January 2013         Troyer Patent Portfolio Report                                                              Inventor:...
apparatus includes a camera/ sensor as part of the projector. The laser apparatus is like an overheadprojector. Film, slid...
INDEX      Laser Projector Apparatus  1. List of Troyer Patents                                                    Page 2 ...
Legal Representative and Intellectual PropertyJohn Shors: John.Shors@lawiowa.com    •   http://www.davisbrownlaw.com/attor...
Explanation Full Color Spectrum Claim: Troyer proved that the previous laser projection art was wrong.It stated that the r...
Evans & Sutherland: Sony and Kodak experts and many others attended the Metatron Laser Projectordemonstrations at Lexel La...
No Laser Projector On Market: For the last 10 years since the first Troyer patented prototype wasdemonstrated, no group ha...
attended an earlier Metatron showing and felt that the laser video images were as good as film. Alsothe Metatron would eli...
1. Troyer Patent US 6183092 February 6, 2001     http://www.everypatent.com/comp/pat6183092.htmlInventor:          TroyerD...
a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image; andfurther laser apparatus for proje...
3. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laser light of wavelen...
means for writing an image incrementally onto successive portions of the control stage; andmeans for directing the beam on...
13. The projector of claim 12, wherein:the deflecting element comprises a mirror mounted on a galvanometer or motor.14. Th...
21. The projector of claim 20, wherein:the gain in efficiency approaches approximately fifty-six percent, in comparison wi...
said laser apparatus producing an initially substantially circular laser-light beam subject to nonuniformillumination;mean...
34. A laser projection system for forming an image on an irregular projection medium which comprises acurved screen or dom...
Claims1. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of w...
scanned from an image or generated in a computer, or amplitude-modulated laser-diode illuminationswept two-dimensionally a...
22. The projector of claim 10, wherein: said light valve also receives the blue and green laser light formodulation, withi...
plurality of scrims in optical series, one or more trees, grass, vines or other foliage, a hillside or otherlandscape, or ...
1. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes exclusivelylaser light of wav...
the combination of a red laser beam having a laser light of wavelength of about 635 nanometers orlonger, and laser beam of...
Troyer US Patent February 14, 2012 8113660   Projector and Camera with Dimensional Sharp Full Spectrum Color Dimensional I...
7.   The laser apparatus for claim 6, wherein:     the laser projector is adapted to project substantially     cyan colore...
means for directing the beam onto successive selected portions of the    modulation stage, and means for generally synchro...
a reflective light valve having a camera control stage that is addressed by low    power amplified-modulated lasers;    me...
AbstractsEnglish AbstractA laser projection system wherein speckle is suppressed through beam-pathdisplacement, by deflect...
dune oscillation rotative, qui assure la déviation. Les images sont écrites de manièreincrémentielle sur des parties succe...
Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT): Yes     (86) PCT Filing Number:           PCT/US1999/009501 (87) International Publicatio...
CLAIMS:1. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of w...
10. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 5, further comprising:further laser apparatus for projecting one or more beams...
17. The projector of claim 14, wherein the reflective light valve iscontrolled by light or control signals applied to the ...
each laser in the first-mentioned laser apparatus and the further laserapparatus is exclusively a gas laser.25. The projec...
distinctly different distances, of such irregular projection medium as a showfor an audience.29. The system of claim 28, w...
34. A laser projection system for forming an image on an irregularprojection medium having portions at distinctly differin...
and means for directing the beam onto a face of the light valve to modulatethe beam with the image,wherein the laser proje...
43. The projector of claim 42, wherein:the displacing means scans the beam over the beam-modulation stageby mechanically o...
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013
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Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013

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Troyer Patent Portfolio update: Canadian patent granted January 15, 2013 that contains combination claims of Troyer’s US patents 2001, 2005, 2006 and 2012. The Canadian patent office is very thorough, especially with the upgraded global search engines. This is an important validation for Troyer, declaring that there is no prior art for her innovation.
Basic patent: laser projector apparatus with expanded laser beam directed to a reflective light valve with the 635 nm red or over. Cyan can be added to the blue green. Great blacks and whites are created and colors in the full spectrum (like nature). The spatially modulated laser beams keeps their inherent quality of polarization, collimation and coherence to the screen. The images have IF IT IS—infinite focus, instant transformation and innate sharpness automatically adjusting to any irregular surfaces such as domes and curved screens. The laser apparatus is the linchpin for the HIVE: holographic immersive virtual environments (holodeck playpen space); edutainment (content); edutainer (performance).
Each spatially modulated pixel has an infinite depth of focus attribute that provides sharp 3D depth and sharp focused dimensional images (domes, simulation, irregular surfaces, water screens, etc.). The laser apparatus includes a camera/ sensor as part of the projector. The laser apparatus is like an overhead projector. Film, slides, microscopic organisms, live action etc. can be captured by the camera and amplified without pixels to a curved screen or dome image. Live action gestures can be sensor evaluated (Kinect camera) and integrated. Small dimensional high resolution pictures from an OLED or other device can be captured. A hologram or 3D laser modulated image is captured and amplified.
The laser apparatus can be an advanced telecine copying film; also video and still images (slides). The telecine images are captured on a small curved screen, the video feed transformed to full color Z depth dimensional moving pictures. The capture is real time and is agnostic to the frame rate. The laser apparatus is a digital intermediary tool that provides instant transformation to images (full color, curved space, Z depth factor, 2D to 3D).

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Troyer patent portfolio 2013 with new Canadian patent claims Jan. 15, 2013

  1. 1. January 2013 Troyer Patent Portfolio Report Inventor: Diane Troyer No licensing or assignments or promises No ownership claims or lawsuits (clean) Process: Making deals and negotiating Information on Request: 818-795-2407Troyer Patent Portfolio update: Canadian patent granted January 15, 2013 that containscombination claims of Troyer’s US patents 2001, 2005, 2006 and 2012. The Canadian patent office isvery thorough, especially with the upgraded global search engines. This is an important validation forTroyer, declaring that there is no prior art for her innovation.Basic patent: laser projector apparatus with expanded laser beam directed to a reflective light valve withthe 635 nm red or over. Cyan can be added to the blue green. Great blacks and whites are created andcolors in the full spectrum (like nature). The spatially modulated laser beams keeps their inherentquality of polarization, collimation and coherence to the screen. The images have IF IT IS—infinite focus,instant transformation and innate sharpness automatically adjusting to any irregular surfaces such asdomes and curved screens. The laser apparatus is the linchpin for the HIVE: holographic immersivevirtual environments (holodeck playpen space); edutainment (content); edutainer (performance).Each spatially modulated pixel has an infinite depth of focus attribute that provides sharp 3D depth andsharp focused dimensional images (domes, simulation, irregular surfaces, water screens, etc.). The laser
  2. 2. apparatus includes a camera/ sensor as part of the projector. The laser apparatus is like an overheadprojector. Film, slides, microscopic organisms, live action etc. can be captured by the camera andamplified without pixels to a curved screen or dome image. Live action gestures can be sensor evaluated(Kinect camera) and integrated. Small dimensional high resolution pictures from an OLED or otherdevice can be captured. A hologram or 3D laser modulated image is captured and amplified.The laser apparatus can be an advanced telecine copying film; also video and still images (slides). Thetelecine images are captured on a small curved screen, the video feed transformed to full color Z depthdimensional moving pictures. The capture is real time and is agnostic to the frame rate. The laserapparatus is a digital intermediary tool that provides instant transformation to images (full color, curvedspace, Z depth factor, 2D to 3D).Troyer Patent PortfolioCanadian Patent: 2,372,833 January 15, 2013 Diane TroyerUnited States Patent: 8113660 February 14, 2012, Diane TroyerLaser Projection Apparatus with camera and dimensional full spectrum colored sharp imagesUnited States Patent: US 7,055,957 B2 Jun. 6, 2006; Diane TroyerUnited States Patent: US 6,910,774 B2 June 28, 2005; Diane TroyerLaser Projection Apparatus with Liquid-Crystal Light Valves and Scanning Reading BeamMexican Patent: PCT/US99/09501 November 18, 2004; Diane Troyer Mexican patent number: 224274Indian Patent: IN/PCT/2000/00676/MUM; August 25, 2004, Diane TroyerUnited States Patent: US 6,183,092 B1; February 5, 2001; Diane TroyerLaser Projection Apparatus with Liquid-Crystal Light Valves & Scanning Reading Beam*United States Patent: US 5,317,348 May 31, 1994; Dr. Randall J. Knize (owned by Diane Troyer)Full color solid state laser projection system(Troyer’s concept; Knize, solid-state laser expert, wrote patent)  Additional patent pending; submitted March 2006 Telecine and digital intermediate • Provisional: new patent pending--- 2010 (important breakthrough that adds value). 2 Page
  3. 3. INDEX Laser Projector Apparatus 1. List of Troyer Patents Page 2 2. Attorneys Page 4 3. Troyer notes on patent claims Page 4 4. Troyer Patent US 6183092 February 6, 2001 Page 9 5. Troyer Patent US 6910774 June 28, 2005 Page 16 6. Troyer Patent US 7055957 June 6, 2006 Page 20 7. Troyer Patent US 8113660 February 14, 2012 Page 23 (Camera and Projector with sharp full spectrum color dimensional images) 8. Troyer Canadian Patent 2,372,833 February 28, 2011 Page 26 9. First Patent: Dr. Knize wrote patent (Troyer’s white paper) Assigned to Troyer (Dec. 1992). Many patents refer to this patent, including the Troyer 2001 patent (plus). Information about studio theme park support. Page 42 10. Patents Citations referred to main Troyer patent; Patent copy (the international copy is on line that was accepted in India and Mexico). Page 55  Available on request: Patent Pending: Telecine and Digital Intermediary process; Provisional: Box optic 2D to 3D real time imaging 3 Page
  4. 4. Legal Representative and Intellectual PropertyJohn Shors: John.Shors@lawiowa.com • http://www.davisbrownlaw.com/attorneys/view/index.cfm/john_shors • 515-246-7983 (John’s office) 515-288-2500 (Main Office) johnshors@davisbrownlaw.com • The Davis Brown Tower, 215 10th Street, Suite 1300, Des Moines, IA 50309PATENTS – CANADA: Smart & Biggar http://www.smart-biggar.ca/About/ • Smart & Biggar/Fetherstonhaugh Canada’s leading intellectual property firm • Oliver Stone: 613-232-2486 • http://www.smart- biggar.ca/SB/index.cfm?RedirectPage=/professionals/professionals.cfm?ThisID=108INDIAN PATENT OFFICE • Chandrakantjoshi (chandrakantmjoshi@vsnl.net) • Chandrakant M. Joshi 5yh & 6th Floor; Vishwa Nanak, Chakala Road • Andherei (East) Mumbai- 400 099, IndiaMEXICAN PATENT OFFICE • Javier Uhthoff-Orive j.uhthoff@uhthoff.com.mxTroyer Laser Projector Patent Portfolio Notes:Purpose: The Troyer patent portfolio with notes is provided for the professional or layperson to do anorganized survey of the Troyer patents and the claims. This will help the reader understand how themost streamlined process works to create the best laser projector images with full spectrum color, goodblacks (contrast) and images with sharp depth of focus. If a comparison of patent claims from other laserprojectors is demanded, this will be under other copy. Examples: Microvision (Pico MEMS), Light BlueOptics (LCoS), and Kodak (grated light valve - GLV).Troyer Main Claims: Full spectrum color with lasers addressed to a reflective light valve. The spatially 4modulated image retains the laser inherent quality of coherence, collimation and polarization allowing Pageinfinite sharp focused images on irregular surfaces (dome, Cinerama, simulation, HIVE, Immersion, etc.)
  5. 5. Explanation Full Color Spectrum Claim: Troyer proved that the previous laser projection art was wrong.It stated that the red had to be orange red (610 nm. orange) for brightness and to combine colors tomatch NTSC TV color standard. Troyer’s invention uses deeper red for full spectrum film like colors.Explanation of Infinite Sharp Focus: Troyer’s claims state that the laser beam attributes are retainedwhen they are addressed to a reflective light valve (if the optic path is set up correctly). Troyerdiscovered this advanced improvement after working for months attempting to upgrade the TRWprojector that used the standard Acoustic Optic Modulation (AOM) which is a radio frequency methodthat places the image into the laser beam. The AOM reduces brightness and is not user friendly, manyoptics needed in the optic train. Troyer also wanted to have a more eye safe method of deliveringinfinite focused sharp images. The TRW method with AOM shot the modulated laser beams directly outof the lens, so was dangerous for the eyes. Troyer’s patented approach is more eye safe. The laserbeam is expanded, eliminating the sharp beam. Troyer’s main criterion was to maintain the laser’sattribute for infinite depth of focus. She proved this possible, even though engineers and physicistsinformed her it was not possible to retain the laser’s infinite focus attributes by addressing an expandedlaser beam to a reflective light valve.How Troyer Invented Process: Troyer became representative for TRW laser projector to the Studiotheme park executives and designers in 1990. Main support was Al Mirabella (Disney Imagineering). Shepurchased the 8 TRW laser projectors in Jan. 1992 after they were mothballed before Desert Storm (nobattery backup power 6 floors under in case of attack). The TRW laser projectors were developed forthe Air Force War rooms and ran 3 years 24/7 (only large laser projectors installed globally). SAC, MACand NORAD war room walls needed “best picture” for generals to view the satellite and air craft imagesin case of attack. Troyer spent from 1992 – 1996 upgrading the TRW projector and discovered a newmore streamlined way to deliver best film like laser images with infinite focus and patented the process.Troyer Proof of Concept and Patent Attorney: Peter Lippmann had a physics background and had donework for Hewlett Packard (HP) for laser printers, so understood Troyer’s claims that she presented.Lippmann was a stickler for a prototype being built that proved concept. He did not want to patentvaporware so paid close attention to Troyer’s proof of concept laser projector model. Troyer knew thather expanded beam laser approach would work with all reflective light valves. Her first tests were with areflective mirror device (like a DLP). The DLP digital mirror device was still in R&D phase. The only high-end off the shelf reflective light valve that Troyer could locate for the prototype was the Hughes liquidcrystal light valve. The Troyer February 2001 patent uses liquid crystal light valve as the example. The2006, 2012 and Canadian patents broaden to any reflective light valve, including DLP, LCoS, MEMS.Grated Light Valve (GLV) Method for Laser Projectors: Troyer and team worked out of their lab at LexelLasers in Fremont (Silicon Valley). Another type of modulator (grated light valve—GLV) for laser imagingwas being developed down the road in a Stanford lab (2000) called the Silicon Light Machine (SLM). Sonypaid $30 million for the entertainment licensing rights for the Silicon Light Machine (SLM) grated lightvalve. Evans & Sutherland paid $10 million for the rights for simulation and domes (planetariums). 5Kodak was developing patents on another type of grated light valve (GLV) approach. All spent millions Pageon R & D attempting to develop product.
  6. 6. Evans & Sutherland: Sony and Kodak experts and many others attended the Metatron Laser Projectordemonstrations at Lexel Lasers, including the VP of Evans & Sutherland (E&S) business development andtheir head engineer. They very sincerely told Troyer that the Metatron was the best video image theyhad seen. They informed their CEO that E&S should work with the Troyer patented pending process andstop investing in the GLV approach. They were not heeded. Too much money had been invested.Sony and Kodak: After viewing the Metatron Laser Projector film like images with no artifacts andadjusting to curved screens, Sony and Kodak technologists attempted to get infinite focus with theirgrated light valves (GLV). An expert for a high end company evaluated the Metatron and patentedprocess and saw the prototypes in Germany (Kodak) and Japan (Sony). He states that they were unableto duplicate the streamlined approach with best images that the Troyer patented process produced.Reflective Light Valves: In 2001 IMAX, BARCO and Christies paid $10 million each ($30 M) to TexasInstrument for the license of the digital mirror device light valve (DLP) rights for digital cinema. IMAXtransferred their rights to Digital Projection and NEC. These companies went in a different modulationdirection than Sony, Kodak and Evans & Sutherland. The DLP reflective light valve licensing rights stillholds true today and is used as a base to build the laser projectors by these companies.Mothballed Grating Light Valves: After spending millions in R&D and attempting to build a laserprojector, Sony and Evans & Sutherland & Kodak ultimately mothballed their laser GLV projects finallyrealizing the architecture was faulty. The GLV did not work (limited brightness, breaks inherent laserquality, does not automatically adjust to curves). Only flat screens could be used because the GLVcorrupted the coherence and polarization of the laser beam. The GLV process thus did not producefocused sharp images on irregular surfaces such as Cinerama, dome, simulation and immersive mediumsKodak used Troyer patented process for their demonstration: Most of the Kodak laser projectionpatents are based on the grating light valve. Kodak wanted the best 3D filmic images in their laserprojector demonstration in Dec, 2011. Thus Kodak followed the Troyer patented approach. IMAX got themothballed grated light valve (GLV) patents when they purchased Kodak’s laser patents. The IMAX CEOprovides misinformation when he stated they have patents for dome laser projection.IMAX CEO states they have big screen patents from Kodak:http://video.foxbusiness.com/v/1222364361001/imax-ceo-on-laser-projection-patents-deal-with-kodak/Kodak Demonstration: Kodak demonstrated the Troyer patented method using the stereo two channelapproach: laser addressed and modulated by a RLV; full color spectrum using red over 635 nm. reducingspeckle by combining full spectrum color, optical displacement, spatial modulation, and retaining theintegrity of the laser beams throughout the optical channel. Different polarization is used with the twochannel stereo to create 3D with glasses as discussed in the Troyer 2003 white paper.IMAX Licenses Kodak Patents: IMAX licensed the Kodak patents for projectors. The KODAK patents arebased on the grated light valve device. There are some “leapfrog” patents written after the Kodak 6experts saw the Troyer Metatron laser demonstration and received Troyer’s white papers in 2000. Page
  7. 7. No Laser Projector On Market: For the last 10 years since the first Troyer patented prototype wasdemonstrated, no group has been able to develop another method to create “best” picture withstreamlined approach with real time polarized bright images with full color spectrum. No digital cinemacompany has taken advantage of the added caveat of images that adjust to domes and Cinerama. LightBlue Optics, Microvision, and AAXA are promoting the infinite focus for small images. It is believed thatwhen audiences see the Metatron attributes they will want Z*Tron Vision for their homes and gaming.LIPA Consortium: This industry consortium made up of Sony, Kodak, IMAX, Christies, BARCO, Dolby,NEC, etc. promotes full color spectrum laser images with a reflective light valve modulator (Troyer’spatents). The Troyer patented process creates the most streamlined approach that is more eye safe anddelivers better sharp 3D depth images with no ghosting. IMAX, Kodak, Christies, BARCO, Sony and REDare infringing on the Troyer patents with their prototype models. They are, however, showing stereoimages with glasses on flat screens, not taking advantage of the Z depth factor that can create autodimensional images without glasses.Rockwell Collins was purchasing simulation companies in 2005 and beyond. They paid Evans &Sutherland $71.5 million for their simulation rights to the SLM laser projector. With the purchase,Rockwell also purchased buildings and engineers in Utah. Rockwell Collins mothballed the SLM laserprojector soon after they purchased the license. Rockwell Collins is now stressing simulation, but doesnot have a projector that automatically adjusts to the curved screen and shows full color realistic highresolution dimensional images in curved space with best deep blacks (contrast). Rockwell Collins doessell a projector for star fields for Planetariums, but the optic train design to get blacks (high contrast)with ambient light is very complex and expensive – not streamlined.Note: Kodak Patents –Two patents that are considered important for IMAX/ BARCO portfolioKodak US Patent: 6648476—Nov. 2003: Broad Band Color: states that 4 laser colors are needed for fullspectrum: Blue Green (cyan) – 488 -490 nm is claimed the best added color with Red, Green, and Blue.Diagrams describe why. The claims do not specify colors but suggest different areas of modulation.Troyer claims 2001: 635 nm red and above mixed with blue and green with additional cyan -488 nm.IMAX/ Barco/Kodak represent they are delivering blasts of light, flooding like the arc lamp. Kodakpatent Oct. 2011. Beam Alignment System: 2D arrays of parallel light beams. This approach combinesstacked parallel laser expanded lines into a “static” flood. This process produces heat and artifacts inthe image. Contrast is considerably reduced as with the flood with arc lamp projectors (light bleeds intothe black). The Troyer patent claims method is KISS: keep it simple streamline. The Troyer claims arebroad and cover all ways of addressing laser light to a spatial light modulator (reflective light valve).Metatron Inc. (California Company from 1992 – 2001): Paul Holliman was assisting Roy Disney inpreparing the Disney release of the classic reissues of early animation features, the first being Fantasiafor dome presentation. Holliman had helped arrange for the Troyer team to demonstrate at the San JoseTech Museum on Hackworth IMAX dome where Fantasia was playing (2000). Roy Disney was quite 7excited about the Troyer invention and the ability to automatically adjust to dome screens. He had Page
  8. 8. attended an earlier Metatron showing and felt that the laser video images were as good as film. Alsothe Metatron would eliminate the costly film prints ($30,000 each) and the films ready for domes.The Metatron large frame gas lasers fit into the same infrastructure same electricity and water coolingas IMAX arc lamps. The IMAX bulky film projectors need constant technologist support. It is estimatedreplacing and changing arc lamps costs the theater at least $30,000 a year. The expensive arc lamp hasto be changed every 500 hours and might blow up so the technician has to wear protective clothing.http://www.thetech.org/imax/about-imaxFilm adjusted for domes: The film is transferred to digital with a telecine; then each frame is softwareadjusted so the image is in focus on the 185 degree screen; The digital is transferred to the 75 mmmaster and IMAX film prints (costs near 6 million). Today the same process is followed for IMAX domefilms (Avatar). It is called projection mapping. Yes the price has come down, but it is still cost prohibitive.The Museum and Science Centers dome model is not sustainable (pay IMAX half the ticket sales andcostly monthly lease). The community has to raise money to keep the IMAX dome screens open. Theplanetariums and other big film screens such as IWERKS are presented with the same problem.Why IMAX Needs a Digital Solution for Big Screens: IMAX needs to have a solution or their stock willcrash. So the IMAX CEO states they have laser digital dome patent rights from Kodak. Maybe IMAXshould have made a deal with Metatron Inc. in 2000 (Troyer’s California Company)? Gas lasers wouldhave been much less expensive and more user friendly than the big IMAX arc lamps. Using interactivelaser produced video instead of film would have saved a fortune and provided a new revenue stream.Best IMAX theater venues would not have had exorbitant film costs – for domes and flat big screens.Famous Players (Canada) attended the dome demonstration. Famous Players ordered 8 laser projectorsfor their big screens (they owned their theaters and did not lease from IMAX). There were 46 theaterowners waiting from their European sister company. Barry Blackburn from Famous Players and hisinvited guests jumped up screaming, excited at what they saw. The Las Vegas boxing match played inthe video player through the Metatron Laser projector automatically adjusted to the dome screen, theboxers hovering in space, the red blood flying. Also views were shown of a DVD of Fifth Element. Whatwas most surprising is that the infinite sharp images automatically had depth on the dome, theforeground and background separating. Thus the images appeared dimensional (3D) without glasses.The real time adjusted dome images had edges crisper than the Fantasia film print. The IMAX operative(uninvited) watched for five minutes and then had the water and power turned off and the theatersdoors locked, not letting the waiting and very disappointed Disney, Lucas and Technicolorrepresentatives into the theater.Metatron Z*TV Hackworth IMAX Dome (San Jose). The Review of IMAX Metatron Image: The videoimages are filmic (sharp. high contrast, vivid saturated colors). The images are in focus on the domecurve and have depth. There is no ghosting in fast moving images. The Troyer preferred approach isresolution agnostic. The vivid sharp images have no enlarged pixels. Even on the 85 ft. wide dome.http://www.slideshare.net/metatroy/metaztron-holographic-z-depth-factorhttp://www.slideshare.net/metatroy/hive-zelf-holograph-immersive-virtual-laser-meta-ztron-troyerMetatron (Z*Tron Vision): Page 43. Notes about the mentoring of Roy Disney and Al Mirabella from 8Disney theme parks and Imagineering and receiving the first laser projector patent in 1994. Page
  9. 9. 1. Troyer Patent US 6183092 February 6, 2001 http://www.everypatent.com/comp/pat6183092.htmlInventor: TroyerDate Issued: February 6, 2001Application: 09/071,398Filed: May 1, 1998Inventors: Troyer; Diane (Sherman Oaks, CA)Assignee:Primary Dowling; WilliamExaminer:AssistantExaminer:Attorney Or Ashen & LippmanAgent:U.S. Class: 349/22; 353/31; 359/197Field Of Search: 353/31; 353/33; 353/34; 353/37; 353/122; 349/22; 349/5; 348/751; 348/761; 348/766; 348/790; 359/197; 359/212; 359/215; 359/221; 359/223U.S Patent 5255082; 5317348; 5465174; 5506597; 5517263; 5537258; 5700076; 5729374Documents:AbstractLaser lines at 635 nm or longer (ideally 647 nm) are preferred for red, giving energy-efficient, bright,rapid-motion images with rich, full film-comparable colors. Green and blue lines are used too--and cyanretained for best color mixing, an extra light-power boost, and aid in speckle suppression. Speckle issuppressed through beam-path displacement--by deflecting the beam during projection, therebyavoiding both absorption and diffusion of the beam while preserving pseudo collimation (non-crossingrays). The latter in turn is important to infinite sharpness. Path displacement is achieved by scanning thebeam on the liquid-crystal valves (LCLVs), which also provides several enhancements--in energyefficiency, brightness, contrast, beam uniformity (by suppressing both laser- mode ripple and artifacts),and convenient beam-turning to transfer the beam between apparatus tiers. Preferably deflection isperformed by a mirror mounted on a galvanometer or motor for rotary oscillation; images are writtenincrementally on successive portions of the LCLV control stage (either optical or electronic) while thelaser "reading beam" is synchronized on the output stage. The beam is shaped, with very little energyloss to masking, into a shallow cross-section which is shifted on the viewing screen as well as the LCLVs.Beam-splitter/analyzer cubes are preferred over polarizing sheets. Spatial modulation provided by anLCLV and maintained by pseudo collimation enables imaging on irregular projection media.34 ClaimsI claim:1. A laser projector comprising: a laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible 9laser light of wavelength about six hundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer; Page
  10. 10. a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image; andfurther laser apparatus for projecting one or more picture beams that include green and blue light; andwherein the laser light of wavelength of about 635 nanometers or longer mixes with the green and bluelaser light to provide substantially pure neutral colors including pure white and pure black;wherein the further laser apparatus projects substantially cyan light with the blue and green light;wherein the laser light of wavelength about 635 nanometers or longer sometimes generates visiblespeckle when used to form a picture on a projection medium; and further comprising means for at leastpartly suppressing visible speckle when present in such a picture;said suppressing means comprising the combination of: means for displacing the beam substantially as aunit, during its projection; said light of wavelength about 635 nanometers or longer; and said cyan light.TROYER NOTE: This claim covers full spectrum color (using deeper red—635 nm. red- than the art waspreviously). Also Cyan is added which suggests also using the secondary colors of yellow, magenta, andcyan (488 nm.) Thus great blacks and whites can be created and speckle is reduced with the broadspectrum colors. Full color spectrum is created with lasers that are addressed to a reflective light valve(RLV). The claim was broadened to all RLV in US 2006 and Canadian patent Feb. 28, 2011. The art beforestated that orange red (610 nm.) had to be used for more brightness and to match the NTSC (TV) analogcolor chart. This orange red caused more speckle because of the shimmer. The claim with 635 nm red orabove thus covers full spectrum filmic color with speckle repression with a reflective light valve (RLV). Alldigital cinema projectors use RLV--- DLP. LCoS, LED, or any to be invented.2. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laser light of wavelength about sixhundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer;a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image; andfurther laser apparatus for projecting one or more picture beams that include green and blue laser light;wherein the laser light of wavelength about 635 nanometers or longer mixes with the green and bluelaser light to provide substantially pure neutral colors including pure white and pure black; andwherein the laser light of wavelength about 635 nanometers or longer sometimes generates visiblespeckle when used to form a picture on a projection medium; andfurther comprising means for at least partly suppressing visible speckle when present in such a picture;said suppressing means comprising the combination of:means for displacing the beam substantially as a unit during its projection; and 10said light of wavelength about 635 nanometers or longer. Page
  11. 11. 3. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laser light of wavelength about sixhundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer;a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image; andfurther laser apparatus for projecting one or more picture beams that include green and blue laser light;wherein the laser light of wavelength about 635 nanometers or longer mixes with the green and bluelaser light to provide substantially pure neutral colors including pure white and pure black; andthe liquid-crystal light valve is controlled by light generated substantially in response to a type oftraditional broadcast video signals;and substantially no color correction or gamma adjustment is applied to remove any color-balanceeffect of using 635-nanometer or longer-wavelength laser light instead of broadcast video standard red.4. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for protecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of wavelength about six hundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer; and a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image;wherein the laser light sometimes generates visible speckle when used to form a picture on a projectionmedium;and further comprising means for at least partly suppressing visible speckle when present in such apicture; said suppressing means comprising means for displacing the beam substantially as a unit duringits projection.5. The projector of claim 4, wherein: said suppressing means further comprise said light of wavelengthabout 635 nanometers or longer, in combination with the displacing means.6. The projector of claim 5: wherein the liquid-crystal light valve has a beam-modulation stage forimpressing the desired image onto the beam, and a control stage to control said impressing;and further comprising: means for writing an image incrementally onto successive portions of thecontrol stage; and means for directing the beam onto successive selected portions of the modulationstage, and for generally synchronizing the directing means with the image-writing means.7. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for protecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of wavelength about six hundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer;a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image; 11wherein the liquid-crystal light valve has a beam-modulation stage for impressing the desired image Pageonto the beam, and a control stage to control said impressing;
  12. 12. means for writing an image incrementally onto successive portions of the control stage; andmeans for directing the beam onto successive selected portions of the modulation stage, and forgenerally synchronizing the directing means with the image-writing means.8. A laser projector for use in forming an image on an irregular projection medium having portions atdistinctly different distances from the projectors said projector comprising:TROYER NOTE: This would be domes, Cinerama, simulation, immersion, etc.laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laser light of wavelength about sixhundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer;a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image;wherein the liquid-crystal light valve operates by introducing at least partial disruption of the laser-lightcoherence; andmeans for projecting the picture beam onto such irregular projection medium to form an image thatappears substantially sharp on said portions of distinctly different distances, notwithstanding said atleast partial disruption of coherence.9. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for projecting along a path a picture beam that includes laser light which sometimesgenerates visible speckle when used to form a picture on a projection medium, said path having an axis;andmeans for at least partly suppressing visible speckle when in such a picture; andthe suppressing means comprising means for displacing the axis of the path during projection of beam.10. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for protecting along a path a picture beam that includes laser light which sometimesgenerates visible speckle when used to form a picture on a projection medium;means for at least Partly suppressing visible speckle when in such a picture;the suppressing means comprising means for displacing the path during projection of the beam; anda liquid-crystal light valve having a beam-modulation stage for impressing an image onto the beam; andwherein:the displacing means scan the beam over the beam-modulation stage during said projection.11. The projector of claim 10, wherein:the displacing means comprise an optical deflecting element mounted for mechanical rotation. 1212. The projector of claim 11, wherein: Pagethe deflecting means comprise an optical deflecting element mounted for mechanical rotation.
  13. 13. 13. The projector of claim 12, wherein:the deflecting element comprises a mirror mounted on a galvanometer or motor.14. The projector of claim 13, wherein:the mirror is mounted for rotation about an axis substantially in a reflective surface of the mirror.15. The projector of claim 10:the light valve also having a control stage to control said impressing; and further comprising:means for writing an image incrementally onto successive portions of the control stage; andmeans for controlling the displacing means to direct the beam onto successive selected portions of themodulation stage, and to generally synchronize the beam with the image-writing means.16. The projector of claim 15, wherein:the control stage is a photosensitive stage that receives an incrementally written optical image.17. The projector of claim 15, wherein:the control stage comprises an electrode matrix that receives incrementally written electrical voltages.18. The projector of claim 10, for use in forming an image on an irregular projection medium havingportions at distinctly different distances from the projector, wherein:the displacing means are substantially nondiffusing; andthe liquid-crystal light valve operates by introducing at least partial disruption of the laser-lightcoherence; and further comprising:means for projecting the picture beam onto such irregular projection medium to form an image thatappears substantially sharp on said portions of distinctly different distances, notwithstanding said atleast partial disruption of coherence.19. The projector of claim 9, wherein:the displacing means are substantially lossless, to within one percent of beam intensity.20. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for projecting along a Path a picture beam that includes laser light which sometimesgenerates visible speckle when used to form a picture on a projection medium;means for at least partly suppressing visible speckle when in such a picture;the suppressing means comprising means for displacing the path during projection of the beam; and 13beam-expansion means; andwherein the displacing means and beam-expansion means cooperate to achieve a net gain in light- Pageenergy efficiency.
  14. 14. 21. The projector of claim 20, wherein:the gain in efficiency approaches approximately fifty-six percent, in comparison with masking off originalcircular edges of the laser beam.22. The projector of claim 20, wherein:for a projection-surface aspect ratio of four to three, the gain in efficiency approaches approximatelysixty-four percent, in comparison with masking off original circular edges of the laser beam.23. The projector of claim 20, wherein:for a projection-surface aspect ratio of sixteen to nine, the gain in efficiency approaches approximatelyeighty-five percent, in comparison with masking off original circular edges of the laser beam.24. The projector of claim 20, wherein:the displacing means and beam-expansion means also cooperate to substantially eliminate initialnonuniformity of brightness in the beam.25. The projector of claim 9, wherein:the laser apparatus comprises one or more lasers; andevery laser in the laser apparatus is exclusively a solid-state laser.26. The projector of claim 9, wherein:said projection medium has a shape;the laser apparatus comprises optical means for shaping the picture beam to a cross-sectional shapeshallower than the shape of said projection medium; andthe displacing means also shift the picture beam on the projection medium, during said projection.27. The projector of claim 26, wherein the optical means are selected from the group consisting of:plural lenses in series for adjusting the beam dimension in two substantially perpendicular directions;and a curved mirror that forms part of the displacing means.28. The projector of claim 26, further comprising:a liquid-crystal light valve having a beam-modulation stage for impressing an image onto the beam, saidmodulation stage having a cross-sectional shape; and wherein:the displacing means comprise a curved mirror that shapes the picture beam to a cross-sectional shapeshallower than the cross-sectional shape of said modulation stage; andsaid curved mirror is mounted in a galvanometer movement or motor, to scan the shaped beam oversaid modulation stage. 1429. A laser projector comprising: Pagelaser apparatus for forming a picture beam that includes laser light;
  15. 15. said laser apparatus producing an initially substantially circular laser-light beam subject to nonuniformillumination;means for transmitting a beam out of the projector for viewing by an audience as images on asubstantially rectangular viewing screen that has a shape; andmeans for forming an illuminated image on the substantially rectangular viewing screen by using thecircular laser-light beam without masking off significant fractions of the laser-light beam;said illuminated-image-forming means comprising:means for reshaping the initially circular laser light beam to a laser-light beam of shallower shape thansaid shape of the substantially rectangular viewing screen, andmeans for scanning the reshaped laser-light beam over the screen.30. The projector of claim 29, further comprising:means for minimizing the influence of nonuniformity of illumination in the initially substantially circularlaser-light beam;said minimizing means comprising said reshaping and scanning means;wherein the reshaping and scanning means cause said nonuniformity to at least partially average out.31. The projector of claim 29, wherein:the reshaping means introduce additional illumination nonuniformity along the width of the shallow,wide laser-light beam; andthe illuminated-image-forming means further comprise means for compensating for the additionalillumination nonuniformity.32. A laser projection system for forming an image on an irregular Projection medium having portions atdistinctly differing distances from the projector; said system comprising:laser apparatus for protecting a picture beam that includes laser light;a liquid-crystal light valve for impressing an image onto the beam; andmeans for protecting the beam from the light valve, with said impressed image, onto such irregularprojection medium;wherein the liquid-crystal light valve operates by partial disruption of laser-light coherence in the beam;and further comprising means for, notwithstanding said partial disruption of coherence, causing theimage to appear sharp on said projection-medium portions of differing distances. 1533. The system of claim 32, wherein: Pagethe image appears substantially evenly illuminated, except when light is distributed on receding surface.
  16. 16. 34. A laser projection system for forming an image on an irregular projection medium which comprises acurved screen or dome having an image-receiving area that has a shape and that has portions atdistinctly differing distances from the projector; said system comprising:laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes laser light;a liquid-crystal light valve for impressing an image onto the beam; andmeans for projecting the beam from the light valve, with said impressed image, onto such irregularprojection medium; and whereinthe laser apparatus comprises means for shaping the beam to have a cross-sectional shape shallowerthan the shape of such image-receiving area, and means for scanning the beam on such irregularprojection medium; andthe beam at such irregular projection medium is substantially uniform in distribution across its cross-section.Troyer Patent US 6910774 June 28, 2005TROYER NOTE: The main patent 2005 claims cover full color spectrum images with reflective lightvalves. One light valve or many can be used. Troyer wanted to broaden reflective light valve – instead ofliquid crystal light valve. The patent typist did not remove the liquid crystal part. Claims cover full colorspectrum (635 nm. red and over with a reflective light valve (RLV) that modulates the beam). The subclaims cover mixing with green and blue all in one RLV or with multiple light valves.http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6910774.htmlhttp://www.patentgenius.com/patent/6910774.htmlInventor: TroyerDate Issued: June 28, 2005Application: 09/778,940Filed: February 5, 2001Inventors: Troyer; Diane (Sherman Oaks, CA)Assignee:Primary Examiner: Dowling; William C.Assistant Examiner:Attorney Or Agent: Carter; Ryan N.U.S. Class: 349/22; 353/31; 353/79 16Dowling, William C. Page
  17. 17. Claims1. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of wavelength equal to six hundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer; and a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image.TROYER NOTE: June 6, 2006 patent claims (divisional) and Canadian patent claims (Feb. 29, 2011)broaden the claims to reflective light valve (RLV): LCOS, DLP. MEMS, LED, OLED or any to be invented.2. The projector of claim 1, wherein: light that appears red in the beam comprises substantially only saidlaser light of wavelength equal to 635 nanometers or longer.3. The projector of claim 2, further comprising: means for also incorporating blue and green laser lightinto the picture beam; and separate, additional reflective liquid-crystal light valves for modulating theblue and green light respectively.4. The projector of claim 2, wherein: said light valve also receives blue and green laser light formodulation, within the same light valve.5. The projector of claim 2, further comprising: means for scanning the beam across a face of the lightvalve during projection of each image, rather than flooding the entire face substantially simultaneously.6. The projector of claim 5, further comprising: means for also incorporating blue and green laser lightinto the picture beam; and separate, additional reflective liquid-crystal light valves for modulating theblue and green light respectively.7. The projector of claim 2, wherein: said light light also receives blue and green laser light formodulation, within the same light valve.8. The projector of claim 5, wherein: the laser apparatus comprises no solid-state lasers, but ratherexclusively lasers of gas type.9. The projector of claim 2, wherein: the laser apparatus comprises no solid-state lasers, but ratherexclusively lasers of gas type.10. The projector of claim 1, further comprising: further laser apparatus for projecting one or morebeams that include green and blue laser light; and wherein the laser light of wavelength equal to 635nanometers or longer mixes with the green and blue laser light to provide substantially pure neutralcolors including pure white and pure black.11. The projector of claim 10, further comprising: means for receiving high-bandwidth red, green andblue computer-monitor signals from a computer; wherein the projector serves as a high-color-fidelitycomputer monitor.12. The projector of claim 10, wherein: the liquid-crystal light valve is not controlled by light derivedfrom traditional broadcast video signals. 1713. The projector of claim 12, wherein the liquid-crystal light valve is controlled by light or control signals Pageapplied to the valve by writing onto a control stage of the valve: a vector, bitmap or other computer file
  18. 18. scanned from an image or generated in a computer, or amplitude-modulated laser-diode illuminationswept two-dimensionally across the control stage, or images from a small transmissive liquid-crystaldisplay modulator, in turn written by signals not derived from traditional broadcast video signals, orother entire frames without interlace, or motion-picture film color separations, or a still image from aslide or overhead-projection transparency, or a color separation made therefrom, or a live imageoptically coupled, without electronic intermediary, to the control stage.14. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of wavelength about six hundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer; and a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image; and wherein: light that appears red inthe beam comprises substantially only said laser light of wavelength about 635 nanometers or longer:the laser apparatus comprises no solid-state lasers, but rather exclusively lasers of gas type; and saidapparatus projects a beam in which light that appears red is of wavelength between about 635 and 650nanometers.15. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of wavelength about six hundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer; and a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image; and wherein: said apparatus projects abeam in which light that appears red is of wavelength substantially 647 nanometers.16. The projector of claim 15, wherein: the image is a moving picture.17. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of wavelength about six hundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer; a reflective liquid-crystallight valve for modulating the beam with a desired image; and further laser apparatus for projecting oneor more beams that include green and blue laser light; wherein the laser light of wavelength about 635nanometers or longer mixes with the green and blue laser light to provide substantially pure neutralcolors including pure white and pure black; and the further laser apparatus projects substantially cyannative laser light with the blue or green light, or both.18. The projector of claim 10, wherein: the first-mentioned laser apparatus and the further laserapparatus, considered together, comprise one or more lasers; and every laser in the first-mentionedlaser apparatus and the further laser apparatus is exclusively a solid-state laser.19. The projector of claim 10, wherein: the first-mentioned laser apparatus and the further laserapparatus, considered together, comprise one or more lasers; and every laser in the first-mentionedlaser apparatus and the further laser apparatus is exclusively a gas laser.20. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of wavelength about six hundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer; a reflective liquid-crystallight valve for modulating the beam with a desired image; and further laser apparatus for projecting oneor more picture beams that include green and blue laser light; wherein the proportions of light power ofthe about 635-nanometers or longer-wavelength laser light, the green laser light and the blue laser lightare roughly eight to six to five (8:6:5). 1821. The projector of claim 10, further comprising: means for also incorporating the blue and green laserlight into said picture beam; and separate, additional reflective liquid-crystal light valves for modulating Pagethe blue and green light respectively.
  19. 19. 22. The projector of claim 10, wherein: said light valve also receives the blue and green laser light formodulation, within the same light valve.23. A laser projection system for forming a sharp image on an irregular projection medium havingportions at distinctly differing distances from the projector; said system comprising: laser apparatus forprojecting a picture beam that includes laser light; a liquid-crystal light valve for impressing a sharpimage onto the beam; and means for projecting the beam from the light valve, with said impressedimage being displayed sharply on substantially all such portions, at distinctly different distances, of suchirregular projection medium as a show for an audience.24. The system of claim 23, wherein: the irregular projection medium comprises one or more projectionmedia selected from the group consisting of: an interior of a dome, or other building having internalsurfaces that are not generally normal to a projection direction, an exterior of a dome, sculpture,monument, or other structure having external surfaces that are not generally normal to a projectiondirection, a waterfall, a water fountain, fog or a cloud, ice, a scrim in front of a curtain or screen, aplurality of scrims in optical series, one or more trees, grass, vines or other foliage, a hillside or otherlandscape, or other receding surface, and an array of people or other animals or other discrete objects,or combinations thereof, at diverse distances from the projecting means; and the projecting meansdisplay a protracted show on the one or more projection media, for the audience.25. The system of claim 24, further comprising: such irregular projection medium.26. The system of claim 23, further comprising: such irregular projection medium.27. The system of claim 23, wherein: the laser apparatus comprises one or more lasers; and every laserin the laser apparatus is exclusively a solid-state laser.28. The projector of claim 24: wherein the laser apparatus projects red laser light in the picture beam;and the light valve impresses red components of an image onto the red laser light; and furthercomprising: means for also incorporating blue and green laser light into the picture beam, and separate,additional liquid-crystal light valves for respectively impressing blue and green components of the imageonto the blue and green light.29. The projector of claim 24, wherein: said light valve receives laser light components of threerespective colors and impresses corresponding color components of the image onto the three respectivelight components, respectively, all within the same light valve.30. A laser projection system for forming an image on an irregular projection medium having portions atdistinctly differing distances from the projector; said system comprising: laser apparatus for projecting apicture beam that includes laser light; a liquid-crystal light valve for impressing an image onto the beam;and means for projecting the beam from the light valve, with said impressed image, onto such irregularprojection medium to form a substantially sharp image on such medium at such distinctly differingdistances.31. The system of claim 30, wherein: the irregular projection medium comprises one or more projectionmedia selected from the group consisting of: an interior of a dome, or other building having internal 19surfaces that are not generally normal to a projection direction, an exterior of a dome, sculpture,monument, or other structure having external surfaces that are not generally normal to a projection Pagedirection, a waterfall, a water fountain, fog or a cloud, ice, a scrim in front of a curtain or screen, a
  20. 20. plurality of scrims in optical series, one or more trees, grass, vines or other foliage, a hillside or otherlandscape, or other receding surface, and an array of people or other animals or other discrete objects,or combinations thereof, at diverse distances from the projecting means; and the projection meansform the substantially sharp image on substantially each element of the selected one or more media.32. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of wavelength longer than 640 nanometers; and a reflective liquid-crystal light valve for modulatingthe beam with a desired image.33. The projector of claim 32, wherein: beam is of wavelength substantially 647 nanometers.34. The projector of claim 32: wherein the light valve impresses red components of an image onto thelaser light of wavelength near 640 nanometers; and further comprising: means for also incorporatingblue and green laser light into the picture beam, and separate, additional liquid-crystal light valves forrespectively impressing blue and green components of the image onto the blue and green light.35. The projector of claim 32, wherein: said light valve receives laser light components of threerespective colors and impresses corresponding color components of the image onto the three respectivelight components, respectively, all within the same light valve.Troyer Patent June 6, 2006 US 7055957This patent can be licensed separately. The claims broadens to all reflective light valveshttp://www.freepatentsonline.com/7055957.htmlhttp://www.google.com/patents/US7055957Inventor: TroyerDate Issued: June 6, 2006Application: 10/946,081Filed: September 21, 2004Inventors: Troyer; Diane (Kalona, IA)Assignee:Primary Dowling; William C.Examiner:AssistantExaminer:Attorney Or Carter; Ryan N.Agent:U.S. Class: 349/25; 349/5; 353/31; 359/197Field Of Search: 353/31; 353/33; 353/34; 353/37; 353/122; 359/197; 359/212; 359/215; 359/216; 359/221; 359/223; 348/751; 348/761; 348/766; 349/2; 349/4; 349/25; 349/5International 20 G03B 21/14Class:Claim: Page
  21. 21. 1. A laser projector comprising: laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes exclusivelylaser light of wavelength about six hundred thirty-five (635) nanometers or longer; a reflective lightvalve having a beam-modulation stage for impressing an image onto the exclusively laser- light beamand having a control stage, distinct from the beam-modulation stage, to control said impressing; meansfor writing an image incrementally onto successive generally slot-shaped portions of the control stage;and means for directing the exclusively laser-light beam onto successive selected generally slot-shapedportions of the modulation stage, and for generally synchronizing the exclusively laser-light beam withthe image-writing means; wherein the laser apparatus initially projects the exclusively laser-light picturebeam having substantially all rays substantially parallel to a common optical axis, with substantially noray crossing the optical axis or otherwise passing through the center of any aperture stop; wherein theprojector therefore has no telecentric zone; and the exclusively laser-light picture beam is not focused ator near the directing means or the modulation stage, or elsewhere within the laser projector.2. The projector of claim 1, wherein: the reflective light valve includes a substantially distinct spatialportion for modulation of each distinct spatial portion of the exclusively laser-light beam, respectively.3. The projector of claim 2, wherein: the projected beam has a cross-section that is substantially uniformin intensity rather than having a Gaussian intensity distribution.4. The projector of claim 3, wherein: substantially the entire cross-section of the exclusively laser-lightbeam, with negligible masking, is directed onto said successive selected portions of modulation stage.5. The projector of claim 1, wherein: substantially each control-stage portion has a substantiallycorresponding modulation-stage portion; and the directing-and-synchronizing means generallysynchronize selection of modulation-stage portions with writing at corresponding successive control-stage portions, subject to a delay generally equal to rise time in the modulation stage.6. The projector of claim 1, wherein: the directing means comprise a curved mirror that shapes thepicture beam to a shallow cross-section; and said curved mirror is mounted in a galvanometermovement or motor, to scan the shaped beam across said modulation stage.7. The projector of claim 1, wherein: the directing means comprise a curved mirror that shapes thepicture beam to a shallow cross-section; and said curved mirror is mounted to a rotating disc forscanning the shaped beam across said modulation stage.8. The projector of claim 1, further comprising: means for reflecting the beam from the directing meansinto the beam-modulation stage and for transmitting the beam, after return from the beam-modulationstage, to form a picture on a projection medium; and wherein: the laser apparatus is generally disposedon a first level; the light valve, writing means, and reflecting-and-transmitting means are generallydisposed on a second level above or below the first level; and the directing means also transfer thebeam from the first level to the second level.9. The projector of claim 8, wherein: the directing means turn the beam from a path generallyassociated with the first level to propagate in a direction generally perpendicular to that path, towardthe second level. 2110. The laser projector of claim 1 wherein the laser light is a substantially white laser beam comprised of Pageamplitude-modulated color imaging information; wherein the substantially white laser light is formed by
  22. 22. the combination of a red laser beam having a laser light of wavelength of about 635 nanometers orlonger, and laser beam of blue and green wavelengths so that the white light contains a full colorspectrum.11. The laser projector of claim 10 wherein the substantially white laser light further comprises at leastone additional laser beam; said additional laser beam having a wavelength of about 488 nanometersTroyer Note: This claim suggests that the secondary colors are included with the Red. Blue andgreen. Secondary colors are yellow, magenta, and cyan (488 nm).12. The projector of claim 1, further comprising: means for reflecting the laser light beam from thedirecting means into the beam-modulation stage and for transmitting the beam, after return from thebeam-modulation stage; means of to form a sharp in focus picture on an irregular projection medium;;wherein the laser apparatus is generally disposed on a first level and the light valve, writing means, andreflecting-and-transmitting means are generally disposed on a second level..Troyer Note: means dome, simulation, curved screen or irregular screen like water screen, balloon,sculpture having portions at distinctly different distances from the projector13. The projector of claim 1, further comprising: means for reflecting the beam from the directing meansinto the beam-modulation stage and for transmitting the beam after return from the beam-modulationstage, means to form a sharp in focus picture on an irregular projection medium; having portions atdistinctly different distances from the projector; and wherein the laser apparatus generally retains thecollimation and the spatial modulation is preserved in the propagating laser beam.Troyer Note: This is the magic that makes possible always in focus sharp images on domes, simulation—also this makes possible the 2D to 3D in the fact that the sharp spatially modulated images that arealways in focus create automatic depth in curved space or with volume flat screens).14. The laser projector of claim 1, further comprising a means of preserving the pseudo collimation(non-crossing rays) of the laser beams to form a sharp image on an irregular projection medium havingportions at distinctly differing distance from the laser apparatus.Troyer Note: Dome half screen, Cinerama, Simulation, CAVE/ HIVE—holographic immersive virtualenvironments. 22 Page
  23. 23. Troyer US Patent February 14, 2012 8113660 Projector and Camera with Dimensional Sharp Full Spectrum Color Dimensional Images IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE Applicant: Diane Troyer Invention: Laser Projection Apparatus with LIQUID-CRYSTAL LIGHT VALVES AND SCANNING READING BEAM February 14, 2012 Serial No: 8113660 Filed: 04/20/2006 Group Art Unit: 2878 Examiner: WILLIAM C. DOWLINGClaims1. A laser apparatus (projector) comprising: a camera having an image sensor for gathering an image; a laser modulator for receiving a signal from the image sensor then projecting the image as a picture beam, wherein the beam that is projected includes visible laser light having a wavelength of 635 nanometers red or longer; a reflective light valve for modulating the beam; and means for addressing the laser beam on the face of the light valve during projection of said desired image; wherein the projector produces collimated spatially modulated laser beams that produce sharp images with depth.2. The laser apparatus of claim 1, wherein: the camera has a means for providing depth enhancement scalability and means to separate the visible light into red, green and blue color information.3. The laser apparatus of claim 1 further comprising: means for incorporating blue and green laser light into the picture beam and separate additional reflective light valves for modulating the blue and green light respectively.4. The laser apparatus of claim 1, wherein: said reflective light valve also receives blue and green laser light for modulation.5. The laser apparatus claim 1, wherein said reflective light valve is a liquid-crystal reflective light valve.6. The 1aser apparatus for claim 1, wherein: the beams also include green and blue laser light and wherein the laser light of wavelength equal to 635 nanometers or longer mixes 23 with the green and blue laser light to provide substantially pure neutral colors including pure white and pure black. Page
  24. 24. 7. The laser apparatus for claim 6, wherein: the laser projector is adapted to project substantially cyan colored light with the blue light and the green light.8. The 1aser apparatus of claim 1, wherein: the laser projector projects purple, magenta, and deep honey.9. The laser apparatus of claim 8, wherein: collimation is retained in the laser beams, thus the spatial modulation is preserved in the propagating laser beam producing infinite sharp dimensional colored images.10. The1aser apparatus of claim 9, further comprising: means for at least partly suppressing visible speckle in a picture formed by said laser light on a projection medium.11. The1aser apparatus of claim 1, further comprising: means for providing sharp high-bandwidth depth red, green and blue computer-monitor signals from a computer; wherein the projector serves as a high-color-fidelity computer monitor.12. The1aser apparatus of claim 1 wherein: the reflective light valve is controlled by light and control signals applied to the reflective light valve from the camera captured images wherein the reflective light valve is controlled by light and control signals from film, slide images. transparencies. electronically based media and video, direct live images, LCOS, OLED, DLP, and LED.13. The1aser apparatus of claim 1, wherein the reflective light valve is controlled by light and control signals of a multi-phase or multi-field imaging system.14. The laser apparatus of claim 1, wherein the reflective light valve is controlled by light and control signals from camera capture of a live image of a stage performer and is amplified on a big screen.15. The laser apparatus of claim 1, wherein the reflective light valve is controlled by signals from a live image or hologram optically coupled, without electronic intermediary.16. A laser apparatus of claim 1, wherein the reflective light valve is controlled by signals sent from one or more of the following devices: microscope, telescope, MRI, endoscope.17. The laser apparatus of claim 1, wherein: the light valve has a beam-modulation stage for impressing the desired image onto the beam, and a control stage to control said impressing; and 24 the projector further comprises: means for writing an image incrementally onto successive portions of the Page control stage; and
  25. 25. means for directing the beam onto successive selected portions of the modulation stage, and means for generally synchronizing the directing means with the image-writing means.18. The laser apparatus of claim 1, for wherein: forming an image on an irregular projection medium having portions at distinctly different distances from the projector wherein: the light valve operates by introducing at least partial disruption of the laser light coherence; and comprising means for amplifying the camera picture onto such irregular projection medium to form a dimensional image that appears substantially sharp on said portions of distinctly different distances.19. The laser apparatus of claim 1, wherein: the beam delivers full spectrum colored dimension images that amplify and correlate to the camera information, and form moving pictures that automatically adjust to a shaped screen.20. A laser projector system for forming amplified enhanced imagines with infinite sharp depth for laser projection in curved space, said system comprising: a camera having image enhancement capabilities; a laser projector in communication with the camera for projecting a spatial modulated full color picture beam that includes laser light; the laser projector having a reflective light valve for impressing a sharp image onto the beam; means for scanning the beam across a face of the light valve during projection of a spatial modulated picture beam.21. A laser projector system of 20, wherein the laser projector is adapted to project the spatial modulated full color dimensional picture beam on convex or concave screens and CAVE; at diverse distances from the projecting means; and the projecting means displays a protracted show with sharp dimensional images on the one or more projection media including interior or exterior staging scrims for opera, performance, TV stages, CAVE, HIVE- holographic immersive virtual environments22. The laser projector system of claim 20 wherein: the image is delivered to the camera through optically switched images or optically multi-dimensional imaging.23. The laser projector system of claim 20 wherein: the camera is adapted to receive images from a microscope, telescope, endoscope, MIR, testing instrument.24. The laser projector system of claim 20 wherein a direct image is transmitted to the laser projector by CID, CCD, MEMS, LED, DLP, LCOS, OLED, or other device that provides imaging information. 2525. A laser projector comprising: Page a laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam;
  26. 26. a reflective light valve having a camera control stage that is addressed by low power amplified-modulated lasers; means to scan modulated lasers with multiple axis; said laser projector has a beam- modulation stage for imprinting images onto colored lasers, the laser color including having a wavelength of 635 nanometers or longer; means to scan the colored beams retaining the infinite depth of sharpness of the projected image; wherein the laser beams are substantially parallel rays, and retain the inherent polarization and collimation of the laser beam.26. The laser projector of claim 25 further comprising means for scanning collimated reading beams in sync with the writing information.27. The laser projector of claim 25 having increased resolution: wherein the reflective light valve has a writing control stage; means to deliver multiple imaging defining devices; and mean for combining the imaging defining devices to deliver imaging information.Troyer Canadian Patent 2,372, 833 issued January 15, 2013The Canadian patent office is very thorough – and looks at all prior art. The global patent data bases aremuch more up to date in 2012 with great search engines. Receiving a Canadian patent provides strongvalidation for the India and Mexican patents and also the 4 USA patents. The Canada claims are broadcovering all reflective light valves. The patent claims have been edited to be simple and very clear, sothere is no question of what is covered in the patents.Canadian Patents DatabasePatent Summary (12) Patent: (11) CA 2372833 (54) English LASER PROJECTION APPARATUS WITH LIGHT VALVE AND SCANNING Title: READING BEAM (54) French APPAREIL DE PROJECTION LASER AVEC SOUPAPE DECLAIRAGE ET FAISCEAU Title: DE LECTURE/BALAYAGERepresentative Drawing 26 Page
  27. 27. AbstractsEnglish AbstractA laser projection system wherein speckle is suppressed through beam-pathdisplacement, by deflecting the beam during projection, thereby avoiding bothabsorption and diffusion of the beam while preserving pseudocollimation(noncrossing rays). Path displacement is achieved by scanning the beam onliquid crystal light valves (LCLVs) (30), which also provide enhancements -in energy efficiency, brightness, contrast, beam uniformity (by suppressingboth laser-mode ripple and artifacts). Preferably deflection is performed by amirror (20) mounted on a galvanometer or motor (21) for oscillation; imagesare written incrementally on successive portions of an LCLV control stagewhile the laser "reading beam" is synchronized on an output stage. Beamsplitter analyzer cubes (25) are preferred over polarizing sheets.French AbstractLes lignes laser à 635 nm ou plus (idéalement 647 nm) sont préférées pour le rouge, donnantdes images, satisfaisantes du point de vue énergétiques, brillantes et à mouvement rapide auxcouleurs riches et pleines comparables à un film. Les lignes vertes et bleues sont égalementutilisées et le cyan retenu pour un bon mélange de couleurs, un survoltage supplémentairelumière couleur et sa contribution à la suppression du chatoiement. Ce chatoiement est supprimépar le déplacement du parcours faisceau - par déviation du faisceau durant la projection, ce quisupprime tant son absorption que sa diffusion tout en conservant la pseudo-collimation (rayonsnon croisés), ce qui est important pour la netteté illimitée. Le déplacement du parcours estobtenu par balayage du faisceau sur les valves à cristaux liquides (LCLV), ce qui donne lieu àplusieurs améliorations en matière defficacité énergétique, de brillance, de contraste et 27dhomogénéité du faisceau (par suppression à la fois des ondulations mode laser et desartefacts) et une rotation de faisceau pratique pour le transfert de faisceau entre les étages de Pagelappareil. Cest, de préférence, un miroir, monté sur un galvanomètre ou un moteur aux fins
  28. 28. dune oscillation rotative, qui assure la déviation. Les images sont écrites de manièreincrémentielle sur des parties successives de létage de commande des LCLV (optique ouélectronique) tandis que le faisceau laser est synchronisé sur létage de sortie. Le faisceau estfaçonné, avec très peu de pertes dénergie, aux fins dun masquage, en un profil transversal peuprofond qui est décalé sur lécran de visualisation ainsi que sur les LCLV. Des cubesanalyseurs/diviseurs de faisceau sont préférés au-dessus de feuilles polarisantes. La modulationspatiale assurée par une LCLV et maintenue par pseudo-collimation permet la formationdimages sur des supports de projection irréguliers avec des parties à des distances différentesdu projecteur- y compris des dômes, des sculptures des monuments, des bâtiments, des chutesdeau, des embruns, du brouillard, des nuages, de la glace, des mousselines et autres structuresà étage, des arbres et autres frondaisons, des terres et des surfaces rocheuses et même desassemblages de créatures vivantes, des personnes y compris.Patent Details  G03B 21/28 (2006.01)(51) International Patent Classification  G03B 21/00 (2006.01) (IPC):  H04N 9/31 (2006.01)  TROYER, DIANE (United States of (72) Inventors (Country): America)  TROYER, DIANE (United States of (73) Owners (Country): America)  TROYER, DIANE (United States of (71) Applicants (Country): America) (74) Agent: SMART & BIGGAR (45) Issued: 2013-01-15 (86) PCT Filing Date: 1999-04-30 (87) PCT Publication Date: 1999-11-25 Examination requested: 2005-04-27 (30) Availability of licence: N/A 28 Page (30) Language of filing: English
  29. 29. Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT): Yes (86) PCT Filing Number: PCT/US1999/009501 (87) International Publication WO1999/060443 Number: (85) National Entry: 2001-11-01 Download Patent Image in Size of Number of View Patent Image PDF Format Image (KB) PagesCover Page Cover Page 60 2Abstract Abstract 63 1Claims Claims 612 18Description Description 5,276 100Drawings Drawings 461 19Representative Drawing Representative Drawing 19 1Canadian Intellectual Property Officehttp://brevets-patents.ic.gc.ca/opic-cipo/cpd/eng/patent/2372833/claims.html?type=Canadian Patents DatabaseClaims pagePatent Document Number: 2372833(54) English Title: LASER PROJECTION APPARATUS WITH LIGHT VALVE AND SCANNINGREADING BEAM 29 Page
  30. 30. CLAIMS:1. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laserlight of wavelength equal to six hundred thirty-five nanometers or longer;a reflective light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image;andmeans for directing the beam onto a face of the light valve to modulatethe beam with said desired image,wherein the laser projector is adapted to project the beam with non-crossing rays and to preserve spatial modulation in the projected beam.2. The projector of claim 1, wherein:light that appears red in the beam comprises substantially only saidlaser light of wavelength equal to 635 nanometers or longer.3. The projector of claim 1 or 2, wherein:said apparatus is adapted for projecting a beam of wavelength between635 and 650 nanometers.4. The projector of claim 1 or 2, wherein:said apparatus projects a beam of wavelength equal to 647 nanometers.5. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 4, wherein:the image is a moving picture.6. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 5, further comprising:means for also incorporating blue and green laser light into the picturebeam; andseparate, additional reflective light valves for modulating the blue andgreen light respectively.7. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein:said light valve also receives blue and green laser light for modulation,within the same light valve.8. The projector of claim 6, wherein said separate, additional reflectivelight valves comprise liquid-crystal light valves. 309. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 8, wherein said reflective light Pagevalve comprises a liquid-crystal reflective light valve.
  31. 31. 10. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 5, further comprising:further laser apparatus for projecting one or more beams that includegreen and blue laser light; andwherein the laser light of wavelength equal to 635 nanometers or longermixes with the green and blue laser light to provide substantially pureneutral colors including pure white and pure black.11. The projector of claim 10, wherein:the further laser apparatus is adapted for projecting substantially cyanlight with the blue light or the green light, or both the blue light and thegreen light.12. The projector of claim 11, wherein the combination of said means forscanning the beam, said light of wavelength equal to 635 nanometers or longer,andsaid cyan light, and the preservation of spatial modulation in the projectedbeam, provides a suppression means for at least partly suppressing visible specklein a picture formed by said laser light on a projection medium.13. The projector of claim 10, wherein one or both of (1) said means forscanning the beam, and (2) said light of wavelength equal to 635 nanometers orlonger and (3) the preservation of spatial modulation in the projected beam,provides a suppression means for at least partly suppressing visible speckle in apicture formed by said laser light on a projection medium.14. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 13, further comprising:means for receiving high-bandwidth red, green and blue computer-monitor signals from a computer;wherein the projector serves as a high-color-fidelity computer monitor.15. The projector of claim 14, wherein the reflective light valve iscontrolled by light or control signals applied to the valve by writing onto a controlstage of the valve a vector, bitmap or other computer file scanned from an image orgenerated in a computer.16. The projector of claim 14, wherein the reflective light valve iscontrolled by light or control signals applied to the valve by writing onto a control 31stage of the valve amplitude-modulated laser-diode illumination swept two-dimensionally Pageacross the control stage.
  32. 32. 17. The projector of claim 14, wherein the reflective light valve iscontrolled by light or control signals applied to the valve by writing onto a controlstage of the valve images from a small transmissive liquid-crystal display modulator, inturn written by signals derived from a source other than traditional broadcastvideo signals.18. The projector of claim 14, wherein the reflective light valve iscontrolled by light or control signals applied to the valve by writing onto a controlstage of the valve entire frames without interlace.19. The projector of claim 14, wherein the reflective light valve iscontrolled by light or control signals applied to the valve by writing onto a controlstage of the valve a motion-picture film.20. The projector of claim 14, wherein the reflective light valve iscontrolled by light or control signals applied to the valve by writing onto a controlstage of the valve a still image from a slide or overhead-projection transparency, or acolor separation made therefrom.21. The projector of claim 14, wherein the reflective light valve iscontrolled by light or control signals applied to the valve by writing onto a controlstage of the valve a live image optically coupled, without electronic intermediary, to thecontrol stage.22. The projector of any one of claims 10 to 14, wherein:the light valve is controlled by light substantially derived from a type oftraditional broadcast video signals; andsubstantially no color correction or gamma adjustment is applied toremove effects of using said 635-nanometer or longer-wavelength laser lightinstead of broadcast video standard red.23. The projector of any one of claims 10 to 13, wherein:the first-mentioned laser apparatus and the further laser apparatus,considered together, comprise one or more lasers; andeach laser in the first-mentioned laser apparatus and the further laserapparatus is exclusively a solid-state laser.24. The projector of any one of claims 10 to 13, wherein:the first-mentioned laser apparatus and the further laser apparatus, 32considered together, comprise one or more lasers; and Page
  33. 33. each laser in the first-mentioned laser apparatus and the further laserapparatus is exclusively a gas laser.25. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 9, further comprising:further laser apparatus for projecting one or more beams that includegreen and blue laser light; wherein:the proportions of light power of the 635 nanometer or longer-wavelength laser light, the green laser light and the blue laser light areeight to six to five.26. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 14:wherein the light valve has a beam-modulation stage for impressing thedesired image onto the beam, and a control stage to control said impressing;and the projector further comprises:means for writing an image incrementally onto successive portions ofthe control stage; andmeans for directing the beam onto successive selected portions of themodulation stage and means for generally synchronizing the directing meanswith the image-writing means.27. The projector of any one of claims 1 to 14, for use in forming an imageon an irregular projection medium having portions at distinctly differentdistances from the projector:wherein the light valve operates by introducing at least partial disruptionof the laser-light coherence; and comprising:means for projecting the picture beam onto such irregular projectionmedium to form an image that appears substantially sharp on said portions ofdistinctly different distances, notwithstanding said at least partialdisruption of coherence.28. A laser projection system for forming a sharp image on an irregularprojection medium having portions at distinctly differing distances from theprojector; said system comprising:laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes laser light ofwavelength equal to six hundred thirty-five nanometers or longer;a reflective light valve for impressing a sharp image onto the beam; and 33means for projecting the beam from the light valve with non-crossingrays and with preservation of spatial modulation in the projected beam, with Pagesaid impressed image being displayed sharply on substantially all such portions, at
  34. 34. distinctly different distances, of such irregular projection medium as a showfor an audience.29. The system of claim 28, wherein:the irregular projection medium comprises one or more projectionmedia comprising any of:an interior or exterior of a dome structure, ora building; or a building or structure having internal surfaces that are not generallynormal to a projection direction, ora sculpture, monument, or other structure having external surfaces thatare not generally normal to a projection direction,a waterfall, or a water fountain, or fog or a cloud, or ice,a scrim in front of a curtain or screen, or a plurality of scrims in optical series, orone or more trees, or grass, vines or other foliage, ora hillside or other landscape, or other receding surface, oran array of people or other animals or other discrete objects, orcombinations thereof, at diverse distances from the projecting means; andthe projecting means displays a protracted show on the one or moreprojection media, for the audience.30. The system of claim 28 or 29, further comprising: such irregularprojection medium.31. The system of any one of claims 28 to 30, wherein:the laser apparatus comprises one or more lasers; andeach laser in the laser apparatus is exclusively a solid-state laser.32. The system of any one of claims 28 to 31:wherein the laser apparatus projects red laser light in the picture beam;and the light valve impresses red components of an image onto the redlaser light; and further comprising:means for also incorporating blue and green laser light into the picturebeam, and separate, additional light valves for respectively impressing blue andgreen components of the image onto the blue and green light.33. The system of any one of claims 28 to 31, wherein:said light valve receives laser light components of three respective 34colors and impresses corresponding color components of the image onto the Pagethree respective light components, respectively, all within the same light valve.
  35. 35. 34. A laser projection system for forming an image on an irregularprojection medium having portions at distinctly differing distances from theprojector; said system comprising:laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes laser light ofwavelength equal to six hundred thirty-five nanometers or longer;a light valve for impressing an image onto the beam;means for directing the beam onto a face of the light valve to impresssaid image onto said beam; andmeans for projecting the beam from the light valve with non-crossingrays and with preservation of spatial modulation in the projected beam, withsaid impressed image, onto such irregular projection medium to form a substantiallysharp image on such medium at such distinctly differing distances.35. The system of claim 34, wherein:the irregular projection medium comprises one or more projectionmedia comprising any of:an interior or exterior of a dome structure, ora building; or a building or structure having internal surfaces that are not generallynormal to a projection direction, ora sculpture, monument, or other structure having external surfaces thatare not generally normal to a projection direction,a waterfall, or a water fountain, or fog or a cloud, or ice,a scrim in front of a curtain or screen, or a plurality of scrims in optical series, orone or more trees, or grass, vines or other foliage, ora hillside or other landscape, or other receding surface, oran array of people or other animals or other discrete objects, orcombinations thereof, at diverse distances from the projecting means; andthe projection means form the substantially sharp image onsubstantially each element of the selected one or more media.36. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for projecting a picture beam that includes visible laser 35light of wavelength longer than 640 nanometers; Pagea reflective light valve for modulating the beam with a desired image,
  36. 36. and means for directing the beam onto a face of the light valve to modulatethe beam with the image,wherein the laser projector is adapted to project the beam with non-crossing rays and to preserve spatial modulation in the projected beam.37. The projector of claim 36, wherein:said apparatus projects a beam of wavelength substantially equal to647 nanometers.38. The projector of claim 36:wherein the light valve impresses red components of an image onto thelaser light of wavelength longer than 640 nanometers; andfurther comprising:means for also incorporating blue and green laser light into the picturebeam, and separate, additional light valves for respectively impressing blue andgreen components of the image onto the blue and green light.39. The projector of claim 36 or 37, wherein:said light valve receives laser light components of three respectivecolors and impresses corresponding color components of the image onto thethree respective light components, respectively, all within the same light valve.40. The projector of claims 32 or 38, wherein the separate additional lightvalves comprise reflective liquid-crystal light valves.41. The projector of any one of claims 10 to 40, wherein said reflective lightvalve comprises a liquid-crystal light valve.42. A laser projector comprising:laser apparatus for projecting along a path a picture beam that includeslaser light of wavelength equal to six hundred thirty-five nanometers orlonger, a reflective light valve having a beam-modulation stage for impressing an imageonto the beam; andmeans for at least partly suppressing visible speckle in a picture formedon a projection medium by said laser light; wherein the suppressing meanscomprises displacing means for scanning the beam over the beam-modulation 36stage during projection of the beam,and wherein the laser projector is adapted to project the beam with non- Pagecrossing rays and to preserve spatial modulation in the projected beam.
  37. 37. 43. The projector of claim 42, wherein:the displacing means scans the beam over the beam-modulation stageby mechanically or electrooptically deflecting the beam path rotationally.44. The projector of claim 43, wherein:the displacing means comprises an optical deflecting element mountedfor mechanical rotation.45. The projector of claim 44, wherein:the deflecting element comprises a mirror mounted on a galvanometeror motor.46. The projector of claim 45, wherein:the mirror is mounted for rotation about an axis substantially in areflective surface of the mirror.47. The projector of any one of claims 42 to 46, wherein:the light valve also has a control stage to control said impressing; andfurther comprising:means for writing an image incrementally onto successive portions ofthe control stage; andmeans for controlling the displacing means to direct the beam ontosuccessive selected portions of the modulation stage, and to generallysynchronize the beam with the image-writing means.48. The projector of claim 47, wherein:the control stage is a photosensitive stage that receives anincrementally written optical image.49. The projector of claim 47, wherein:the control stage comprises an electrode matrix that receivesincrementally written electrical voltages.50. The projector of any one of claims 42 to 49,further comprising beam-expansion means; andwherein the displacing means and beam-expansion means cooperateto achieve a net gain in light-energy efficiency. 3751. The projector of any one of claims 42 to 50, wherein:the displacing means and beam-expansion means also cooperate to Pagesubstantially eliminate initial nonuniformity of brightness in the beam.

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