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Postmodernism and history

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A short overview of some ideas relating to postmodernism and history.

A short overview of some ideas relating to postmodernism and history.

Published in: Education, Spiritual
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  • 1. POSTMODERNISM AND HISTORY M Esterman, 2009
  • 2. THE “AGES OF HISTORIOGRAPHY” (FROM A POSTMODERN PERSPECTIVE)
  • 3. PREMODERN HISTORY
  • 4. MODERN HISTORY
  • 5. POSTMODERN HISTORY
  • 6. POSTMODERNIST THEORY ON HISTORY
  • 7. IS THERE SUCH A THING AS A POSTMODERNIST “SCHOOL”?
    • “ Postmodern” Historians
  • 8. POSTMODERN HISTORIANS AND HISTORICAL THINKERS
    • Do not share all common traits, methodology or purpose
    • Are not all historians but rather apply other theories to history (e.g. Literary, gender etc)
    • Often have competing views about the focus of history/meanings of history
    • Use varying methodologies – not all are trained historians
    • Are from different contexts (time, historiographical, philosophical etc)
    • Have different aims – some to destroy past assumptions, some to question, some to enhance
  • 9. “ POSTMODERN” HISTORIANS – WEBB, EXTENSION HISTORY: THE HISTORIANS
    • Paul Carter, Lost Subjects (1999):
        • Presents his history by means of a series of ‘voices’. No omniscient narrator. (much like Herodotus?)
    • Simon Schama, Dead Certainties (1991):
      • Admits that parts of the history is a “work of the imagination that chronicles historical events” – either his own interpretation of a variety of sources combined OR entirely his ideas based on what he understands was likely to have happened.
    • Richard Price, Alabi’s World , (1990):
      • Using different fonts to give the idea of different voices – requires reader to imagine various accents, voices etc.
    • Norman Davies, The Isles (1999):
      • Doesn’t use national teminology i.e. “Britain” as he says it detracts from the contribution of other groups
      • Uses various other time-neutral imaginary terms e.g. “Midnight Isles”
      • Mixes traditional sources (Celtic archaeology) with non-traditional (myths, ancient Irish literature & modern songs)

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