ass for CMO’s. NEXT
  • 174. AppendixA CLOSER LOOK AT SOCIAL ROI.But marketers see value in gauging success via ROI (and data). ibm.com/cmostudy http://bit.ly/GPx4jO NEXT http://bit.ly/I2ibZb
  • 175. AppendixA CLOSER LOOK AT SOCIAL ROI.But marketers can’t decide if social is effective. They are struggling to measure it. NEXT
  • 176. AppendixA CLOSER LOOK AT SOCIAL ROI.Some marketers claim to be investing in tracking ROI, but most are adopting the ignorance is bliss strategy. NEXT
  • 177. AppendixA CLOSER LOOK AT SOCIAL ROI.And what they measure are more lightweight than meaningful or effective. NEXT
  • 178. AppendixA CLOSER LOOK AT SOCIAL ROI.And what they measure are more lightweight than meaningful or effective. http://gim.ie/ywY4 http://gim.ie/ywY4 NEXT
  • 179. AppendixA CLOSER LOOK AT SOCIAL ROI.And when it comes to fans, most times less is more. http://gim.ie/yEmN http://gim.ie/yDYI NEXT
  • 180. AppendixA CLOSER LOOK AT SOCIAL ROI.And social metrics aren’t necessarily converting to sales. http://bit.ly/Hr8Iww NEXT
  • 181. AppendixA CLOSER LOOK AT SOCIAL ROI.But we can prove other digital channels are, like search. http://bit.ly/HvN2PN BACK
  • 182. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. While it’s true social is not free, most of the investment brands need to make are internal staffing or content creation costs–not Facebook. And yet Facebook’s solution to social at scale is for brands to pump more money and time into Facebook. Seems a tad self-serving.Appendix http://read.bi/Hpw2gu http://bit.ly/HYuJmm http://zd.net/I7tH6t http://gim.ie/AARr BACK http://bit.ly/Hpvmrj
  • 183. Appendix FACEBOOK LOST ITS MIND ON THE WAY TO IPO. A 1951 television is not a premium ad unit for brands. “Facebook can succeed wildly in online advertising if it can convince Madison Avenue to look beyond its ads’ lack of creative sizzle. Facebook ads work best, the company’s research indicates, if they’re used in conjunction with more creative brand efforts on fan pages and branded apps. But that’s a tough sell to an industry whose creative infrastructure is still set up around the ad. “Facebook needs to come up with something more beautiful,” says Cory Treffiletti, cofounder of digital marketing firmAppendix Amplify Social. Even Facebook concedes as much. Closing Facebook’s Ad Week presentation with Fischer, Mark D’Arcy, a former Time Warner ad exec who’s now Facebook’s director of global creative solutions, said of Facebook ads, “We’re sort of like 1951 television.” To put it another way, Facebook still needs to marry its social ad science with the ad industry’s creative dark arts.” http://on.fb.me/HxcYZ9 http://onforb.es/GQE3Kr BACK
  • 184. CLOSING: A FEW SUGGESTIONS & SOLUTIONS
  • 185. Appendix A NOTE ABOUT THE FINAL SECTION. NEW SLIDE Given the short duration of my SXSW slot, I could only focus on the problem, not the solution. This section has been fleshed out with a little more detail on how to solve for the problems posed. I’ve included frameworks, filters, check- lists, etc. to help you achieve your social reset. However, it’s impossible to get too prescriptive as every brand has it nuances. If you’re interested in a more detailed perspective, please reach out to me on LinkedIn.Appendix NEXT
  • 186. Appendix SOME WAYS TO ACCEPT REALITY. Whether you make it public or not, be honest about who you are as a brand, what your strengths and limitations are, the realities of the political landscape that surrounds you. For just a moment, answer honestly–are you a boring or cool brand? Are you a brand people want to be associated with or do you serve a more invisible presence in their life. Neither is bad. If you are a cool brand, then chances are you are excelling in social not only on Facebook, but within many other social platforms as well. If you’re a boring brand or a more ubiquitous brand, then embrace it. Or pay up, effect culture, and earn your cool stripes. Be honest about your: Brand/Product: Goals, strengths, limitations, ubiquity, quality, inclusion within culture, ability to act at the speed of culture, etc. Tone, actions, natural creators of content, ease of conversation, level of true honesty allowed in the dialogue, degree of meaningful insider knowledge Behavior: you could provide to your community, the natural frequency of offers/deals, degree to which your brand is associated with events or csr, etc. Objectives: Customer service, develop and reward fan, generate revenue, expand brand footprint, identify new customer segments, etc. Are you listening to fans, are they on Facebook, are they elsewhere, what is their existing level of fan passion (e.g. would there be a fan club with or Audience: without Facebook), do they really have time to have a relationship with you and is your brand an important part of their lives, do they want to have a relationship with you, can this conversation add value to consumers & the brand, etc. Be honest about the power and final say of legal (or find a way to educate and/or go around them); Will moderation be forced, will you post user-generated Legal’s Risk Tolerance: content without legal review, are you allowed to take risks and beg forgiveness later, etc. Are you adequately staffed to meet your social objectives, are you prepared for a potential negative PR nightmare, do you have the organizational processes in place to Staffing & Budget Realities: ensure social nimbleness, after production do you have adequate budget to maintain your campaign, etc. How much time and budget was spent, what tangibly was returned, what worked, what didn’t, what systemic changes could be made to enable Previous Social Efforts Lessons & ROI: future success, etc.Appendix What Success Looks Like: Likes (shouldn’t be an answer), earned media, industry accolades, brand awareness, pass-along/shareability, customer service, etc. Politics & Hidden Agendas: Personal career growth, fame, perceived innovation, perceived industry relevancy, etc. The degree to which your culture lives within the bindings of your employee handbook or thrives and growths with every employee Corporate Culture & Structure: action, is it hierarchal or nimble, is it old/mature or emerging/experimental, does it reward the status quo, the degree of flexibility and scalability, the degree to which you can take risks without fear of losing your job, etc. NEXT
  • 187. Appendix SOME WAYS TO FORCE CLARITY. Force uncomfortable clarity. Try to ditch the jargon and start focusing on only actions and behaviors that are clear and measurable. Force this clarity to bleed into and remain within your organization and your partners. Here are some thoughts on how to get started: Define what the concept of social means for your brand (and don’t use the jargon-y answers that are meaningless)–don’t Google the answer either Define your company’s real marketing goals, strengths & limitations (If you’re afraid to put them on paper, then I’m guessing your organization has larger issues than social) Define all other ambiguous social terminology, KPIs, brand behaviors, etc. Assign concrete and valuable success metrics Have the tough discussions with legal and management to truly determine what is possible and what is not and then become accepting of that reality for the short-term Be honest about the realities of your social staffing and content budget. Make sure you have the resources to administer your social media marketing efforts.  This means more than just someone checking your FB or Twitter account once or twice a day.  It means that they have a desktop notification system that let’s them know when new posts are made so you can respond in Internet time. If you realize you don’t have enough resources and you don’t have the budget to cover incremental hires, figure out what you’ll need to cut (e.g. Facebook page, Twitter, etc.) Unfortunately, something has to give. You wouldn’t buy media space if you didn’t have a TVAppendix commercial to fill it, the same thing is true of staffing in social media Define what content you can feasible produce both from a topical and a format standpoint and make sure that it is cool/meaningful/ interesting enough to tell friends about and then have a plan on how to syndicate it (beyond Facebook) NEXT
  • 188. Appendix KEELEY’S TRIANGLE (SOMETIMES KNOWN AS VALUE TRIANGLE). For those that aren’t familiar, Larry Keeley, an OG innovation strategist, devised the triangle below as a way of expressing how successful businesses are balanced in the concerns about the desirability, technical feasibility and financial viability of their products. Throughout my career, I’ve used the augmented version found in my presentation as a way of filtering and framing the possibilities in creating successful digital experiences to clients.Appendix In innovation design (or goal-directed design), you begin by asking, "What do people desire?" Then, you ask, "Of the things Caveat: A colleague of mine recently said the International OCD Foundation: people desire, what will sustain a business?" And finally, you ask, The Shortest Ad Ever defied the triangle because it successfully delivered on all three principles. I would counter that to get exposure and press on a video such "Of the things people desire that will also sustain a business, a this, it took labor (making it not free.) what can we build?" A common trap is to focus primarily on technology while losing sight of viability and desirability. http://bit.ly/H7HcGO NEXT
  • 189. Appendix WHAT DOES THE TRIANGLE HAVE TO DO WITH SOCIAL? When applied to social, the general principle is that you have to choose between the three factors when creating a valuable experience for customers within social media. You cannot have them all. (Although recent Facebook updates almost make the concept of “Free” irrelevant.) The framework speaks to the inherent tension in design where we must balance business and engineering concerns/needs with user concerns/needs. Factors/Principles Tradeoff Example But it will not be good OR it will have a short shelf life and A majority of brands’ interaction Free & Fast be hard to replicate within social media / Ikea Catalog Picture Sweepstakes (e.g. polls, sweepstakes, contests, pushed content, posts, etc,) But it’s going to cost you Old Spice’s Response Videos Stunt / Fast & Engaging (e.g. systemic team, quality creative Visa’s Real-Time Olympic Celebration Ads writer/ blogger, risk tolerance, etc.) But it won’t be fastAppendix (e.g. will be programmatic, will take time Arcade Fire’s The Wilderness Engaging & Free of a dedicated team to make it come to Downtown / Jay-Z Decoded Powered by Bing life, will take countless staff hours if you have an in-house dev team, etc.) http://bit.ly/H7HcGO BACK
  • 190. Appendix WHAT DOES ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES MEAN? You signed up for this. Start with objectives and KPIs, but spend the bulk of the time on development, execution, activation, & optimization of the experience. Stop reading, tweeting, and conference speaking. Erase your brain and what you thought you knew. Define your brands’ social footprint (and by social I mean the entire landscape, not simply Facebook). Understand your audience, their preferences, passions, and needs. Make a tip jar for every time your team uses cliche jargon or shows you ideas that use technology for technology’s sake. Demand to see audience data and insight that was the impetus or inspiration point for every creative idea you’re shown. Start thinking proactively, long-term, and systemically. Stop reacting, thinking short- term, and producing one-offs that do not lead to a larger vision. And hire staff if you need it.Appendix NEXT
  • 191. Appendix SOME AREAS TO FOCUS ON. The checklist below is meant to be to help you dive into making a well-oiled social strategy and presence. Here are some thoughts on how to get started: Have your media or social partner put together a social media landscape/ ecosystem custom tailored to your audience and brand data and have them show each platform’s strengths and weaknesses. You may even have them map the social platforms to a customer decision journey or a audience “day in the life.” (See next slide for some examples) Assign the responsibility to someone on your team to listen to your brand’s entire social media presence and, more importantly, respond when someone posts a complaint or asks a question (especially on Facebook and Twitter).  Even if you can’t answer the question right away you need to at least acknowledge that someone has a problem and wants to be heard Deal with the data. Source tools to organize it. Hire analysts to glean insights. Create KPI’s that can be measurably linked back to a brand-performance metric of success. Ultimately, understand every social efforts’ role in driving sales. Implement systemic, cross-channel data systems that allow for easily gleaned insights, optimizations, and ROI calculations Social media marketing is more important for some products than others. Forget all the bullshit about why someone likes your brand. Consumers just don’t have time to spend in a social relationship with a lot of brands.  Marketers need to know which marketing channel provides the best chance to keep and grow their customer base Take the questions/issues commonly received through social media and turn them into content FAQ’s on your website. Be sure not to just refer someone to the FAQ section when they have a question, though.  It’s about helping consumers get the information they need in a fast and responsive way, but the canned content can help address a majority of the issues before they are raised Stop ignoring that pesky ROI question. No longer can you claim social media performance and impact on your brand is either too vague or hard to measure–or on the other side of the spectrum–is equivalent to a like. We’ve experimented in social media and no longer can we let ourselves and Facebook off the hook. Once you decideAppendix ROI doesn’t matter, it opens the door to all kinds of magical thinking. However, this doesn’t mean you should ignore social media if you can’t generate ROI immediately. Even if you’re never able to establish a hard ROI ratio, the very act of pursuing ROI brings rigor to your marketing as you continually test, refine and retest your efforts based on solid benchmarks and clearly defined business goals If you were able to make some inroads with legal, then start allowing the people who are the voice of your brand on social media to solve customer problems. Don’t make them jump through hoops or get approvals to put out fires. Reward people who turn inquiries or angry customers into satisfied customers NEXT
  • 192. Appendix DETERMINE YOUR BRAND FOOTPRINT IN SOCIAL To a large degree the question is not, “Should your brand be on Facebook?” It’s more like, “What is my brand’s social footprint (or ecosystem or whatever you choose to call it) across the spectrum of possibilities and beyond the usual suspects of Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter (e.g. Pinterest, Google+, LinkedIn, Instagram, StumbleUpon, Svpply, Digg, etc.)?” It should showcase where and how your brand lives and manifests within social and why. It should discuss the platforms you choose not to participate in (at least for the moment). It should attempt to highlight your audience’s interaction and behavior within each platform. I highly encourage you to take the time to put it on paper in a way you can share within your company and with your partners to get everyone on the same page and to act as filters for ideas, communications, etc. Although, it can be tedious, it’s best to start by just getting your brain sketched out on paper like a wireframe. There are a million ways to visualize. I’ve included some “brand footprint” frameworks below. I definitely like some better than others, but use what works best for your brand and corporate culture http://gim.ie/Auiy http://gim.ie/Aodp http://gim.ie/An9z http://gim.ie/Ae3l http://gim.ie/AeHp http://gim.ie/AeFo http://gim.ie/AeG4Appendix http://gim.ie/AdUi http://gim.ie/AePK http://gim.ie/AdU5 NEXT http://gim.ie/Ae1D
  • 193. Appendix DETERMINE YOUR BRAND FOOTPRINT IN SOCIAL Recently McKinsey launched an interesting analysis on Demystifying Social Media. Definitely worth a read as it relates to understanding your brand’s footprint across channels and the customer journey.Appendix http://bit.ly/JnEnQ0 NEXT
  • 194. Appendix THE RISE OF THE NICHE SOCIAL NETWORKS. I believe starting in 2012 successful social media programs won’t be on Facebook, at least not exclusively. Winning brands will exploit Facebook as just one point of engagement while using other social platforms to create richer and deeper relationships. Although, Facebook is unavoidable for most of us, that doesn’t mean social media marketing starts and stops there. Blogs, aggregators, and forums don’t earn as much sizzle as Facebook, but they remain effective channels for mass influence and impact . Moreover, within specific audiences there are niche social sites that deliver results, such as deviantART and fecalface for designers and artists, refinery29 for fashionistas, or Goodreads for bookworms. SIZE MATTERS.THE SMALLER THE BETTER? We’ve all heard of the Dunbar number (e.g. our brain can only handle 150 friends before becoming overloaded). Yet, a tension still exists between the idea that sheer community size trumps a smaller, more intimate community. However, data is confirming that it’s not about the size, but more about relevancy. It makes sense that the more relevant my social connection, the more I’ll engage. So while everyone tries to beef up their likes and Facebook continues to beat its chest at it’s massiveness, it may be better to be lean and mean. Myspace is a great example of a community that nearly disappeared in a day. Start spreading your wings in relevant ways to prevent potential obsolution.Appendix http://bit.ly/HX43Vt NEXT
  • 195. Appendix A NOTE ON NICHE COMMUNITIES. TBD Facebook makes sharing easy—too easy, some would say. Because one’s social network often consists not only of actual friends but also relatives and sort-of friends, along with sort-of friends of their sort-of friends, you need to be careful about what you post. Yes, the site does allow you to define smaller circles of friends, but that requires constantly monitoring what should, and should not, be shared with whom. All of this has created an opportunity for start-ups to offer sharing that is intimate by design. These newer social networks offer a range of focus and constraints. Dave Morin, who worked at Facebook for four years before leaving to help found Path in 2010, explains the rationale for his company this way: “Facebook has made socializing on the Internet normal. But now there is an opportunity to return to intimate socializing...You’ll never experience the problem of accidentally sharing something with the wrong people.” Circl.es Also, here’s an interesting perspective from Brogan I thought summed up the situation well... Recently sold to Facebook for $1 billion.Appendix http://nyti.ms/HMGYmk NEXT
  • 196. Appendix A NOTE ON PINTEREST. TBD Clearly the current darling niche community quickly transforming into a mass community is Pinterest. With referral traffic beginning to rival Facebook and data to prove it helps brands generate revenue, it’s time to test her out if you haven’t already.Appendix http://bit.ly/Is2Zrq NEXT
  • 197. Appendix THE 5 BIG LIES OF SOCIA MEDIA ROI. ROI doesn’t have to be all about sales (although the best brands manage to do so). If you want to understand the full benefit of your social media efforts, you also need to look at cost savings throughout the organization. If you lower your cost per lead, improve the efficiency of your customer service, or attract qualified new hires using social tools, you’re generating ROI, but it’s not as cool as a sexy branded app. However, a single social media interaction with a client might create a sale or save you money, but many more will not. It doesn’t make sense to measure all such interactions as equal indicators of success. ROI can only be measured in currency earned. Also, you can’t just assign a dollar value to each fan and then add them all together. The process of calculating the costs and benefits of social media vary depending on your tactics and goals. The following is sourced from a great social ROI white paper “The SmartBrief Guide to Social Media Return on Investment.” The paper gives a fantastic, detailed third-party overview on social ROI. I highly recommend.Appendix http://bit.ly/Kwhqht NEXT
  • 198. Appendix A NOTE ON ROI: If you’re look for more hands on help, here’s another great white paper from Radian6:Appendix http://bit.ly/HVWNqE BACK
  • 199. Appendix PUTTING FACEBOOK BACK IN THEIR PLACE. Stop ignoring that nagging feeling you’re forcing a relationship with Facebook. Take control and take off the blue- tinted glasses. With Facebooks impending IPO maybe they’ll start to care about the audience again–and I don’t mean brands. Stop treating them like social experts. Granting them this power over your brand is like being on a ship with a captain who dresses the part but who’s never sailed. Until they start acting like a partner, regain control and treat them like any other media vendor. Make them do the right thing. Tell them what you need. Customize their jargon to make it your own. Start demanding more. You’re paying for a service; they should be there to serve you.Appendix NEXT
  • 200. Appendix PUTTING FACEBOOK BACK IN THEIR PLACE. For a platform that has made billions of dollars from its vast amount of users, Facebook certainly isn’t putting their users’ needs first. Google made that mistake once, lost revenue, and went back to what worked. Here’s hoping Facebook does this same. User-Focused Revenue-Focused "We ask ourselves, What would the world be like with genuine personal relationships with our government, with celebrities, with the brand that help me express who I am?… To make full use of Facebook, brands must behave more like people" –Facebooks chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg said during her keynote at the sites first-ever fMC conference in late February 2012.Appendix NEXT
  • 201. Appendix A CHECKLIST TO HELP YOU PUT FACEBOOK BACK IN THEIR PLACE. We must stop romanticizing a platform most of us do not even use. We cannot be afraid to provide constructive, knowledgeable criticism to Facebook. They are not your brands social experts. Make Facebook face the numbers and don’t let them blame you for the result. Demand more data, customization, targeting, and support from Facebook if you’re spending a significant amount with them Don’t trust their data and make sure you’re tracking more than what Facebook provides by partnering with third-party services like PageLever Demand a date for when the ‘brand blackout’ on mobile issue will be solved Stop inviting them to internal meetings and brainstorms and do not ask their opinion about your campaign–trust your media and creative partners Stop using Visit us at Facebook as your call-to-action Take their generic jargon and customize for you and your clients. As a concept, social by design isn’t a bad idea. What makes it misleading is that it was coined by a company that says “social by design” but means “social by Facebook”. Spend time defining what social by design means for your brand If you spend a lot, you should get insider access. Find out the plan for Instagram. Tell them that instead of more bullshit, self- serving items like Timeline, you’d prefer targeting enhancements or enhanced mobile marketing abilitiesAppendix Expand off of Facebook and experiment with niche and emerging communities as long as your audience is there Say no to F-Commerce for now (and until Facebook starts to give a shit about this functionality and doesn’t outsource dev to third parties) NEXT
  • 202. Appendix SAY NO TO F-COMMERCE. Forrester recently published a report “Will Facebook Ever Drive eCommerce?” Their answer was an unequivocal no with analysis to support their skepticism about the viability of f-commerce. According to Forrester, unless you’re a small online retailer, or using f-commerce in the context of a loyalty program (CRM), in publishing or gaming industries, or running online flash sales or marketplaces, then forget f-commerce. “Forget f-commerce it’s foolish...In spite of the fact that hundreds of millions of people around the world have Facebook accounts, the ability of the social network to drive revenue for eCommerce businesses continues to remain elusive. eBusiness professionals in retail collectively report little direct or indirect benefit from Facebook, and social networks overall trail far behind other customer acquisition and retention tactics like paid search and email in generating a return on investment. For some companies and brands, Facebook promises to support branding and awareness (i.e., “top of the (marketing) funnel”) efforts, but for most eBusiness companies in retail, Facebook is unlikely to correlate directly to near-term sales. A few pockets of success, however, have surfaced, and a cottage industry of vendors who can support these programs will inevitably burgeon.”Appendix – Forrester’s research analyst Sucharita Mulpuru http://gim.ie/ BACK
  • 203. Appendix WHY A SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERT? There are a bunch of faux social experts taking advantage of people’s ignorance and fears. They have no qualifications or hands-on knowledge to be providing advice. Moving forward, make sure you find experts who have built, executed, and optimized. Get rid of the theorists, the gurus, the bloggers, those who jump from job to job because social executed correctly can be meticulously painful. The best, trusted partners tend to be a mixture of anthropologists, creatives, in the weeds of detail & data, but also in the sky dreaming, agile thinkers, and designers. If you are in marketing, be open and accept this external help. More likely than not, you have no true expert internally (although I’m sure in the future you plan to hire one when budget permits). If you’re in advertising, you’re probably surrounded by a bunch of phonies. You need to find the real deals and be comfortable outsourcing until you’re on your way. The good ones... • Are audience-led, not trend-led • Are mobile-focused • Do not blog about social media • Have a healthy appreciation for email marketing • Would rather generate revenue than win awards The bad ones... • Haven’t worked more than two years for the same company • Like QR codes • Rip off existing campaigns • Make you feel socially stupid • Recommend augmented reality for everything • Believe the new changes to Facebook are amazingAppendix ibm.com/cmo NEXT
  • 204. Appendix SIGNALS YOU NEED AN EXPERT. You know you need a real experts’ help when you realize you don’t have a solution in place for backing-up your social data? Without a tool like Social Safe all of the engagement your brand and fans have on Facebook could disappear never to return in an instant. Facebook makes it clear in it’s Privacy Policy that they own everything. Backing it up with a third-party tool serves as the most truest Timeline a brand can have.Appendix http://socialsafe.net/enterprise http://bit.ly/I2vgsG NEXT
  • 205. Appendix WHAT TO ASK IN THE INTERVIEW Here are some great questions to ascertain your potential social guru’s level of social media certification. Ask them to... Define social, engagement, community manager, etc. (if they use all Facebook jargon in their response be wary) Explain how they’ve measured success both strategically and executionally for a past brand and have them discuss any hurdles and successes they encountered along the way (if they claim they had an analytics team that managed “all of that,” be wary...it’s fine to have an analytics team but the strategist needs to be the conductor and should understand the in’s and out’s of the analytics that were implemented) Predict the next social craze (and if they answer “Pinterest” you should be wary as they are already too late to the party) Tell you if they blog and conduct speaking engagements excessively (be wary if they do; he/she should be focused on your brand not building a brand for his/herself) Put together a gut-based social media landscape/ ecosystem custom tailored to your audience and brand data and have them show each platform’s strengths and weaknesses. You may even have them map the social platforms to a customer decision journey or a audience “day in the life.” (See next slide for some examples.) A good strategist is a master of culture and people. They should know enough core information to put together a pretty relevant first stab without much data from youAppendix NEXT
  • 206. Appendix SIGNALS YOU NEED AN EXPERT. If you haven’t heard of these tools before, you need a social expert. Good ones stay on top of everything from analytics to content syndication to seo to strategy to the newest APIs, audience habits, and niche communities. They are invaluable in their expertise and ability to keep up with the social rat race.Appendix BACK
  • 207. Appendix WHO IS THE SOCIAL CLAIRVOYANT? The Social Clairvoyant is a solution genie providing personalized Facebook recommendations and watch-outs for brands. After a user answers nine questions, the tool delivers a social fortune telling that provides insights on how brands could have success on Facebook in the future.  In some respects, the Social Clairvoyants science is more accurate and credible than the lion share of social media guru’s out there. The logic behind the tool is baked in unbiased, hard audience data, unavoidable truths in marketing staffing and legal power, and anecdotal experience learned along the way. She’s in beta so please feel free to try to break it, beat on it, send us feedback, suggestions, etc. We are definitely a work-in-progress and in the throes of optimization. This phase of the application was meant to be a sarcastic swipe at the industry. In the future, we plan to add more functionality with the hopes of creating a fully- functioning, accurate tool to help brands–a real-life embodiment of a social bullshit meter. Best case scenario, we also hope it makes Facebook a little moreAppendix accountable along the way. Check her out here: http://metavintage.com/fortune http://metavintage.com/fortune BACK
  • 208. Appendix FRIENDS AND MONEY DON’T MIX. Part of accepting reality is comprehending that friends and money do not mix. As long as brands want consumers’ money, and Facebook wants brands’ money, the aspirations of community will never be reached and we’re setting ourselves up to fail. This isn’t camp and we’re not singing Kumbaya. This is business and we’re all about profit. “I do not foresee Facebook losing users, but if people revolt due to increased advertiser presence, it would not be the first time a social network lost for this reason.” According to Alice Marwick, a researcher with Microsoft Research, "MySpace felt a lot of pressure to monetize quickly after it was sold to News Corp. And I think as result, they added advertising, they added things we might consider to be spammy, things users found intrusive."  “If users find Facebook spammy, I am sure Google would be more than happy to welcome new and returning users to its sagging Google+ social network.”Appendix http://bit.ly/HO7EnM NEXT
  • 209. Appendix A RARE GLIMPSE AT REALITY. Although focused on the financial industry, I found this recent study to be the most honest assessment of Facebook– clearly demonstrating money and friends don’t mix. Not only does it mirror my experiences, but it also matches the general data I’ve found as well. Imagine if we conducted more industry-specific, non-Facebook funded studies?Appendix http://bit.ly/Ify66Z BACK
  • 210. Appendix WHY AM YOU ON FACEBOOK? It should never matter what works well on Facebook, it’s about what works well for your brand. Even the best social marketers need to take a pause and come up with a jargon-free answer to the question–why do you have a Facebook page? Why do you want followers? Are you ready for the responsibility? Are there smaller communities better suited for your brand? I’ve succeeded if you are able to take even one slide from this presentation and make your client, your boss, or a coworker ask themselves this question. Why again am I on Facebook? Only then will I have succeeded.Appendix BACK